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Current 1L at Ryerson, what do you think thus far?

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Needless to say classes are online so it sucks you guys cant take advantage of the new building as much as you'd like, but what are your thoughts thus far on the program, the profs, anything else you enjoy or dislike!

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I'd also like to follow, though from a "what could have been" perspective. I was accepted to Ryerson last cycle but ultimately decided to accept elsewhere.

Edited by LabouriousCorvid

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1 hour ago, FortifiedEight said:

I love that it's been 4 days and no Rye student has stepped up to share :D

they in hiding 👀

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I was not part of the anti-Ryerson party last cycle (though the pro-Ryerson hyperpartisans got under my skin a bit), but I do find this silence a bit conspicuous. There were so many keen applicants and acceptees, that I would have expected a big response.

Maybe they're just all busy with mid-terms this week.

Also, blah blah blah something something coding. ;)

-GM 

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I was part of the anti-Ryerson party last cycle, but I feel for its students. Going through 1L online without the support of upper-year students or alumni must be difficult. 

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Many student law society groups are setting up mentors from their schools for 1L Rye students. They won't be alone for long! I was thinking of signing up just to get the tea. 😈

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Ryerson has been great so far. The profs are all really effective and they’ve adapted well to online platforms. Yes, theres no alumni network but the careers office seems to be generating some positive buzz in the field. I wouldn’t automatically take silence for bad reviews.

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1 hour ago, funkyarddog said:

Ryerson has been great so far. The profs are all really effective and they’ve adapted well to online platforms. Yes, theres no alumni network but the careers office seems to be generating some positive buzz in the field. I wouldn’t automatically take silence for bad reviews.

Hope you're having a solid year. Good luck homie

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Ryerson 1L here. Most of us don't use this platform because of the previous negativity hence the silence.

Our profs have largely adapted well to the online shift. A couple are insisting on running in-person/hybrid lectures but in-person attendance is pretty low. Even then those profs are also adapting to a new way of teaching.

Obviously we don't have the same alumni networks to rely on or briefs and outlines form previous years (we get the pleasure of writing those all ourselves). As such there's a lot of emphasis placed on how we will need to network for ourselves as we can't rely on years of built up goodwill towards our school.

The biggest difference compared to other law schools is probably the tutorials. Since we will graduate "competent" we participate in an extra 5 hours of tutorial sessions each week. These are taught by practising lawyers and correspond with our other first year classes (1 ethics tutorial, 1 torts tutorial, etc). The content in the tutorials varies as it's up to the practitioners and profs to decide. For examples in ethics we recently completed a retainer agreement exercise and in Legal Research and Writing we completed a multi-case analysis. Some tutorials require reading extra materials while others focus on practical applications of what was covered in the previous lecture.

Idk, how it's going at other schools, but all our course are being graded as usual with no pass/fail courses.

Further questions?

PS. There's been no coding. Yet.

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17 minutes ago, Cookes159 said:

Ryerson 1L here. Most of us don't use this platform because of the previous negativity hence the silence.

Our profs have largely adapted well to the online shift. A couple are insisting on running in-person/hybrid lectures but in-person attendance is pretty low. Even then those profs are also adapting to a new way of teaching.

Obviously we don't have the same alumni networks to rely on or briefs and outlines form previous years (we get the pleasure of writing those all ourselves). As such there's a lot of emphasis placed on how we will need to network for ourselves as we can't rely on years of built up goodwill towards our school.

The biggest difference compared to other law schools is probably the tutorials. Since we will graduate "competent" we participate in an extra 5 hours of tutorial sessions each week. These are taught by practising lawyers and correspond with our other first year classes (1 ethics tutorial, 1 torts tutorial, etc). The content in the tutorials varies as it's up to the practitioners and profs to decide. For examples in ethics we recently completed a retainer agreement exercise and in Legal Research and Writing we completed a multi-case analysis. Some tutorials require reading extra materials while others focus on practical applications of what was covered in the previous lecture.

Idk, how it's going at other schools, but all our course are being graded as usual with no pass/fail courses.

Further questions?

PS. There's been no coding. Yet.

Thank you for sharing! Have you been networking? If so, how are you finding reception by lawyers?

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2 minutes ago, FortifiedEight said:

Thank you for sharing! Have you been networking? If so, how are you finding reception by lawyers?

I can't speak for my classmates. But I have been.

So far so good, but I also have 0 clue what I'm doing. I know there is some apprehension because the school is unproven but, that'll be up to us to overcome as individuals.

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2 minutes ago, Cookes159 said:

I can't speak for my classmates. But I have been.

So far so good, but I also have 0 clue what I'm doing. I know there is some apprehension because the school is unproven but, that'll be up to us to overcome as individuals.

Has the move by other schools' student law societies to provide you with mentors been announced to you? I'm just curious if the word is out about it, I can only imagine how stressful it must be with zero guidance.

