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1 hour ago, Aschenbach said:

For LR: I tried to answer all questions within 20 minutes, skipping any that seem difficult. Which questions fall into this category requires a bit of fine-tuning, but after a few practice exams, you can figure out when you're spending too much time on a question. I would dedicate the remaining 15 minutes to go back and work on the questions I skipped. In any given LR section, I would skip anywhere from 4-6 questions to go back to later.

For LG: I'd split the game board as much as possible. Answer specific questions first as opposed to general (these are the ones that ask if x is in slot 3, which of the following could/must be true). This has the benefit of creating more possible scenarios that may help you answer general questions faster. I also did weird games last (newer LSATs usually have one game where the setup is kind of strange). I divided my time so that easy games had a time limit of 7.5 minutes each and hard games had a time limit of 10 minutes each. 

For RC: I always did the double passages last as those took the most time and I got the most wrong with them. I also allotted more time for double passages than regular passages.

Basically my strategy was try to get as many of the low-hanging fruit as possible first before attempting hard questions. I think this had the overall effect of getting 7-8 more questions right that pushed my score up by five points between my first and second take. Again, this was what worked for me, but may not work for someone else. I think you need to try a few different things to see what works for you. Don't be afraid to try new things. It involves a lot of repetition and minute changes that will hopefully lead to a better score.

I love this, tangible and practical LSAT tips. I'm totally going to try this, I think it makes a lot of sense and is similar to how I approach things. Thanks so much!

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Back in 2015 my diagnostic was 159. I did an online course with PowerScore, wrote a bunch of PTs, and got a 164 on my first attempt in October 2015, which was 90th percentile. Not a drastic improvement over my diagnostic but still pretty good, and enough to get me into law school.

My sister went to law school before me and she had a 167 on the LSAT, so I thought I'd write it again just for the sake of competition. Unfortunately, competition wasn't a great motivator by the time I wrote again in June 2016. With a solid score in my pocket already, I half-assed my prep for the 2nd write and scored a 160.

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I started in the high 150s and ended in the low 170s. 

I had a terrible study plan at first. I bought the 10 actuals and figured I would improve by banging out timed practice tests one after another. 0/10 would not recommend. 

I ended up using a combinations of books (Blueprint for Logic Games, and LSAT Trainer for LR and RC). I also used 7 sage to generate problem sets in the last 2 months of studying (I probably should have done this sooner). 

LG: I used the blueprint book and worked through it. As I was working through it my score was trending upwards but I hit a plateau around -5. What helped me break through the plateau was practice by building custom problem sets on 7 sage. I started with individual game types, gradually doing more difficult games, until I could easily do 4 sequencing games, and then 4 grouping games in the allotted time.  Then I did sets with games that where amenable to scenarios (i.e. there are only 3-4 different scenarios that work so it was worth it to fully explore each on up front). I struggled with recognizing this before, and doing a bunch in a row helped me identify them in PTs when they came up. Finally I made custom sets of 4 games with only hard or very hard games and I would try to do them in 35 minutes. In total I must have done around 200 games (including pts) and I scored -0 on my last 5 pts before the actual exam. 

LR: I worked through the LSAT Trainer. I found it to be helpful. I also generated a few practice on 7Sage with 25 hard and very hard LG questions (from early PTs not to soil the new tests) and I did them. I then did the blind review. I only did 2 sets like this, but nonetheless I found this helped me be more consistent. 

RC: Honestly I never really conquered this section, I definitely left two or three points on the table here. I ended up using the 7sage method of making a high level summary of each paragraph on my scrap paper. I feel this helped me be a little more consistent ( was having wild swings of -0 to -7 and everything in between). By making the summaries I tightened up my score a bit, although, I feel that the summaries where too time consuming for the comparative passage and didn't work as well.

I dedicated 3-4 hours on weekday evenings, and did 1 PT every weekend (sometimes 2) from March until June. If I had to do it all again I think I would just use 7sage with LSAT prep plus. I didn't go through the 7sage core curriculum, but I found the sections I used to be very clear. I enjoyed the interface and the ability to make custom problem sets. I would also spend more time trying to master the individual problem types instead of taking test after test hoping to improve by brute force. 

