Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
FirstGear

Earliest LSAT write and Preparedness

Recommended Posts

I am applying for the 2021 Sep. intake for law. Looking at the LSAT, the earliest writes available are in November 2020, Jan. 2021. The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021). Not sure about other schools and am looking into that - but I'd imagine they would not be that far off. If I write any LSATs after Jan. 2021, I would only have the results in time for law intakes in 2022, not 2021.

I have not written an actual LSAT before - only old/practice exams for practice. My score definitely needs a 10+ improvement to be competitive.

If I register for the Nov. 2020 write, would the 1.5 months until then give me sufficient time to prepare ? 

Edited by FirstGear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No one can answer that. Is it possible to increase your score significantly in a month and half? Sure it is. Is it a guarantee? Nope. 

But if you're set on applying this cycle the January date might be too tight so writing in November may be your only option. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FirstGear said:

I am applying for the 2021 Sep. intake for law. Looking at the LSAT, the earliest writes available are in November 2020, Jan. 2021. The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021). Not sure about other schools and am looking into that - but I'd imagine they would not be that far off. If I write any LSATs after Jan. 2021, I would only have the results in time for law intakes in 2022, not 2021.

I have not written an actual LSAT before - only old/practice exams for practice. My score definitely needs a 10+ improvement to be competitive.

If I register for the Nov. 2020 write, would the 1.5 months until then give me sufficient time to prepare ? 

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

I was working and ran a business until COVID-19 hit, and did not go back to school (or have intentions to) until then. 

Edited by FirstGear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

How can anyone tell you if 1.5 months is sufficient time to prepare for LSAT?

You didn't think about law school just yesterday, do you? Why didn't you write / prepare your LSAT earlier?

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

Edited by MountainMon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, MountainMon said:

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

I imagine Luckycharm is attempting to express that, yes, although most if not all schools accept a January score, it is always of benefit to have a valid and competitive score in hand prior to applying so that you know where you might have a reasonable chance of admission, so as not to waste time and money applying. Yes, lots of applicants will write later than what is ideal if they decide more recently to enter the fray. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

I imagine Luckycharm is attempting to express that, yes, although most if not all schools accept a January score, it is always of benefit to have a valid and competitive score in hand prior to applying so that you know where you might have a reasonable chance of admission, so as not to waste time and money applying. Yes, lots of applicants will write later than what is ideal if they decide more recently to enter the fray. :)

I figured the alternative would be to wait another whole year until admission. The cost of a LSAT write potentially gone bad, is worth the upside of potentially not having to wait another whole year. That is unless reasonable improvement (10+ score increase; what id need based on a diagnostic) is unrealistic in a 1.5 month period. 

Edited by FirstGear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MountainMon said:

I don't think your tone here is necessary. @FirstGear there's nothing wrong with writing in November and then January if necessary, it's exactly what I'm doing. If anything you may be at a slight disadvantage but from what I've read it it's pretty negligible. AFAIK writing in January scores are accepted for all schools.

Thanks for the response. 

My record time of competing a semester-long university course has been 11 days. Was hoping that replicating a similar effort would make preparation for the LSAT feasible in 1.5 months. Though from observation it seems like the LSAT is less "learnable" than traditional studies, hence my question. I've done a few old exams as diagnostics and the logic games are the main killer of my score. I get much of the questions correct on the other sections. 

Edited by FirstGear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, FirstGear said:

I figured the alternative would be to wait another whole year until admission. The cost of a LSAT write potentially gone bad, is worth the upside of potentially not having to wait another whole year. That is unless reasonable improvement (10+ score increase; what id need based on a diagnostic) is unrealistic in a 1.5 month period. 

If the cost of, not only the LSAT but of, application fees isn't prohibitive for you, that's one thing. However, for some applicants, this is a significant expense.  Going from ~44/45th percentile to the ~80th percentile in a month and a half isn't possible for everyone. It may be for you but there's no way anyone here can tell you that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, FirstGear said:

The write of Jan. 2021 would barely make the deadline for U of A's 2021 Sep. intake (Feb. 1, 2021).

While most schools only consider your highest LSAT, UofA averages multiple LSAT scores. If you're interested in UofA, and not ready for the November LSAT, it may be beneficial to delay your write until January.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • Hi everyone, I was wondering whether the reason for my low cGPA might help my chance for admissions . I did okay in my first year (about a B/B+ average), but in second year my grades dropped dramatically. I was clearly in the wrong major (we declare our major in year 2 at my school), so in my third year I switched into something else and I decided to do a 5th year to boost my grades. My 3rd, 4th, and 5th years will all have A averages. Nonetheless, my cGPA will only be about a 3.3 (with my L2 at about 3.85). I am wondering if my reason for such a low cGPA (and my recognition that I was simply in the wrong major) will help admissions committees be more understanding of my cgpa. Or will it not really matter? Kind of a vague question I know, but any input would be greatly helpful. Thanks!
    • Is it possible to get accommodations for the LSAT? I feel like this is very much something they should work with, because it sounds like you are a completely compétent student despite your injury, and a standardized test should not hold you back.    That or apply to McGill, where your grades are good and they don’t need an LSAT (I think)
    • For UBC you could get a better gauge of your chances if you converted your GPA into % form. There's an index calculator that's stickied on the UBC forum - as far as I know it does a pretty good job at predicting your chances. Overall your stats are great. It's definitely worth applying there.
    • they recommended a Nov write, however they take Jan write as latest write. On their site: LSAT scores for the past 5 years may be used. To apply to enter the program in 2021, it is strongly recommended that the LSAT is written by November 2020. The LSAT must be written in January 2021 at the latest. https://www.ryerson.ca/law/admissions/application-requirements/

×
×
  • Create New...