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tfox007

UK Law school NCAs

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Hi all,

Apologies if this has already been asked (if so, can you please kindly post the thread link? Thank you)

I am a recent grad from a UK law school from their "Senior Status" program and am now waiting for the NCA to resume to normal service so that they can send me the list of assessments I need to write. Having said that, are there any places that would hire a grad/ student like me to gain some legal Canadian experience? Obviously at this point money does not matter to me, and what matters most is the experience.

Thanks for going through my query! :) 

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Posted (edited)

There is ton of info on this site re. this question. Search around a bit and you'll find long, detailed discussions on this topic. 

Here is what I think will be the long and the short of it: Yes, maybe, but you won't know until you start looking and it's going to be an uphill battle. 

Edited by conge
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3 minutes ago, conge said:

There is ton of info on this site re. this question. Search around a bit and you'll find long, detailed discussions on this topic. 

Here is what I think will be the long and the short of it: Yes, maybe, but you won't know until you start looking and it's going to be an uphill battle. 

Thank you Conge! 

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I don't know particularly about NCA students, but I have worked in a small/mid Vancouver firm over the past 10 months and during that period they have hired two "random" short term hires who are neither lawyers nor paralegals, just individuals who are exploring the field. Based on this limited experience, I would say that yes, there must be at least a few firms out there who will hire people who do not fit a typical profile.

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15 hours ago, BeetleGirl said:

I don't know particularly about NCA students, but I have worked in a small/mid Vancouver firm over the past 10 months and during that period they have hired two "random" short term hires who are neither lawyers nor paralegals, just individuals who are exploring the field. Based on this limited experience, I would say that yes, there must be at least a few firms out there who will hire people who do not fit a typical profile.

Ah great, thanks a lot. Sounds like some good news! Would you happen to know the name of the firms that are hiring such people? (If you don't want to disclose it publicly you can message me too)

Thank you! :) 

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20 hours ago, tfox007 said:

Ah great, thanks a lot. Sounds like some good news! Would you happen to know the name of the firms that are hiring such people? (If you don't want to disclose it publicly you can message me too)

Thank you! :) 

Hi there. Sorry if you misunderstood, but I don't know what other firms do such hires. What I was suggesting is that since, in my personal experience, there is at least one firm that does "non-typical" hires, there may be more firms like that. 

I suggest you target firms that are small enough that partners directly participate in hiring and you can directly email the partner. In my firm, the partner hires directly, so has a lot of discretion. I know that in bigger firms, initial "screening" is done by staff or associates, and your application would likely never see the light of the day.

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I would apply to "legal assistant" positions. I know of small firms in greater Vancouver that hire NCA candidates for that type of work.

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On 7/31/2020 at 9:19 AM, BeetleGirl said:

Hi there. Sorry if you misunderstood, but I don't know what other firms do such hires. What I was suggesting is that since, in my personal experience, there is at least one firm that does "non-typical" hires, there may be more firms like that. 

I suggest you target firms that are small enough that partners directly participate in hiring and you can directly email the partner. In my firm, the partner hires directly, so has a lot of discretion. I know that in bigger firms, initial "screening" is done by staff or associates, and your application would likely never see the light of the day.

Oh I see

Thank you for the clarification, I will surely look for those kind of firms and email the partners in that case! :) 

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On 7/31/2020 at 7:53 PM, canuckfanatic said:

I would apply to "legal assistant" positions. I know of small firms in greater Vancouver that hire NCA candidates for that type of work.

Got it, I will explore that option now

Thank you! :) 

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