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dtor3

LSAT versus LSAT-Flex which do you prefer

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Will be taking LSAT shortly, and I was wondering whether to take the LSAT-Flex or whether to wait for the normal LSAT to be administered.

Do law schools prefer one over the other? (I understood that LSAT-Flex scores are reported with an asterisk).  

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It honestly depends on which sections you're better at. Flex only has one Logical Reasoning section compared to 2 on the regular lsat. If LR is a weakness of yours, flex would be better. If you're better at LR than games or reading comp, you should wait for the regular lsat if you can. Obviously, you should also consider whether you would perform better at your own home writing the test or in person at a testing centre. I don't think any Canadian law schools have said that they look at the 2 differently. 

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I dont think any schools will look at the two tests differently. I think it is important to recognize that waiting for a regular test to be administered (if that is what you prefer) will probably not happen for a few months, so if you're looking to apply this cycle, I wouldn't wait until the end of the year in hopes of avoiding the flex. You don't want to feel like you're studying or taking the test too last minute... especially if you have to take the test again! 

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Yes, you are right, probably there won't be a regular test this year. But I am worried a bit about the LSAT-Flex, is it the SAME test (SAME questions) administered over a number of days? How do they ensure fairness (i.e. students not communicating with each other etc.)?

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Can they ever be sure that students aren’t discussing content with others for the regular test?  I wrote the Flex yesterday.  The security checks were a little more than I anticipated, which I thought was a good thing.  I walked away feeling it was fair, but I don’t have anything to compare it to. 
 

 

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1 hour ago, Pastrey said:

Can they ever be sure that students aren’t discussing content with others for the regular test?  I wrote the Flex yesterday.  The security checks were a little more than I anticipated, which I thought was a good thing.  I walked away feeling it was fair, but I don’t have anything to compare it to. 
 

 

Isn't regular LSAT administered on the same date and at the same hour for everyone? That would prevent any content discussion, or am I missing something?

Are you a first time LSAT taker, how do you feel you did? :)

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I believe they normally write on same day, but I thought the tests were, or at least portions of them, reused until they are disclosed.  I just meant that any test that is reused has opportunity to be discussed. 

I was glad it was only two hours rather than three.  I’m worried about what my score will be, but I always worry after tests.  I found the thought of being watched on webcam as I wrote a little unnerving.  I’m used to seeing those who can see me, and reading body language and cues. Knowing someone could see me without my seeing them was a really weird feeling. It didn’t impact my test, but was the thing that bothered me most about the online platform.  I would have preferred to be in a room with someone walking around in that regard. 

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7 hours ago, Pastrey said:

I believe they normally write on same day, but I thought the tests were, or at least portions of them, reused until they are disclosed.  I just meant that any test that is reused has opportunity to be discussed. 

I was glad it was only two hours rather than three.  I’m worried about what my score will be, but I always worry after tests.  I found the thought of being watched on webcam as I wrote a little unnerving.  I’m used to seeing those who can see me, and reading body language and cues. Knowing someone could see me without my seeing them was a really weird feeling. It didn’t impact my test, but was the thing that bothered me most about the online platform.  I would have preferred to be in a room with someone walking around in that regard. 

I have a question for you: for the LSAT-Flex did you get to choose your timeslot or they assign it to you. Asking this because I am a better exam taker in the morning than in the afternoon.

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9 hours ago, dtor3 said:

I have a question for you: for the LSAT-Flex did you get to choose your timeslot or they assign it to you. Asking this because I am a better exam taker in the morning than in the afternoon.

I chose my time.  If you have a preference, log in as soon as you get the notice in your email that you can sign up for the date/time.  I waited a day or two and there were limited options left.  I wanted to write on Tuesday (options were Saturday, Sunday, or Tuesday).  All of the Sunday and Tuesday spaces were gone, and only a few times to choose from on Saturday.   They go quickly!

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On 7/12/2020 at 11:09 AM, dtor3 said:

Isn't regular LSAT administered on the same date and at the same hour for everyone? That would prevent any content discussion, or am I missing something?

Yes and no. 8:30 a.m. in Newfoundland is technically before 8:30 a.m. in BC. Even though they tell you not to discuss I bet it'd be possible, for instance, to find out online which section is experimental (for the regular in-person LSAT, where the experimental section exists) for those living in an Eastern province. But of course writing the same test on a different day is a whole different situation. 

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34 minutes ago, LawBlaw2019 said:

Yes and no. 8:30 a.m. in Newfoundland is technically before 8:30 a.m. in BC. Even though they tell you not to discuss I bet it'd be possible, for instance, to find out online which section is experimental (for the regular in-person LSAT, where the experimental section exists) for those living in an Eastern province. But of course writing the same test on a different day is a whole different situation. 

Hence they do not even bother with an experimental section (LSAT-Flex). 

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First time LSAT taker. I took the LSAT Flex twice in June + July. In the June exam I had issues connecting to with the proctor and I lost the connection multiple times during the RC section. The July exam went off without a hitch, and I feel I did quite well.

Overall I think the Flex format is great. It was so great to be able to write from home, at a time that I know I preform best. For those mentioning that the same test is being administered on different days, this is not what is happening with the flex. The test is constantly changing throughout the testing period. For example, the June Flex was a mix of two non-disclosed tests (Feb 2011 and Feb 2012), so there was 16 different test forms you could have had depending on the day/time you took the test. [1]

[1]: I am making this claim based on the powerscore podcast episode reviewing the June Flex. 

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Nice! I registered myself for the August administration, and even if they mentioned it is LSAT-Flex, I was forced to choose a testing center. Called support line, they told me that the registration for LSAT was still as if a normal test would be administered, and they will switch it later.

Not sure if everyone else encountered the same. When did you guys have the opportunity to choose your time?  Also, did you guy purchase Score Preview? If yes, when? 

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Those of you commenting about possible discussions of the test, please read this:
 

 

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52 minutes ago, dtor3 said:

Nice! I registered myself for the August administration, and even if they mentioned it is LSAT-Flex, I was forced to choose a testing center. Called support line, they told me that the registration for LSAT was still as if a normal test would be administered, and they will switch it later.

Not sure if everyone else encountered the same. When did you guys have the opportunity to choose your time?  Also, did you guy purchase Score Preview? If yes, when? 

About two weeks before I wrote.  I was originally signed up to write July 13th. I received the email that I could schedule a specific date/time on June 26th.   There were three different dates I could choose from, and multiple time slots for each.  Because I waited a day or two to actually schedule after I received the email, most of the options were gone.  So watch for the email and act quickly if you have a preference for when you write. :)

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1 minute ago, Pastrey said:

About two weeks before I wrote.  I was originally signed up to write July 13th. I received the email that I could schedule a specific date/time on June 26th.   There were three different dates I could choose from, and multiple time slots for each.  Because I waited a day or two to actually schedule after I received the email, most of the options were gone.  So watch for the email and act quickly if you have a preference for when you write. :)

Thanks! Will do! :)

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How long is your attention span? I personally enjoyed only having to do 3 sections in row and getting the whole thing over in ~2 hrs vs having to do an extra 2 sections after a 15 min break that stretched the process out to over 3.

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I've never taken the regular LSAT, so no comparison. But I just took the Flex, and while I really enjoyed only having to do three sections and completing the exam in only two hours, I've had technical difficulties literally every step of the way. (Except for the part where I registered to take it in the first place.)

EDIT: I should also say that I'm very likely one of the few people who's had this much trouble, and also, you'll be waiting awhile if you choose to postpone until after they're done with Flex. Even with my difficulties I wouldn't recommend waiting.

Edited by lh22

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