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Legalhope

Opinion - Bond University remote

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Also I used the law school application assistant for the numbers. Different numbers than I had previously. I'm not sure why there is a discrepancy. 

What can I say - I seriously screwed up first year - a fail, DNC, and grades around the 60s (and apparently I was very very average in second year)

 

Cumulative: 2.47
L2: 2.84
B3: 2.79
Edited by Legalhope
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Those numbers tell a very different story from the one you described in your opening post:

On 9/1/2020 at 9:15 AM, Legalhope said:

My grades show a substantial upward swing in year 3 and 4. I have 80s and 90s in 4th year

Something doesn't add up there, unless the 80s and 90s were outliers among mostly substandard grades.

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My program had low course averages throughout the 4 years of undergrad (B- to C+ - which translates to 67-72% on the U of T scale).

My grades were consistent with course averages. 

So yes, the 80s and 90s are outliers compared to the high 60s to mid-70s through the rest of my time there. 

Hindsight is 20/20. I would have been better off in an easier program to get a higher GPA. 

 

Edited by Legalhope
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It would be difficult to get into a Canadian university with a below 3.0 GPA across all years. If you could get high 160's and apply discretionary, you may have a shot. Otherwise, a foreign school would be your only option. I would ask yourself if law is really right for you though. The people you would be competing with come with high undergrad GPAs and a high LSAT, many without putting in much effort.

I admit that grades and LSAT are not everything, but know that they are an indicator of your learning capabilities and that it may be an uphill battle, especially coming from a foreign law school.

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The more information that OP provides, the more I'm inclined to not recommend pursuing law school.

From my distant perspective, Canadian law schools are a long shot with that GPA and a sub-par LSAT score that's unlikely to improve. And foreign law schools aren't worth the opportunity cost given their expense (tuition and lost income) and the salary expectations after graduating, especially for someone who owns a home, has dependents, and already has a job.

OP, this is just my honest opinion as someone with no skin in the game. A decision like this involves more than calculations, because like you said, you've wanted to be a lawyer for a long time.

None of us can know what you really feel, so none of us can really know if it will be worth it to you in the end. Everything that's been said is likely true for the average law school hopeful, but you're not a data point, you're a person.

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On 9/1/2020 at 4:48 PM, Legalhope said:

For what it's worth, my reading comprehension portion started at 19+ correct and was consistently 22+ correct at the end. This has always been the easiest section for me. 

It's the games I struggle with. I have to battle my way through them line by line. I lose a lot of time in that section. I have improved in this section but if my diagram is wrong, it snowballs with incorrect answers. Calling them games is sick and twisted 🙂

For the remainder of logical reasoning, I always get down to the final 2. The correct answer is always in my final selection. Again I have improved in this section.

I know what types of questions I struggle with. And I've studied them. Ultimately I'm not consistently breaking 155-160 as a mature student. Even if I score 160+ I am struggling against a 2.48 cGPA. It isn't just about the LSAT in my scenario.

More than one  of my rejection letters have explicitly stated my GPA and LSAT were not competitive. Either in general or mature. Not one or the other. Both. 

Would you continue to study, retake LSAT and reapply again, knowing your GPA still doesn't make the cut?

 

 

Learn logic games. Everyone is capable of doing well on the logic games section (unless they have an actual deficit in learning or intelligence). That is a fact. 
 

I’m almost certain you haven’t put the right sort of work in to learn them. They are very formulaic. 
 

 While you’re doing that, do two years of additional university studies, then go to a Canadian law school that considers second degrees. 
 

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On 9/3/2020 at 12:29 PM, Legalhope said:

Also I used the law school application assistant for the numbers. Different numbers than I had previously. I'm not sure why there is a discrepancy. 

You probably weren't calculating your GPA properly, or you weren't using the OLSAS scale. The OLSAS scale punishes inconsistency. If you have a lot of grades between B+ and A- or between B- and C+, you lose a lot more grade points than if you had a lot of grades between a B+ and a B, or a C+ and a C. It's just the nature of the scale. Your numbers will be way off your university-calculated average, or the average on your transcript.

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