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FirstGear

Earliest LSAT write and Preparedness

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I am applying for the 2021 Sep. intake for law. Looking at the LSAT, the earliest writes available are in November 2020, Jan. 2021. The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021). Not sure about other schools and am looking into that - but I'd imagine they would not be that far off. If I write any LSATs after Jan. 2021, I would only have the results in time for law intakes in 2022, not 2021.

I have not written an actual LSAT before - only old/practice exams for practice. My score definitely needs a 10+ improvement to be competitive.

If I register for the Nov. 2020 write, would the 1.5 months until then give me sufficient time to prepare ? 

Edited by FirstGear

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No one can answer that. Is it possible to increase your score significantly in a month and half? Sure it is. Is it a guarantee? Nope. 

But if you're set on applying this cycle the January date might be too tight so writing in November may be your only option. 

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2 hours ago, FirstGear said:

I am applying for the 2021 Sep. intake for law. Looking at the LSAT, the earliest writes available are in November 2020, Jan. 2021. The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021). Not sure about other schools and am looking into that - but I'd imagine they would not be that far off. If I write any LSATs after Jan. 2021, I would only have the results in time for law intakes in 2022, not 2021.

I have not written an actual LSAT before - only old/practice exams for practice. My score definitely needs a 10+ improvement to be competitive.

If I register for the Nov. 2020 write, would the 1.5 months until then give me sufficient time to prepare ? 

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

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2 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

I was working and ran a business until COVID-19 hit, and did not go back to school (or have intentions to) until then. 

Edited by FirstGear

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4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

Edited by MountainMon

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16 minutes ago, MountainMon said:

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

I imagine Luckycharm is attempting to express that, yes, although most if not all schools accept a January score, it is always of benefit to have a valid and competitive score in hand prior to applying so that you know where you might have a reasonable chance of admission, so as not to waste time and money applying. Yes, lots of applicants will write later than what is ideal if they decide more recently to enter the fray. :)

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50 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

I imagine Luckycharm is attempting to express that, yes, although most if not all schools accept a January score, it is always of benefit to have a valid and competitive score in hand prior to applying so that you know where you might have a reasonable chance of admission, so as not to waste time and money applying. Yes, lots of applicants will write later than what is ideal if they decide more recently to enter the fray. :)

I figured the alternative would be to wait another whole year until admission. The cost of a LSAT write potentially gone bad, is worth the upside of potentially not having to wait another whole year. That is unless reasonable improvement (10+ score increase; what id need based on a diagnostic) is unrealistic in a 1.5 month period. 

Edited by FirstGear

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1 hour ago, MountainMon said:

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

Thanks for the response. 

My record time of competing a semester-long university course has been 11 days. Was hoping that replicating a similar effort would make preparation for the LSAT feasible in 1.5 months. Though from observation it seems like the LSAT is less "learnable" than traditional studies, hence my question. I've done a few old exams as diagnostics and the logic games are the main killer of my score. I get much of the questions correct on the other sections. 

Edited by FirstGear

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40 minutes ago, FirstGear said:

I figured the alternative would be to wait another whole year until admission. The cost of a LSAT write potentially gone bad, is worth the upside of potentially not having to wait another whole year. That is unless reasonable improvement (10+ score increase; what id need based on a diagnostic) is unrealistic in a 1.5 month period. 

If the cost of, not only the LSAT but of, application fees isn't prohibitive for you, that's one thing. However, for some applicants, this is a significant expense.  Going from ~44/45th percentile to the ~80th percentile in a month and a half isn't possible for everyone. It may be for you but there's no way anyone here can tell you that.

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13 hours ago, FirstGear said:

The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021).

While most schools only consider your highest LSAT, UofA averages multiple LSAT scores. If you're interested in UofA, and not ready for the November LSAT, it may be beneficial to delay your write until January.

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