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Gandhi

What's your go-to letter closing?

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1 hour ago, Gandhi said:

I have decided to go with this with respect to emails. I feel liberated already.

Just you wait until you drop the "Hello/Hi/Good morning [Name]" too. Enough with the pleasantries. Get right to the content! 

Bad email:

Dear Ms. Johnson,

Per our earlier conversation, we discussed the following settlement offer: $5000 and discontinuance. 

As we discussed, I advised that we should consider the following actions and I recommended the settlement for the following reasons ...[etc. blah blah blah].

[More CYA stuff].

Very most truly yours,

Mr. Arthur Vandelay, esq.

Good email:

Lydia, your case sucks just settle. My bill for this is $1,200, but you get a 25% discount cause your nephew fixed my car, so that's $900. Cash only.

-A

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While we are doing this, can be all please address the not uncommon practice of people printing and signing letters and then scanning and attaching them to emails? Why you do this. Never do this at me. Just type an email.

Edited by BringBackCrunchBerries
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Dictated but not read,

as per:

 

__________________________________________________

Mountebank, or an agent, assign, creditor, etc.

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50 minutes ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

While we are doing this, can be all please address the not uncommon practice of people printing and signing letters and then scanning and attaching them to emails? Why you do this. Never do this at me. Just type an email.

I have a jpeg of my signature that I just insert into the letter if it needs to be signed. SAVE THE TREES!

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But do you insert the signature into a letter, create a pdf, then attach it to an email that reads "Please see the attached correspondence from BertyBewp."?

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I'm just about to start articling, but have worked in public-relations/communications-type jobs. I have seen or used, at some point, each of the following:

- Cheers (this is my default)

- Best (I end up using this when "cheers" seems inappropriate given the topic of the email)

- Sincerely (when letter-writing/ addressing clients for first time)

- Thanks (asking a peer for something)

- Thank you for your time (asking someone I report to for something)

- Warm regards (I've never used this, but profs sometimes use it???)

- Kind regards (ditto)

- Kindly (I hate this)

- In solidarity through our struggle (for a romantic partner, obviously)

- Lukewarm regards (for the person administering my student line of credit at the bank)

- Your fervent disciple (for cult leader)

- Don't look right behind you (opposing counsel)

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1 hour ago, Jaggers said:

But do you insert the signature into a letter, create a pdf, then attach it to an email that reads "Please see the attached correspondence from BertyBewp."?

... yes. 😬

But if I didn't do that, I'd never have an opportunity to use our fancy letterhead!

Edited by BertyBewp
the letterhead is really nice you guys

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A partner I do work for is a big fan of printing out letters, signing them, scanning them (at a low resolution) and emailing the PDF. I don’t get it when our computer system has convert to PDF right in the right-click menu.

For emails I mostly use regards, best regards or thanks. Sometimes I just put my first name with no closing.

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If I feel like I might want to include it in a motion or other court doc, it’s nice to be able to carve out a stand alone letter. There are just to many instances of navigating the “if you look at the start of this email, which is halfway down the 3rd page, please ignore the 3000 confidentiality footers and “please consider the environment before printing” stamps that I’ve now printed out” to make me want to avoid emails for any formal/important positions. 

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Totally understand why some things are better put in a letter than email. I just don’t get the print-sign-scan-email thing versus an electronic signature and just emailing the electronic version of the letter.

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After having oc put my emails into affidavits, I changed my email signature to include a clear warning that settlement privilege applies when settlement privilege applies and the only "with prejudice" communications you will receive from me will appear in the form of a letter on the firm's letterhead. So on those occasions I write my letter, print it and attach it to my email.

I wish I didn't have to do that, but some lawyers are real dicks.

 

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I try to mirror the formality or lack of the sender, if replying. E.g. if they wrote in email "Hi, firstname" I do likewise, usually. Letters, attached or otherwise, generally much more formal of course. Just like I've gotten emails to me by firstname, with very formal letter attached.

If mirroring not applicable e.g. because I'm originating, close with Best Regards, or Regards even if less formal opening like "Hello All". I avoid yours truly and variations usually, in part because of etymology, it historically suggests the person using that closing is superior - for that reason I may sometimes deliberately use it with some...:rolleyes: 

If they've provided info or something, even if obliged to, typically "Thanks, and Best Regards". If around a holiday, or when Covid lockdowns first beginning, I might add something about holiday or wishing continued good health.

If dealing with someone in QC, even if the body of the email is in English, I'll typically open with Bonjour and close with a bientot. If group is a mix, "Hello and Bonjour All" opening, "Best Regards et a bientot" closing.

Aside, I hate the practice some have of addressing admins by firstname (e.g. when sending an email with documents to admin directly as requested) but their bosses more formally. If an admin person closes with first name, I'll reply accordingly, but close with just my first name (and, in a couple of cases, have explicitly told them, just my first name is fine - in one case, dealing with American, they thanked me but said their direction was all lawyers addressed formally with "Esq." after their name, so I lived with it, didn't want to create difficulty for them based on my principles. In some cases, especially around holidays, I've explicitly included greetings to admin person copied on an email not addressed to them, if I've dealt directly with them before.

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21 hours ago, FineCanadianFXs said:

Mr. Arthur Vandelay, esq.

... and you want to be my latex salesman ...

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Neil Guthrie says in his Guide to Better Legal Writing that you shouldn’t formally open or close emails or letters. I write letters to counsel and the court every day and I never open or close them formally. I address the person at the top by their name, and then close with mine. That’s it.

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On 9/2/2020 at 3:33 PM, Chrysander said:

Neil Guthrie says in his Guide to Better Legal Writing that you shouldn’t formally open or close emails or letters. I write letters to counsel and the court every day and I never open or close them formally. I address the person at the top by their name, and then close with mine. That’s it.

I do this for emails but for letters that seems terse.

I occasionally put inanities in my emails (have a great weekend) and the thing I end up sometimes struggling with is if I should put an exclamation mark or not on those.

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I close with a signature block that lists every single degree / qualification I have ever picked up in my life.

 

:)

 

 

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On 9/1/2020 at 4:41 PM, wakawaka said:

Totally understand why some things are better put in a letter than email. I just don’t get the print-sign-scan-email thing versus an electronic signature and just emailing the electronic version of the letter.

Ah. I see you have encountered what we like to call “old people”.

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