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While my LSAT glow-up isn't as impressive as that of some of the posters here, I'm still happy with it (provided I actually get in this year, lol). 

October 2019, I did my first ever test on Khan Academy completely cold and got a 150. For the next 3 months I did a lot of drills using Khan, but not very many practice tests. My score slowly crept up to the mid 150s when I did do full tests. Late November I burnt out. I picked study back up in January using PowerScore with paper tests and got a 163, and even though I didn't break back into the 160s again for awhile, it motivated me. Then I burnt out for a second time come March, and did very little studying again until June started. All my PTs in June ranged from 160 - 164, except the very last one (PT 89 I think?), which was a 153 two days before the July exam. Oh boy did my confidence love that. I was also worried because it was Flex, so it was only 1/3 my best section instead of 2/4. Come test day I scored a 160 so I guess it worked out alright. Will retake only if I don't get an offer from anywhere this year.

Edited by lh22
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149 --> 151 --> 152 ---> 159 --> 163

Aftermy first three attempts coupled with a lower CGPA 3.34 I thought I was doomed. After applying in 2019 and being subsequently rejected for the 19-20 school year, I decided to work for the year in a legal related position. 

While working I dug deep -  did a lot of introspection regarding analyzing my own weaknesses, and went in with the mentality to kick the Lsat's proverbial ass. I worked really hard on analyzing my weaknesses obsessing over what I was missing, and gridning through the rigours that come along with working full time and studying for a stnadardized test - meanwhile gearing up to resubmit my application my November 2019 for consideration for the 20-21 cycle. I scored a 159 on my November exam - just shy of the 160 I wanted, and perhaps needed. Took the January exam in 2020 and scored a 163. It's funny how this works. When initially began my lsat journey, a 163 was the score I aimed and hoped for. In between my initial 149-163 were three years of painstaking anxiety, bouts with depression and self-doubt. People say that the lsat dies after you start law school - and this is very true. However, the amount of self-awareness this test has taught me with respect to being honest with myself and my weaknesses, along with the notion of building resilience, are skills that extend beyond being admitted. 

 

I was accepted to every Ontario school I applied to (I applied to all of them with the exception of UofT). 

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3 hours ago, Bboy12 said:

149 --> 151 --> 152 ---> 159 --> 163

Aftermy first three attempts coupled with a lower CGPA 3.34 I thought I was doomed. After applying in 2019 and being subsequently rejected for the 19-20 school year, I decided to work for the year in a legal related position. 

While working I dug deep -  did a lot of introspection regarding analyzing my own weaknesses, and went in with the mentality to kick the Lsat's proverbial ass. I worked really hard on analyzing my weaknesses obsessing over what I was missing, and gridning through the rigours that come along with working full time and studying for a stnadardized test - meanwhile gearing up to resubmit my application my November 2019 for consideration for the 20-21 cycle. I scored a 159 on my November exam - just shy of the 160 I wanted, and perhaps needed. Took the January exam in 2020 and scored a 163. It's funny how this works. When initially began my lsat journey, a 163 was the score I aimed and hoped for. In between my initial 149-163 were three years of painstaking anxiety, bouts with depression and self-doubt. People say that the lsat dies after you start law school - and this is very true. However, the amount of self-awareness this test has taught me with respect to being honest with myself and my weaknesses, along with the notion of building resilience, are skills that extend beyond being admitted. 

 

I was accepted to every Ontario school I applied to (I applied to all of them with the exception of UofT). 

You were accepted to Ottawa and Osgoode with your gpa? What were your softs?

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19 hours ago, VitalGiraffe said:

You were accepted to Ottawa and Osgoode with your gpa? What were your softs?

yes. Softs included masters MPA  + gov job in a legal and policy position. Applied General 

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Very nice, everyone.

All of these stories dispel the myth that an LSAT score is a measure of your ability as a person rather than a measure of how much you have prepared yourself.

There are obviously people who score 165+ with very little effort. And there seem to be people who have not had great results on their LSAT score despite great effort.

But the general summary seems to be that if you put in the time and effort, you can probably achieve a score to get you into a Canadian  law school no matter where you currently score on the LSAT. (Decent GPA is assumed; decent LSAT study strategy is assumed).

