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HumanCalculator

Applying with 60 vs 90 credits completed?

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In regards to McGill, would they consider an applicant more competitive if they applied with a completed degree at the time of application in comparison to someone who has 60 credits completed? Both applicants hypothetically would be graduated at the time of starting law classes, however one applicant is graduated at the time of application, while the other is in their 3rd year of undergrad.

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I asked a similar question last year to the Admission Office of Mcgill.

The response was as follow (sorry in french) : « Cependant, étant donné le grand nombre de bonnes candidatures de la part d'étudiants qui auront complété un premier cycle au moment de l'inscription en droit, il est rare qu'on admette un étudiant n’ayant pas complété un diplôme universitaire. » (11 march, 2019)

In english (simplify) : There is a lot of good applicants who will have completed  a diploma when applying for law. Yes, you can can apply but it is rare that we accept students who didn't complete a diploma at the moment of admission.

I hope this help.

*FIY, i was/am not a student at Mcgill or never applied.

EDIT : From Mcgill Admission : https://www.mcgill.ca/law/bcl-jd/admissions-guide/eligibility

« While candidates with 60 credits of university studies are eligible to apply to the Faculty of Law, admission to the program is highly competitive. Almost all students admitted in the “University” category will have completed an undergraduate degree before starting our BCL/JD program. »

Edited by benas

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As a current 1L, I would say a plurality of the cohort applied in their final year of undergrad (meaning they would only have 2/3 or 3/4 years completed at the time application). I think the above reply is referring to students who are not in their final year at the time of application. 

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What dwight is saying is correct in regards to my question. There has been some past confusion over « While candidates with 60 credits of university studies are eligible to apply to the Faculty of Law, admission to the program is highly competitive. Almost all students admitted in the “University” category will have completed an undergraduate degree before starting our BCL/JD program. »

 

However, I am asking specificially about the time of an application being submitted, NOT when one would be starting fall classes in admission. I understand admitting a candidate into the program who will not be completing their undergrad is very rare. In other words, do they evaluate an application more favorably if they are already graduated in comparison to someone who will be graduating.

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1 hour ago, HumanCalculator said:

do they evaluate an application more favorably if they are already graduated in comparison to someone who will be graduating.

For what it's worth, I have seen no evidence that one is favoured over the other and I think the admissions office would tell you the same. 

That being said, people who have already finished their undergrad may have spent a year or more in a job, involved in some initiative/organization, travelling, volunteering, etc. Those might be aspects of their application that distinguish them and get the interest of admissions officers. 

But like I said there's a large number of admits who go straight from undergrad to law. Usually they have interesting experiences throughout their undergrad to share though. Hope that helps. 

Edited by dwight98

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