Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
parkersophie

Should I retake the LSATs? (cGPA 2.84, L2~3.2, LSAT 167)

Recommended Posts

I'm a chemical engineering student class of 2020, with the possibility of applying access (I have major depressive disorder and treatment resistant depression and have been depressed for the past 6 years. It heavily effect my grades and my last year was really good and an upward trend can be seen) and I will be working for this year as an engineer. I was a varsity athlete in university and was also involved heavily with extracurriculars and had leadership roles in clubs and good summer jobs (summer student for a defence lawyer, volunteer at SickKids in their legal department, research co-op at BC cancer research centre). 

My stats are 2.84 cGPA, 3.2ish L2, LSAT 167. My practice tests were consistently coming in just under 170 or above it. I know I can probably score better, but will it make a huge difference? Should I register to write the LSAT again or apply with my current stats? I'm not picky in terms of which law school I go to - I'm worried I won't get in anywhere. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you ask me, a 170+ LSAT would make a difference in your application. For your reference, I have an engineering background with similar stats but a higher LSAT, and was accepted to a number of Canadian schools. I scored a 167 on my first go as well, but I'm glad I rewrote as I ended up with a 173. I do think it made a difference in my application.

My bigger concern, however, would be with your access claim. Can you demonstrate that you've been able to manage your condition effectively? It's my understanding that law school adcoms want to see evidence that you've figured out how to deal with the problem(s) that caused your poor performance. Naturally, they want to see that your performance from that time period is unrepresentative of how you would perform in law school. If you still have a chronic illness that, according to your description, can't be treated, then it could reflect negatively on your application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Cheech said:

If you ask me, a 170+ LSAT would make a difference in your application. For your reference, I have an engineering background with similar stats but a higher LSAT, and was accepted to a number of Canadian schools. I scored a 167 on my first go as well, but I'm glad I rewrote as I ended up with a 173. I do think it made a difference in my application.

My bigger concern, however, would be with your access claim. Can you demonstrate that you've been able to manage your condition effectively? It's my understanding that law school adcoms want to see evidence that you've figured out how to deal with the problem(s) that caused your poor performance. Naturally, they want to see that your performance from that time period is unrepresentative of how you would perform in law school. If you still have a chronic illness that, according to your description, can't be treated, then it could reflect negatively on your application.

Thank you for your advice!

My worst grades came when I was changing medication every month. Although I haven't yet found something that helps me, I have learnt to manage it a lot better and haven't done any medication the past year. The issue I found was that changing medication often had a really bad effect on my sleep, ability to eat and general mood and it changed so often I couldn't really get a sense of consistency to be able to manage it. I won't be going on medication but instead will be trying transcranial magnetic stimulation which doesn't have as severe side effects. I feel confident that my LSAT score and my last year of undergrad demonstrates my ability to achieve despite my chronic illness. 

Edited by parkersophie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I submitted 2 academic and 1 professional and saw that there were only two showing on the online application (1 ac 1 pro) so emailed them and they said it was just their system and all had been received! 
    • Thank you! When I made the post I was freaking out but I feel a little better now. I'm remembering all those PTs I thought I bombed but ended up doing great on. The only bad thing is that I guessed on 2 RC questions because I ran out of time. I applied to Windsor, Ottawa, Osgoode, Queen's, Western, UBC (doubtful unless I rock LSAT), McGill and U of T (also extremely unlikely lol). 
    • Your LSAT is above the mean for Queens and your B2 is either at or slightly below the mean as well. I wouldn’t be surprised at all if you got admitted this cycle.    Where else did you apply?   A 163 LSAT is solid by the way    
    • not good, that's why I need a phenomenal LSAT. CGPA is 3.33 but much higher (around 3.65-3.7) when considering UBC's drops and Queen's B2. I was waitlisted at Western and Osgoode last year. I might just keep the score and go back to school in the summer to take a few courses. My problem is that my performance went down in third/fourth year rather than first year so I feel like I need to prove my academic ability some how even if it does not hugely influence my overall GPA. idk though honestly. I don't think I bombed the LSAT but I dont think I got a 165-172 like my PTs.   EDIT: by taking a few courses I mean accept that I likely won't get in this year, target next year's cycle

×
×
  • Create New...