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JD/MBA vs JD/MA Economics

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I am considering both programs mentioned in the title, and my goal is Bay Street.

JD/MBA obviously offers better opportunities for big law, but the main drawback is the cost.

JD/MA in Economics would most likely be free at my current university where I am in my fourth year studying economics. I already have a master's thesis proposal from one of my undergraduate classes, and my area of focus is industrial economics (competition, mergers, acquisitions, etc.).

Any advice on the better option is appreciated!

 

 

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I think either will serve you well. 

All other things being equal, I'd do the JD/MBA because it's a more well trodden path to big law and you're more likely to learn directly applicable concepts.

However, taking into account that the MA would be free, and that you are already somewhat on the path, I would do the JD/MA. 

Another thing to consider: until very recently (IMHO), all law degrees were viewed as equal. (Now, it seems to me that law schools are separating into the "new schools", like Ryerson, TRU, etc. and the "old schools - we will see if that is a meaningful distinction or not but it seems to me that distinction is forming.) I don't think that is true of MBAs or an MA in Econ; some schools are probably "better" than others. 

 

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im assuming you have little to no full time work experience seeing as youre still in undergrad. in that case, you also need to ask yourself whether you will be making the most of an MBA at this stage in your life. ive heard from people on this sub and elsewhere that you’re best able to extract the full value of an MBA when you’ve got work experience under your belt. 

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Economics because it's way more interesting, and in my mind useful as education than an MBA.

But if you only want it as a route to big law, then the MBA makes more sense. But that's a hefty debt bill to increase your odds at a six figure job starting in the low 100s.

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Hi I’m not sure if you are aware of the difficulty in each program. I don’t want to say an MBA is easy but it is certainly doable whereas a masters in economics is hard for almost any individual regardless of how smart. Have you taken advanced macroeconomics, advanced microeconomics and advanced econometrics? To give you an idea of the math required, I got A+ in stats 1, A+ in stats 2, A+ in calc, A+ in calc 2, A+ in econometrics, A+ in intro micro, A in intro macro, A in intermediate macro 1, A+ in intermediate micro 1, A+ in intermediate macro 2 and A in intermediate micro 2. As you can see I did quite well in my economics courses however the masters level is nothing like the undergrad. I think it’s the only masters degree where the best preparation is an undergrad degree that is not the same program. Economics undergrad typically does not prepare you well for the masters. The best undergrad degrees for the masters are engineering, physics and mathematics,  or at least a minor in mathematics. Also there is a noticeable gap between programs for MA in economics you probably want to go to a top 4, U of T, Western (no masters only PhD available), Queens and UBC. UBC is #1 in Canada but any school in T4 is pretty great. Then there is second tier such as Simon Fraser, McMaster, York, Calgary and others, then tier 3, McGill, Windsor, Ryerson etc. If you want to know whether to take the MA in economics or the MBA, please take the advanced courses at your university or else you’re going to get a major shock. For example, it is common that 70% of the students drop out in the advanced macro course in undergrad. If it’s already too late to enroll in advanced macro for example, please look up David Romer advanced macroeconomics, you can get the PDF for free, try the questions in the book a couple chapters in. Hopefully you choose economics it’s intellectually stimulating and I love it and I hope you will as well. I just want you to be well informed so you can make the best decision for yourself. 

Edited by powerstrengthdedication

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If you're interested in Competition Law (sounds like you may be), then the MA Econ makes a lot of sense. Take a look at Competition Associates and you'll see a fair number with that combination. 

The JD/MBA helps much more for Bay St in general, but not all programs are created equal, and you'll have to consider cost and you could do OCIs with just the straight JD anyway. 

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4 hours ago, powerstrengthdedication said:

For example, it is common that 70% of the students drop out in the advanced macro course in undergrad. 

100% agree it was hard...not even talking about now you need to use that GPA for law school.... I wonder if the law school admission committee knows that. Half of the class in the final was failed.

Edited by many2021

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I'm a JD/MBA student. Beyond employment prospects, what do you want to learn? That should drive your decision rather than whether one has a slight edge in employer favorability than the other (both are assets). 

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11 hours ago, powerstrengthdedication said:

Hi I’m not sure if you are aware of the difficulty in each program. I don’t want to say an MBA is easy but it is certainly doable whereas a masters in economics is hard for almost any individual regardless of how smart. Have you taken advanced macroeconomics, advanced microeconomics and advanced econometrics? To give you an idea of the math required, I got A+ in stats 1, A+ in stats 2, A+ in calc, A+ in calc 2, A+ in econometrics, A+ in intro micro, A in intro macro, A in intermediate macro 1, A+ in intermediate micro 1, A+ in intermediate macro 2 and A in intermediate micro 2. As you can see I did quite well in my economics courses however the masters level is nothing like the undergrad. I think it’s the only masters degree where the best preparation is an undergrad degree that is not the same program. Economics undergrad typically does not prepare you well for the masters. The best undergrad degrees for the masters are engineering, physics and mathematics,  or at least a minor in mathematics. Also there is a noticeable gap between programs for MA in economics you probably want to go to a top 4, U of T, Western (no masters only PhD available), Queens and UBC. UBC is #1 in Canada but any school in T4 is pretty great. Then there is second tier such as Simon Fraser, McMaster, York, Calgary and others, then tier 3, McGill, Windsor, Ryerson etc. If you want to know whether to take the MA in economics or the MBA, please take the advanced courses at your university or else you’re going to get a major shock. For example, it is common that 70% of the students drop out in the advanced macro course in undergrad. If it’s already too late to enroll in advanced macro for example, please look up David Romer advanced macroeconomics, you can get the PDF for free, try the questions in the book a couple chapters in. Hopefully you choose economics it’s intellectually stimulating and I love it and I hope you will as well. I just want you to be well informed so you can make the best decision for yourself. 

The prestige of programs at different universities is definitely something I have in mind at the moment. I am tempted to stay at my current institution (tier 2) to continue research with the faculty I am familiar with since the pandemic will probably create barriers in building new connections if schools continue to be online. 

In order to do economics research, I have definitely completed advanced economics courses, and I have found no difficulties. 

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2 hours ago, lawstudent20202020 said:

There are no tiers when it comes to Canadian law schools.

I think OP was referring to the tiers of MA Economics programs

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