Have you spoken to your Career Development Office (or equivalent) yet? I'm curious what sort of guidance they might be giving.

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The mentorship programs were immediately announced to us. We're not entirely without guidance it's just a matter of finding it for yourself.

The first intensive was run by the CDO and they are open for students who want to make appointments to speak with them. Guidance wise they've emphasized building a network and helping to facilitate that by hosting guest speaker we were encouraged to connect with.

 

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1 minute ago, Cookes159 said:

The mentorship programs were immediately announced to us. We're not entirely without guidance it's just a matter of finding it for yourself.

The first intensive was run by the CDO and they are open for students who want to make appointments to speak with them. Guidance wise they've emphasized building a network and helping to facilitate that by hosting guest speaker we were encouraged to connect with.

 

Thanks for sharing. Good luck!

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Hi, 1L from Ryerson. 

Ahahaha I think it's safe to say the current law students rarely check Law students forum, with the amount of readings we have.

Having said that... a few food for thoughts.

Overall, positive experience so far in the program. I found the Faculty and the program to be mostly accommodating and adaptive to changes. We have a strong cohort connection, despite us starting in virtual setting...  

We have an option to attend one class in-person, if you want to. A lot of us mostly join via Zoom.

The CDPPO or the Career Office has been supportive in application process for those who are interested In summer 1L positions. 

Generally found the external stakeholders, and the legal community to be very open and supportive in engaging and connecting with us in terms of networking. 

Please let me know if there are specific questions, happy to share.

Thx

Edited by nawlyer
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Hey everyone, I am also a 1L at RU Law. We just finished our reading week so we were all relaxing instead of using LawStudents.ca as procrastination method. 

I agree with what has been said by nawlyer and cookes159, it is hard starting as a new cohort in a brand new law school. We do not have outlines or advice from upper years. Even though the Ontario law student community have come together to be peer mentors for us, Ryerson University is doing law school very differently, so our mentors do not completely understand our plight. That being said, if you are thinking of applying to Ryerson University, you will have all of us lovely 1L's who are making outlines, creating clubs and organizations, and starting the Ryerson Law Student Society for when you all join us. 

My undergrad program was also brand new, so I am quite familiar with slight disorganization, in fact, I don't really know what university is like without it. What I can say is that online school sucks. For example, the class I am doing the best in is the one in-person class. Unlike my colleagues above, I have gone to every in-person class and it is the class I am doing the best in. Obviously, everyone in law school is struggling with zoom university. My partner goes to UofT Law and I have a few friends at UofO and Western law. All of us are struggling with the same difficulties: trouble paying attention, lack of motivation, and perhaps some mental health issues from staying at home all day. Similarly, our professors are struggling with tech, keeping us engaged, etc. I sincerely hope that this year's applicants, where ever they go, will have in-person classes. However, the amazing thing about RU Law is despite everything going on, the students are working very hard to build study groups and friendships. Because we are a brand new program and in the midst of a pandemic, the emphasis on community building is huge. 

Obviously law school is not just about building friendships, we also want jobs, right? Like my colleagues above, I have started networking and am on the job hunt for coveted summer positions. The funny thing is being at RU Law has helped me get interviews. Everyone is so curious to hear about RU Law, many of us are getting interviews just so people can hear what its like. While this method may not work for everyone, I tend to interview pretty well, so people's curiosity allows me to get my foot in the door!

Another difference I have noticed based on conversations with my partner and friends, is RU Law has significantly more homework assignments. This is due to the joint teaching strategy my colleagues have described above. As we will be graduating as "competent" lawyers (i.e. we are not required to article), a lot of the practical skills are interwoven into our lectures and lessons via tutorials. Whereas most schools have maybe one or two written assignments, perhaps a few midterms, and a large exam at the end of the semester, most of our classes have 3-6 assignments over the course of the semester and no midterms. For Contracts we have to write a contract. In Property we right a lease agreement. In Torts we have practiced client in-take and interviews. In Legal Research and Writing we have an oral advocacy (a mini-moot) as our final assessment. From what I've heard, RU Law's approach is very different than other schools. This system may not work for everyone, particularly those who are used to a very academic approach to their studies. I have found most of our assignments very interesting and thought-provoking, though time consuming. 

Most of my friends are in law school with untraditional backgrounds. Some examples include kinesiology, psychology, engineering, health sciences, even a dance student! We also have many mature students who have worked for a number of years or have PhDs. We have a great diversity of opinions and perspectives in our classes!

To end off, RU Law is very different from other law schools. It is practical, tightknit, and a little disorganized at times. But RU Law is doing something innovative and new. I have loved my professors, the subject matter, and my classmates so far. It's not UBC or UofT, but I have honestly never met more driven students in my life. 

Good luck with your applications and feel free to message me with any other questions, concerns, or criticism you have! 

 

 

 

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