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Thrive92

Pretty much zero ECs...Should I give up on TRU?

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Hello everyone. Prospective law student here.

Over the years of my undergraduate I did pretty much nothing but be at school. No work, no volunteering; just focusing on my academics.

As the admission cycle that I am planning on is nearing, I am worried that TRU wouldn't even look at my application because of my lack of extra curriculars....should I just give up on TRU/any holistic law schools?

I'm looking at the accepted/rejected threads, and both of them contain posts with applicants with stellar ECs (working/volunteering at law firms, etc). I'm starting to really regret not taking an active part outside of my schoolwork, as TRU law is my main choice for law.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

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12 minutes ago, Thrive92 said:

Hello everyone. Prospective law student here.

Over the years of my undergraduate I did pretty much nothing but be at school. No work, no volunteering; just focusing on my academics.

As the admission cycle that I am planning on is nearing, I am worried that TRU wouldn't even look at my application because of my lack of extra curriculars....should I just give up on TRU/any holistic law schools?

I'm looking at the accepted/rejected threads, and both of them contain posts with applicants with stellar ECs (working/volunteering at law firms, etc). I'm starting to really regret not taking an active part outside of my schoolwork, as TRU law is my main choice for law.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

If you have competitive stats, i.e. a strong LSAT score and a decent cGPA, you should be in TRU. No worries. 

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Posted (edited)

Volunteering at a law firm isn't a stellar EC. You can answer phones anywhere. 

A small minority of applicants actually have stellar ECs; everyone else only thinks they do because they're working with a sample size of 1. 

Edited by Tagger
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19 minutes ago, ArchivesandMuseums said:

If you have competitive stats, i.e. a strong LSAT score and a decent cGPA, you should be in TRU. No worries. 

Right now im sitting on 3.6 L2 GPA (hopefully the upcoming fall semester will increase that to a 3.7) and my PT LSAT score is still in the works... (I applied for the October LSAT). What do you think my chances of being admitted would be for 3.7 L2 and 155 LSAT? No ECs

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19 minutes ago, Tagger said:

Volunteering at a law firm isn't a stellar EC. You can answer phones anywhere. 

A small minority of applicants actually have stellar ECs; everyone else only thinks they do because they're working with a sample size of 1. 

Sorry I should have clarified. stellar EC in compared to mine

 

so its a sample size of 2!

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2 minutes ago, Thrive92 said:

Right now im sitting on 3.6 L2 GPA (hopefully the upcoming fall semester will increase that to a 3.7) and my PT LSAT score is still in the works... (I applied for the October LSAT). What do you think my chances of being admitted would be for 3.7 L2 and 155 LSAT? No ECs

I did not apply to TRU, so I am not sure if I would be able to give you a meaningful insight into TRU's admission. (I only applied to Ontario law schools.) That being said, I do not think that you may have a decent chance at TRU with 3.7 L2 and 155 LSAT (the score is hypothetical, right?); given that your stats are not excellent and you do not have any noteworthy ECs, you need to get an LSAT score of 160+ to have good chances at TRU. (In addition, as far as I know, TRU will not focus on your L2 GPA.) TRU's admission policy seems to be quite holistic; thus, although I am not sure about your chances, you need to improve your stats. 

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1 minute ago, ArchivesandMuseums said:

I did not apply to TRU, so I am not sure if I would be able to give you a meaningful insight into TRU's admission. (I only applied to Ontario law schools.) That being said, I do not think that you may have a decent chance at TRU with 3.7 L2 and 155 LSAT (the score is hypothetical, right?); given that your stats are not excellent and you do not have any noteworthy ECs, you need to get an LSAT score of 160+ to have good chances at TRU. (In addition, as far as I know, TRU will not focus on your L2 GPA.) TRU's admission policy seems to be quite holistic; thus, although I am not sure about your chances, you need to improve your stats. 

TRU does look at your last 20 courses, but you are right; 155 LSAT is just not good enough I dont think :(

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Also a prospective law student myself, and someone with unspectacular ECs (minimum wage jobs every summer except one where I volunteered, and nothing else except hobbies). Here's what I'd suggest: if you do better than expected on the exam, go ahead and apply. If not, you can always just apply in a year or two instead and get more work experience/ECs in between then and now, and retake the LSAT if you need to. You don't have to get this work experience at a law firm.

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7 minutes ago, lh22 said:

Also a prospective law student myself, and someone with unspectacular ECs (minimum wage jobs every summer except one where I volunteered, and nothing else except hobbies). Here's what I'd suggest: if you do better than expected on the exam, go ahead and apply. If not, you can always just apply in a year or two instead and get more work experience/ECs in between then and now, and retake the LSAT if you need to. You don't have to get this work experience at a law firm.

Thank you for the advice cat. Be careful of the knife!

I was thinking that if the LSAT score from October is not what I expected, I would apply for the January one as a last - minute resort to be admitted for the 2021 cycle.

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12 minutes ago, Thrive92 said:

Thank you for the advice cat. Be careful of the knife!

I was thinking that if the LSAT score from October is not what I expected, I would apply for the January one as a last - minute resort to be admitted for the 2021 cycle.

I did the exam fine and I'm just a cat, 🗡️ so don't sweat it too much. Study hard but don't overdo things.

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With a 160+ LSAT, I would say you had a shot regardless of any ECs. I believe that TRU weighs GPA, LSAT, and ECs almost equally. From my own observations, I think you need to be strong in 2/3 categories and at least mediocre in the third to have a shot.

I had a strong LSAT and strong ECs and mediocre GPA and I got in back in 2017. You have a good GPA, mediocre LSAT, and no ECs which makes it a long shot from my perspective.

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On 8/11/2020 at 11:27 PM, canuckfanatic said:

With a 160+ LSAT, I would say you had a shot regardless of any ECs. I believe that TRU weighs GPA, LSAT, and ECs almost equally. From my own observations, I think you need to be strong in 2/3 categories and at least mediocre in the third to have a shot.

I had a strong LSAT and strong ECs and mediocre GPA and I got in back in 2017. You have a good GPA, mediocre LSAT, and no ECs which makes it a long shot from my perspective.

thank you for the input :) My LSAT practice test scores are abysmal, so it would take quite an effort to pull off a 160+ I think.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Thrive92 said:

thank you for the input :) My LSAT practice test scores are abysmal, so it would take quite an effort to pull off a 160+ I think.

The average GPA was 3.7 / 4.33  (L20) and  The average LSAT is 160. With no ECs / work experience you will have a long shot.

I suggest you apply to SasK as well.

Once you get 160+ a lot of doors will open for you (Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba, UNB, DAL, etc).

Edited by NeverGiveUp

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3 hours ago, NeverGiveUp said:

The average GPA was 3.7 / 4.33  (L20) and  The average LSAT is 160. With no ECs / work experience you will have a long shot.

I suggest you apply to SasK as well.

Once you get 160+ a lot of doors will open for you (Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba, UNB, DAL, etc).

Where did you find the average stats for TRU? I have been trying to find this info to figure out my chances. 

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12 minutes ago, Shiftsandgiggles said:

Where did you find the average stats for TRU? I have been trying to find this info to figure out my chances. 

Here you go:

 

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6 hours ago, NeverGiveUp said:

Here you go:

 

Take this with a salt shaker, the sample size alone makes this pretty much useless.

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9 hours ago, AJD19 said:

EC's aren't too big a deal

Are you sure friend? You were admitted into U of A, which is known to be an almost all - stats school for general applicants

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