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ms123

Special Consideration Applicant (TRU)

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Hi,

The TRU Website states "Because of special circumstances in life, you may not satisfy one or more requirements of a regular applicant and may seek admission under the Special Consideration category."

I was wondering If I can I apply as a special consideration applicant if I meet all the requirements but am a POC/First Generation Canadian/ First Generation University Student/ first female to attend post secondary in the family? I'm wondering is this is similar to a diversity statement or of it only applied to prospective students who don't meet their criteria.

 

Thanks in advance!

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I believe this category is more geared towards applicants who have a low GPA, low LSAT, or no ECs as a way to explain why that is, e.g. low GPA due to being a full-time single mom raising two kids while still pursuing a degree, had bad grades and had to drop out 2 years in due to mental health but picked it back up and got great grades, etc. If your GPA or LSAT is low, but you think you have a valid reason why and can explain how you will still be able to succeed in law school in spite of your below average grades, then you may qualify for "Special Consideration." From what I've seen, the special consideration categories are more for explaining academic discrepancies (though anyone, feel free to chime in and correct me). 

I think your circumstances would be better spoken about in the regular Personal Statement for whatever the standard category is.

Edited by castlepie
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On 8/15/2020 at 10:08 PM, ms123 said:

Hi,

The TRU Website states "Because of special circumstances in life, you may not satisfy one or more requirements of a regular applicant and may seek admission under the Special Consideration category."

I was wondering If I can I apply as a special consideration applicant if I meet all the requirements but am a POC/First Generation Canadian/ First Generation University Student/ first female to attend post secondary in the family? I'm wondering is this is similar to a diversity statement or of it only applied to prospective students who don't meet their criteria.

 

Thanks in advance!

Hello,

I have applied to TRU and have been accepted. I would use that in your personal statement because that is not a special consideration. You are not the only person who is the first. Special considerations is for people who have disabilities, etc ^ like the person from the top stated. 
 

If you have any questions about TRU, you are welcome to message me. 

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Being an immigrant and bipoc would seem to satisfy the “membership in a historically disadvantaged group” criteria for the special considerations category, no? 

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1 hour ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Being an immigrant and bipoc would seem to satisfy the “membership in a historically disadvantaged group” criteria for the special considerations category, no? 

If your an immigrant then yes you can probably discuss how you immigrated to Canada and how it put you at a disadvantage 

Edited by Mydream123

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Just now, Mydream123 said:

If your an immigrant and bipoc, then yes. 

OP said she is, didn’t she:

On 8/15/2020 at 11:08 PM, ms123 said:

I was wondering If I can I apply as a special consideration applicant if I meet all the requirements but am a POC/First Generation Canadian

Am I missing something? 

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9 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

OP said she is, didn’t she:

Am I missing something? 

POC = person of colour, not an immigrant. 
 

Immigrant - a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.

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2 minutes ago, Mydream123 said:

POC = person of colour, not an immigrant. 
 

Immigrant - a person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.

POC being the POC part of biPOC

First generation Canadian being an immigrant, contrasted with second generation Canadians, who are the children of immigrants. 

Am I going crazy? What’s going on in this thread? 

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20 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

POC being the POC part of biPOC

First generation Canadian being an immigrant, contrasted with second generation Canadians, who are the children of immigrants. 

Am I going crazy? What’s going on in this thread? 

I used to enjoy reading your posts, but something's gotten into you lately. Why pick fights with people every time anyone brings up a remotely debatable point? 

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5 minutes ago, Tagger said:

I used to enjoy reading your posts, but something's gotten into you lately. Why pick fights with people every time anyone brings up a remotely debatable point? 

I’m not picking a fight, I’m honestly confused. I read OPs post and thought they were surely eligible for the special considerations category, but the advice they’ve gotten is that they’re not. 

I’m not even sure what you think is the debatable point here. OP seems to me to clearly qualify, so if the advice is that they don’t I’m either missing something (and thus I’m wrong) or the advice is wrong (and if the advice is wrong, that’s important information that OP should know).

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

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28 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Am I going crazy? What’s going on in this thread?

You're going crazy. Take a breather please

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Just now, BlockedQuebecois said:

Mind explaining what I’m missing? 

I think castlepie's post makes sense, as being an immigrant and a biPOC isnt considered as one of the examples listed for the special consideration applicants for TRU:

"Because of special circumstances in life, you may not satisfy one or more requirements of a regular applicant and may seek admission under the Special Consideration category. This category of admission usually requires supplemental documentation. Examples of special circumstances in life include: disability or special needs, financial disadvantage, age, membership in a historically disadvantaged group, residency in a small and/or remote community, or any other factors that you would ask the Admissions Committee to consider."

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33 minutes ago, Thrive92 said:

I think castlepie's post makes sense, as being an immigrant and a biPOC isnt considered as one of the examples listed for the special consideration applicants for TRU:

"Because of special circumstances in life, you may not satisfy one or more requirements of a regular applicant and may seek admission under the Special Consideration category. This category of admission usually requires supplemental documentation. Examples of special circumstances in life include: disability or special needs, financial disadvantage, age, membership in a historically disadvantaged group, residency in a small and/or remote community, or any other factors that you would ask the Admissions Committee to consider."

Are BIPOC not included in "a historically disadvantaged group"? 

Edited by Sherb
grammar
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1 hour ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

First generation Canadian being an immigrant

Colloquially, people say "first generation" both when referring to immigrants and the children of immigrants. As the child of immigrants, despite the fact that I was born in Canada, I get called "first generation" a lot.

I would not assume that OP is an immigrant unless they specifically said so, because the colloquial use of "first generation" is too ambiguous.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immigrant_generations#First_generation

Edited by canuckfanatic
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1 minute ago, Sherb said:

Is BIPOC not included in "a historically disadvantaged group"? 

sorry; i must have overlooked that part. my apologies.

i stand corrected; bipoc is included in “a historically disadvantaged group”

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3 minutes ago, Sherb said:

Is BIPOC not included in "a historically disadvantaged group"? 

It is, but it's more nuanced than that. I'm a POC but it would have been silly for me to have applied under "special considerations" for that reason alone, because I grew up in an upper-middle class family with a lot of privileges. As an individual you need to evaluate your own life's circumstances and decide whether you need special consideration.

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1 minute ago, canuckfanatic said:

It is, but it's more nuanced than that. I'm a POC but it would have been silly for me to have applied under "special considerations" for that reason alone, because I grew up in an upper-middle class family with a lot of privileges. As an individual you need to evaluate your own life's circumstances and decide whether you need special consideration.

I see. I'm a POC as well, so I appreciate your elaboration!

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I want to add that TRU admissions does not know the race/ethnicity of any applicants unless it's obvious from the name or it's specifically mentioned in the personal statement. If you're BIPOC and don't feel that you should apply in the special considerations category, you may find it helpful to address your experience as part of that group in your personal statement.

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20 minutes ago, canuckfanatic said:

It is, but it's more nuanced than that. I'm a POC but it would have been silly for me to have applied under "special considerations" for that reason alone, because I grew up in an upper-middle class family with a lot of privileges. As an individual you need to evaluate your own life's circumstances and decide whether you need special consideration.

It’s quite common for bipoc individuals from upper class or upper-middle class families to apply via the special considerations or similar categories, just for other readers. 

Thank you for the information re: first generation immigrants 

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