Jump to content
dontplay

LSBC Member Resolution - Articling Employment Standards

Recommended Posts

Quote

To amend the appropriate sections of the Law Society Rules and/or Code of Professional Conduct within 12 months of the date of this resolution, requiring that articled student agreements provide articled students with at least such rights and protections as are guaranteed under section 16 and Parts 4 and 5 of the Employment Standards Act, RSBC 1996, c 113, and ensure that articled students are able to seek financial redress for practices that contravene the amended Law Society Rules and/or Code of Professional Conduct

Thoughts on this? I think the biggest concern raised so far is that it will reduce the supply of articling positions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Architect interns aren't excluded.  That internship goes on for three to five years.  They seem to be able to make it work.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully BC leads on this and Ontario follows. I get the concern that fewer articling positions will potentially be available, and it's a valid concern, but...... something's gotta give here. We've been allowing articling students to be treated like crap for so long, and never taking substantial strides forward to help address that power imbalance out of a fear that already shitty articling principals are going to pull out of the articling program because they now have to be less shitty.

 

Are there any greater incentives that can be offered by the Law Societies to induce lawyers to take on articling students who otherwise aren't financially able to? Heck, that's something I'd support my massive LSO fees (and soon-to-be LSBC fees) going toward: generous grants to firms so they can better afford an articling student's salary. There has to be something the Law Societies can do to help get the shitty principals who balk at the idea of treating their articling students a little better out of the mix, and get better principals in there in their place.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I regard the concern that this will lead to fewer articling positions the same as the concern that minimum wage laws in general lead to fewer job opportunities – i.e., not highly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, CoteDissenting said:

I regard the concern that this will lead to fewer articling positions the same as the concern that minimum wage laws in general lead to fewer job opportunities – i.e., not highly.

This is a good point. The only caveat would be that articling students are regarded as less productive to firms than minimum wage workers are to enterprises. Though this has always just been claimed by lawyers to me, and I've never seen quantified numbers on it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CoteDissenting said:

I regard the concern that this will lead to fewer articling positions the same as the concern that minimum wage laws in general lead to fewer job opportunities – i.e., not highly.

Articling students can be a financial burden and aren't necessary for the success of a firm/business. Whereas employees are a necessary part of a business that is looking to expand and generate income beyond what a sole owner/operator can earn.

Allow me to pop in my monocle and twirl my moustache while holding a bag with "$" written on it....

If I own a mom and pop business and I need more hands to help me expand and make more money, I'll have to suck it up and pay at least minimum wage to bring in employees to accomplish my goal. If minimum wage increases, I'll have to make a judgement call and balance my desire to expand and supply my current clients vs. refusing to pay a higher wage to my employees. 

Whereas with a law firm, I don't need an articling student. Recruitment, fees, and mentorship can be costly. If I want to make more money and expand, I'll hire more lawyers who can bring in clients and practice without any guidance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, setto said:

Articling students can be a financial burden and aren't necessary for the success of a firm/business. Whereas employees are a necessary part of a business that is looking to expand and generate income beyond what a sole owner/operator can earn.

Allow me to pop in my monocle and twirl my moustache while holding a bag with "$" written on it....

If I own a mom and pop business and I need more hands to help me expand and make more money, I'll have to suck it up and pay at least minimum wage to bring in employees to accomplish my goal. If minimum wage increases, I'll have to make a judgement call and balance my desire to expand and supply my current clients vs. refusing to pay a higher wage to my employees. 

Whereas with a law firm, I don't need an articling student. Recruitment, fees, and mentorship can be costly. If I want to make more money and expand, I'll hire more lawyers who can bring in clients and practice without any guidance. 

This is true, though I suspect, albeit with only anecdotal evidence, that the firms that invest in recruitment and mentorship are not the ones that will have to change their practices if this resolution has its intended effect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the difference between offering an articling position and not offering a position is that you have to respect basic employment laws, then you probably shouldn't have an articling student. 

The idea that articling students, who are among society's hardest working and most educated young people, are worth less than a McDonald's worker has always been absurd to me.

Outside of a few exceptions (thinking of criminal law here because of the general problems in criminal defence) good articling experiences already pay more than minimum wage.

 

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are certain on-call realities to Crim defence articles, but the fact that employers would have to acknowledge that these are “extra” and figure out a way to deal with them seems an entirely reasonable proposition, especially if the alternative (and current reality) is that students just have to lump it. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a note that Alberta articling students have been entitled to the minimum wage for decades, so this is not a novel idea....

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I am a career advisor for law students and articling students who wish to obtain an objective advice on career, resume-building and interviewing techniques. Having worked in big law, multinational corporation, as well as boutiques and having run my own law firm, I can provide a balanced perspective on legal career paths. I also have resources and referrals that can be provided should the student wish to be connected with mentors of specific areas of practice. If you are interested, contact me at [email protected] 
    • I am currently a student in the UBC-Sciences Po Dual Degree program. I spent the first two years of my degree at Sciences Po Paris and am concluding my final two years at UBC. At the end, I will graduate with two BAs (one from each university).  Does anyone have experience with navigating law school applications with a dual bachelor's degree, especially if one of the institutions you studied at was foreign?  In particular, I anticipate that a major challenge would lie in the calculation of my GPA over the course of my studies given half of my grades will be in terms of French grading standards and the other half in terms of UBC's grading standards, if an overall calculation can even be made. I am also unsure as to how drops would be calculated in my case.  Explaining the dual degree program and why my transcripts look the way they do is probably going to be another obstacle seeing as the program is relatively small and unknown, but I anticipate that I would have the space to do this in my personal statement. I'm not sure if I'd need to provide any corroborating information besides that, however.  Thank you in advance for your help.
    • I am a career advisor for law students and articling students who wish to obtain an objective advice on career, resume-building and interviewing techniques. Having worked in big law, multinational corporation, as well as boutiques and having run my own law firm, I can provide a balanced perspective on legal career paths. I also have resources and referrals that can be provided should the student wish to be connected with mentors of specific areas of practice. If you are interested, contact me at [email protected]
    • Does it matter when you submit your application? I'm in group B and submitted applications about an hour or two before the deadline. Haven't heard anything yet
    • Thanks for sharing! Best of luck with your application!

×
×
  • Create New...