Jump to content
Schooliscool

Do people do the "further readings"?

Recommended Posts

There's an overwhelming amount of readings to begin with and I'm not sure if I'm disadvantaged by not reading them? This question mainly stems from my Property Law class at TRU. There's typically 6+ cases assigned each week as further readings but I can't seem to find the time to get through them nor do they come up in the lecture... Any advice? Thoughts? Personal experience?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did some of them, based on level of interest and/or confusion. A lot of times I was confused about a point - either I really didn't understand it or I just thought it was weird. Reading more helped. I also just found it interesting, and was mostly guided by my curiosity in this. Sometimes I'd skip required readings where the point seemed clear and a case brief made perfect sense, and do the extra readings instead. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is rarely a good idea to do only what is absolutely required. In law school, or in life.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you get what's going on from the basic readings, class, and notes? If so, may not be needed. 

Are you confused about the topic, or why something went a certain way? Could be helpful. 

Profs usually focus on the recommended, but they didn't just choose the others at random. I know mine would refer to them as sources on specific points if there was confusion. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need to read enough to satisfy yourself that you understand the issue.

If you think the answer/point is completely obvious, odds are you haven't dug deep enough yet.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, erinl2 said:

It is rarely a good idea to do only what is absolutely required. In law school, or in life.

You can do perfectly well in law school without having ever touched those "optional" readings.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I did substantially all of the required and recommended readings, but additional cases I would only skim. I found treatises the most helpful, particularly Hogg's Constitutional law and Klar's Torts.

Reading cases is a useful skill and necessary for the exam, but there is a lot of extraneous information there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Sykes is teaching your property law class you might want to find cans that atleast have summaries of the additional readings.

When I took the course with Sykes one of the optional readings made its way onto the final.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's not enough time in the day to do all of the required readings and the optional readings. At least, not if you care about other things like sleep, exercise, friends, etc.

11 minutes ago, Mal said:

particularly Hogg's Constitutional law

Everyone at TRU swears by this one, it's super helpful for learning constitutional law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, canuckfanatic said:

There's not enough time in the day to do all of the required readings and the optional readings. At least, not if you care about other things like sleep, exercise, friends, etc.

Everyone at TRU swears by this one, it's super helpful for learning constitutional law.

The 2007 edition one? Or the 2019 student edition? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Schooliscool said:

The 2007 edition one? Or the 2019 student edition? 

I was in 1L in 2017 so I guess we were using the 2007 edition? Constitutional law isn't a particularly agile area of law... 

Compare the cases in your syllabus to an older CAN on the CAN Bank to see if there's any difference. If not, just get the older/cheaper one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, canuckfanatic said:

I was in 1L in 2017 so I guess we were using the 2007 edition? Constitutional law isn't a particularly agile area of law... 

Err, maybe for separation of powers, but there's been some meaningful Charter and Aboriginal Rights decisions in the last 13+ years.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

Err, maybe for separation of powers, but there's been some meaningful Charter and Aboriginal Rights decisions in the last 13+ years.

For sure, a couple of those Aboriginal Rights cases came out of BC and were the focus of a few lectures. I meant to suggest that the 2007 edition can be used in combination with the up-to-date required textbook and isn't necessarily detrimental.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, georgecostanzajr said:

You can do perfectly well in law school without having ever touched those "optional" readings.

I never said you couldn't.  You have missed the point I was attempting to make. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I grew to rely fairly heavily on Hogg, Roach, and Ziff (for property). There were some short answer questions on the property exam that were directly out of Ziff, if I recall. Other sorts of "optional" readings, not so much. 

You'll have to read most of these cases multiple times. Might as well reallocate some of that time to a good textbook. I often found it helpful to read the textbook, then read the cases, then clarify a few things in the textbook and prepare my notes. 

Now when I say "I", I actually had a pretty reliable study group, so we divided this cases up and taught them to each other. But it got us all on the dean's list. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, erinl2 said:

It is rarely a good idea to do only what is absolutely required. In law school, or in life.

I would say that one of the most important life skills is knowing exactly where you can get away with only doing what is absolutely required, so that you can conserve your energy to focus on those things where doing extra is actually rewarding. In law school, practice, and everything else.

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...