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Scoring higher in LSAT Flex?

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I wrote the July LSAT Flex 2 weeks ago and got the results today. I did better than I had expected. I was consistently scoring 165~168 during PTs, and only occasionally 170. And given that people tend not to perform so well during the real test, tend to score up to 5 pts less than during PTs (or so I kept hearing), I was just hoping that I would get 165. But turned out I got 170! It totally made my day for a few minutes but then the ever skeptical side of me took over: is it because it's LSAT Flex?? I also know 2 other people who scored similarly, as in consistently ~165 and one occasionally 169, the other 170 during PTs. And their July LSAT Flex results were 169 and 170 respectively, exactly my story. Of course, these are just anecdotal cases, but is there a trend where people tend to score their PT highest during LSAT Flex?

Given the way LSAT score is calculated, I know that statistically a 170 during LSAT flex is still 97%, just like the regular LSAT. And LSAC has consistently claimed that results for LSAT Flex is the same as the regular LSAT, and so far no law schools had come out saying that they prefer the regular LSAT over LSAT Flex.

HOWEVER, could it be that there are more people taking the LSAT now because of the way it's administered, hence diluting the caliber of the test taker pool? Imagine previously you have 100 dedicated aspiring OLs taking LSAT, and you rank their performance; now you have 100 dedicated aspiring OLs taking LSAT PLUS 100 other students taking LSAT just for kicks, those would've ranked 100th previously might now ranked 150th/~25%. If that's the case, the 20/21 admission cycle might be more competitive than ever. If law schools have 100 spots to fill, and there are 200 applications, top 50% would get in; versus if law schools were to take in the 100 students and now there are 400 applications, only the top 25% would get in. 

Bottom line: I worry that my 170 from LSAT Flex might not worth as much as it usually does, or that high a score for this admission cycle, it might in reality only equals to a 165 from regular LSAT for previous admission cycle.

Please tell me if I'm crazy for thinking this way. I know that I have a tendency to over worry and nitpick even the best things. Maybe all this is just massive imposter syndrome, because I'm still a bit shocked that I did pretty well in LSAT.

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You might be overthinking this. 

LSAC mentioned that the sections aren't different than any other test (they're not easier is what I'm saying) so the short length may factor in a little but if you did so well on the flex I think you would've done more or less the same on the regular test as well. 

If you think about it, it's the same questions and format. No idea about the competitiveness of the 2021 cycle though. 

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law schools definitely will not care about if you wrote it normally or flex test. however, I do question if the flex is easier. Personally I think scores are going to be inflated this year because writing the test at home allows people to overcome two barriers; test-day anxiety (writing at home is much better) and having less sections (more focused, I usually struggled in the 5th section). It might mean you need a higher score to get into law school next year, but your 170 is definitely good. a 170 is a 170. with a decent GPA, a 170 gets you in everywhere in Canada. that score means you are technically eligible to be an LSAT tutor.... at least at Kaplan. 

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Posted (edited)

Do you excel at RC and games?

It’s my understanding that they are weighed a bit more in the 3 section flex than they would be on the standard LSAT due to the omission of the second LR section. As far as I know, LR on the flex is worth 33.3% as opposed to 50%, it’s weight on the standard LSAT.

My strongest section by far is LR (reading comp is my nemesis 😤 ) so I’m actually a bit worried my flex score will be lower than my PTs.

Edited by Toby1994
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I don't know if it's inherently easier, but it's no doubt different. You're of course writing in a more comfortable space, and there are fewer sections (on PTs I'm usually pretty tired by the last one). However, if you're better at one type of question than another, they're weighed equally on the Flex, so you won't have the advantage of an extra LR if you're better at those. 

That being said, I recently got my score and it's a lower percentile than it has been in previous years, according to Google, by two or three points. LR is my best section, and logic games are my worst, and I was worried that the equal balance would wreck my score. For some reason, I was able to get through AR really well on test day, and I got the lower end of my average PT score range.

You probably would've done similarly well on the regular LSAT, tbh. 

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17 hours ago, Toby1994 said:

Do you excel at RC and games?

It’s my understanding that they are weighed a bit more in the 3 section flex than they would be on the standard LSAT due to the omission of the second LR section. As far as I know, LR on the flex is worth 33.3% as opposed to 50%, it’s weight on the standard LSAT.

My strongest section by far is LR (reading comp is my nemesis 😤 ) so I’m actually a bit worried my flex score will be lower than my PTs.

I do pretty well in LG consistently, getting 0~-2. My RC and LR are a bit of wild card. During PTs, I score -2~-8 for RC and -2~-6 for LR, and usually when I do well I’m LR, I tend to do worse in RC, and vice versa. Hence my PT average is 165~168. Only very occasionally I’d do well in both LR and RC and scoring 170. I guess the stars were just lined up for me on the exam day.

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Thank you all for your kind words and comments. I feel much more reassured about my score now. 

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