This is motivating to me because my previous official scores are 152 and 155. I am starting to get to where I want to be (160+). I have booked an LSAT for Oct 3.

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This thread is definitely inspirational and I am glad that SNAILs kicked it off! Far too often do I see test takers get discouraged way too early in their studying. It is clear that the LSAT does have some correlation with natural aptitude, but that is not nearly the same thing as saying that it is an accurate gauge of that aptitude the first time one takes the exam / first time studying / etc.

My own story is a 154-cold diagnostic, 160 PT range after the power-score bibles, and a 170 on test day after taking a course that I now instruct at! My co-instructor’s story is even more inspirational than myself (multiple writes at lower scores and a much higher final score), but I can’t share too many details as that is for him to provide (he’s on these boards though so maybe he’ll pop in). Actually, that goes for both of my co-instructors but Yoni’s story is already well known around these parts!

To be clear, not everyone will be able to perform well on the LSAT. It does take someone who is wired, at least in part, to manipulate and evaluate logic at speed. Not all are this way. That said, most can probably do much better than a cold diagnostic would have them believe. All they need is a little guidance, some prep materials, and a good dose of motivation!

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I just found out my August Flex score and am so happy that I can contribute to this thread!

I took my diagnostic last summer and got a 151. I wasn't too bad at logical reasoning and reading comprehension, but was abysmal at logic games - just completely lost.

I didn't start studying until this year, in May, when I bought a subscription to 7Sage. I went through all the core curriculum (studying rougly 2 hours a day) and then started doing prep tests. I did 12 overall. My lowest was a 157 and my highest was a 166. My average was 160-163, and my goal was a 160. I was doing 3 sections each test to practice for the Flex.

I figured out that logic games were still my biggest weakness, so for most of August those were what I focused on. I drilled problem set after problem set... occasionally stopping to cry about mauve tyrannosaurus and share LSAT memes with friends who had no idea what I was talking about.

Come test day I was more nervous than I'd ever been for pretty much anything ever. I did the test and thought I bombed it due to nerves. I was expecting to go below my PT average by a lot. Last night I was already preparing myself to register for November.

Imagine my surprise this morning when I checked my LSAC account to see a 166! 

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I’m so excited that I can contribute to this threat after receiving my score from the August flex this morning! 
 

My diagnostic back in January was about 153/154 I believe (didn’t record it anywhere but I’m pretty sure that was it). Through self-studying using Khan and the PS bibles I was able to get to the high 150s/low 160s by March. When the pandemic hit, I lost my job and all my uni classes went online. Upside? Unable to work, I had the time to take the much talked about Harvard Ready prep course. Turns out, everything you’ve heard is true. The instructors, the course material and the structure of the course are all phenomenally designed and executed. With a few weeks to go before the August test I found myself scoring in the 163-167 range with a few outliers (a 159, my final PT was a 161 and highest was a 168). On test day, I was nervous as all hell, thought I bombed RC and LR, GENUINELY thought that I was going to wake up this morning to a 158-163 if I was lucky (my personal threshold to not have to retake was a 160+). I was shocked to wake up to a 168!!! Fully cried, I am so grateful for the team at HR and to my friends and family as well as the support I’ve received on these forums. As someone with a lower cgpa, I needed to do fairly well on this test to even have a shot at law school. To those who write the test and feel like they bombed it, go easy on yourself because you truly never know. WOOO!!!! 

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I took a diagnostics test end of May and scored a 145. This summer, I worked full-time, worked on my research, volunteering, totally stupidly over committed myself the entire summer. Despite all of that, I scored a 161 on August LSAT. My highest PT before was a 164. I hope to push a little harder and score a ~165 in October. Stay tuned and keep grinding! 

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A bit of a different situation for me, my diagnostic after a couple fo weeks of studying was a 166.

Used the power score lg Bible to solidify games and did many practice tests for or and rc practice. 

Just got back a 177 for the August flex! :)

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149 --> 157 --> 159

 

My diagnostic was 139 and I finally got a score that I am happy with! The goal was 160 but I am happy to be done with the LSAT and where I ended up. 

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