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many2021

Help! why discussion in class is important for study law?

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For those already in Law School:

Can someone kindly provide some example of how diversity/ life experience/ different perspective come into place to enrich the class discussion?

e.g. why law school would like you to show your leadership skills? experience? award etc....

I never attend a class or lecture for law so when I heard something like student with different background and perspective will benefit the discussion.....I cannot imagine how that benefit the study of law.

Any input is great so I can get a better picture of what to include in the personal statement. Maybe something that is minor to me but it is "good to know" for law school.

many thanks

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Assuming this is a serious question - and glancing at your history, it seems to be - there's only one answer I can think of. The value of a diverse class in law school is an assumed value. To the degree that it's considered in the admissions process, that decision was made at a high level and fully digested already and you don't need to discuss how and why coming from a diverse background will improve the class as a whole. That argument has been made and won. You just need to discuss your background.

Hope that helps.

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A diversity of thought and experience can provide new lens and perspectives from which the class can examine a topic or subject. 

As for what you should include, no one can tell you that because no one knows your experience or history! Include what you think sets you apart or what you think would bring value to your class. 

 

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I could interpret your question as "Do you, SNAILS, believe that class discussion benefits from input from a diverse group of students? Why?"

Now, I fully agree with Diplock if you are asking "Is it true that law schools believe in diversity?" So yes, discuss your diverse background in your PS or wherever (everyone has at least some diversity, or we would all be the same) and do so with the intent of  making the law schools look favorably upon your application.

If you are asking the question I suggested in the first line (and this seems to be a fairly irrelevant question other than for philosophical purposes), then yes, I believe class discussion benefits from contributors of diverse backgrounds. I consider myself an opponent of the proposition that every group requires a black guy, an Asian woman, and a member of the LGBT community to be fully rounded. Instead, I would consider diversity of opinion more on the grounds of background and experience: a 21 year old nerdy genius, a 40 year old former business owner, a former food bank director in an inner city, a person  who has struggled financially and dealt with lack of access to resources in a rural area.

This latter view may be of some use if you, ironically, find yourself a member of the "wrong" social demographic to meet the typical definition of diversity for purposes of entry to law school (i.e. you are white and straight).

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12 hours ago, many2021 said:

I never attend a class or lecture for law so when I heard something like student with different background and perspective will benefit the discussion.....I cannot imagine how that benefit the study of law.

Laws apply to everyone. Laws affect everyone differently. Diversity of backgrounds within a discussion group allows for a better understanding of the different ways people are affected by the same set of laws. You can't properly practice law unless you understand and internalize this concept.

Edit: I'd like to add an example of the value of diverse experiences/backgrounds as I experienced in law school:

Taking a course on Intellectual Property, a classmate had a MSc in immunology and worked on vaccine development, and had valuable insights on pharmaceutical patents.

Taking a course on Legal Perspectives, as a BIPOC I was able to provide insight on the experience of BIPOC encounters with law enforcement. A classmate was a retired police officer, who was also able to provide valuable insight from the other side of the coin.

Edited by canuckfanatic
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Here's the thing, the legal community as a whole lacks diversity, even the demographic of most law students (based on admissions statistics) are usually white males/females that come from middle to upper class backgrounds. By having a variety of perspectives due to various ethnic diversities, or social status, it provides different insights and different lenses to view various cases or anything of that sort. Regarding the legal profession, it helps having lawyers come from various backgrounds because they will likely be more successful at understanding and representing marginalized groups.

Edited by Syndicate03
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