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am2gritt

Apply access or general (3.82, 3.89, 156)

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Hi everyone!

cGPA/B3: 3.82

L2: 3.89

LSAT: 156 😕 

I'm now considering whether it would be better to apply in the access category. 

I got a concussion in my third year of undergrad and I've had post-concussion syndrome ever since. I've been able to find ways to still do well at school and land good co-op positions (worked at large law firm downtown and work at boutique law firm now). However, I found it incredibly difficult to get a score in the 160s on my PTs this summer due to degree of active concentration required, my tendency to lose focus (concussion symptom) and the time constraint. Basically, the entire process of studying this summer killed my head; after any PT I would need to sit in a dark room and rest all day because my head was on fire. I know my head can't handle studying for and taking the lsat again. I'm wondering whether this claim would be sufficient to qualify for the access category and whether they would accept it as a "direct causal connection" to my LSAT score? 

Thanks for your input!

 

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15 minutes ago, am2gritt said:

Hi everyone!

cGPA/B3: 3.82

L2: 3.89

LSAT: 156 😕 

I'm now considering whether it would be better to apply in the access category. 

I got a concussion in my third year of undergrad and I've had post-concussion syndrome ever since. I've been able to find ways to still do well at school and land good co-op positions (worked at large law firm downtown and work at boutique law firm now). However, I found it incredibly difficult to get a score in the 160s on my PTs this summer due to degree of active concentration required, my tendency to lose focus (concussion symptom) and the time constraint. Basically, the entire process of studying this summer killed my head; after any PT I would need to sit in a dark room and rest all day because my head was on fire. I know my head can't handle studying for and taking the lsat again. I'm wondering whether this claim would be sufficient to qualify for the access category and whether they would accept it as a "direct causal connection" to my LSAT score? 

Thanks for your input!

 

With your "concussion symptom"  Law school may consider if you can handle law school?

Rewrite until you get 160

 

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2 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

With your "concussion symptom"  Law school may consider if you can handle law school?

Rewrite until you get 160

 

Would applying access be okay for the reason of losing family members or no?

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1 hour ago, jdhopeful16 said:

Would applying access be okay for the reason of losing family members or no?

I give up

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4 hours ago, am2gritt said:

Basically, the entire process of studying this summer killed my head; after any PT I would need to sit in a dark room and rest all day because my head was on fire. I know my head can't handle studying for and taking the lsat again.

You shouldn't go to law school if your symptoms are this severe. You won't have the time to take all-day breaks during 1L, and while the workload is manageable, it never stops. 

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Damn kudos to you for trooping through. That is commendable considering how tough it must be to study/perform for the LSAT while having those symptoms. I would definitely consider applying access if this chronically affected you throughout undergrad as well. Hopefully you can improve your LSAT a couple points as that would give you a good shot at UWO imo under access category.  If law school is the dream don't let up! 

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4 hours ago, jdhopeful16 said:

Would applying access be okay for the reason of losing family members or no?

While it is unfortunately very common for students to lose family members, depending on your situation applying Access may be applicable. I will not pry into what that situation is. Ask yourself whether you had unique extenuating circumstances which affected your grades (I'm assuming you are asking because of poor grades) for a reasonable amount of time after. If so and you are able to provide some documentation (preferably from a counselor, doctor, etc.) then this may be an appropriate claim. Please do not go this route unless your academics were genuinely impacted due to a profound loss. A sad few days and some missed classes for the funeral of a grandma you rarely saw are not circumstances which merit special consideration. Losing a parent unexpectedly is a different story.

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