Jump to content
LegalQueen96

Did my good grades screw me out of getting a job in a firm?

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

Good grades absolutely do not bar you from receiving employment in private practice -- in fact, they do quite the opposite. I had straight A's in 1L and nearly every firm I applied to was interested in interviewing me. And this continued throughout the process (I even had several compliments about my grades during in-firms).

The only "negative" impact it had is on few smaller/mid-sized firms, which declined to interview me because my grades were very high and they didn't want to spend their resources pursuing me when they knew I would likely end up at a large firm.

Edited by georgecostanzajr
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Wait till @conge finds out people from BC say that Toronto is on the “east coast” pretty regularly. 

Gah!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, healthlaw said:

All of my friends from BC refer to Toronto as the “east coast” and for them it makes total sense 

I respectfully submit that we at least keep "east coast" reserved for the provinces in the east with a coast.

  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, conge said:

I respectfully submit that we at least keep "east coast" reserved for the provinces in the east with a coast.

But Ontario is east and has a coast.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, kurrika said:

But Ontario is east and has a coast.

James Bay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

James Bay

That's an interesting choice, considering the typical choices would be Lakes Erie and Ontario.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

That's an interesting choice, considering the typical choices would be Lakes Erie and Ontario.

Coast pretty much exclusively means the land next to the ocean. I’ve never heard anybody describe Toronto as being on the coast of Lake Ontario 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Coast pretty much exclusively means the land next to the ocean. I’ve never heard anybody describe Toronto as being on the coast of Lake Ontario 

Yes, for a non-ocean you'd use shore instead (though shore can also refer to a coast). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

Coast pretty much exclusively means the land next to the ocean. I’ve never heard anybody describe Toronto as being on the coast of Lake Ontario 

That may be your experience. It isn't mine!  I know lots of people who describe coastline re: their cottages on lakes, both Great and smaller, and on the bays in Ontario.  Having lived in ON all my life, maybe that's why it's more familiar to me. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, erinl2 said:

That may be your experience. It isn't mine!  I know lots of people who describe coastline re: their cottages on lakes, both Great and smaller, and on the bays in Ontario.  Having lived in ON all my life, maybe that's why it's more familiar to me. 

Yeah, that’s silly. If somebody told me Wisconsin was coastal I would assume they’re either ignorant of US geography or we need to rush them to the hospital immediately to get an MRI. And Wisconsin at least is on a Great Lake (or two? I can’t remember). If you tried to tell me that Des Moines, Iowa was on the coast because it’s beside Saylorville Lake, I don’t know what I would do. If your definition of coastal captures Des Moines, I respectfully submit your definition is useless

BCers reference to Toronto being on the East Coast has to do with Toronto’s place in the socio-political construct of the East Coast. The same way “East Coast” in the political context captures Washington, D.C. but not Savanagh, Georgia, despite the former being up the Potomac River and the latter being on the Atlantic. 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois
  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, conge said:

I respectfully submit that we at least keep "east coast" reserved for the provinces in the east with a coast.

No we call that The Maritimes, silly. 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

What do we call Newfoundland then?

The Maritimes. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You probably think I am joking. I am not. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Wait, do people from Ontario not consider Newfoundland part of the Maritimes? 🤯 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Noooooo. The maritimes is New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and PEI. Newfoundland + the three maritime provinces is Atlantic Canada. 

Somewhere in Atlantic Canada, my severely obese eighth grade social studies teacher is either turning in his grave or having another in a series of heart attacks at this blasphemy. 

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

Noooooo. The maritimes is New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and PEI. Newfoundland + the three maritime provinces is Atlantic Canada. 

Somewhere in Atlantic Canada, my severely obese eighth grade social studies teacher is either turning in his grave or having another in a series of heart attacks at this blasphemy. 

Wait till they hear that everyone in my eighth grade social studies class just drew  Nova Scotia and New Brunswick really messily so that we didn’t have to label them. To this day, I’m 50/50 to label them properly on a map. 

Real talk, though: I never learned the Maritimes was those three. If you’d asked me yesterday what the difference between the Maritimes and Atlantic Canada was, I would have guessed Atlantic Canada included the ocean-adjacent part of Quebec. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, realpseudonym said:

Noooooo. The maritimes is New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and PEI. Newfoundland + the three maritime provinces is Atlantic Canada. 

Somewhere in Atlantic Canada, my severely obese eighth grade social studies teacher is either turning in his grave or having another in a series of heart attacks at this blasphemy. 

@Hegdis This is what I was saying. I'd heard this. I have good friends from both the maritimes and Newfoundland, and they all unequivocally distinguish between the maritimes and Newfoundland.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • Aight welp, all I wanted to know what what type of stats id need to get in for uofC law as a 3rd yr, and I wasnt able to get any help from anyone who commented here. Luckily for me, someone who got into uofC law as a 3rd year pmed, and told me a 3.85+ and 165+ on the lsat is competitive enough to get into uofc law as a 3rd yr.... they actually got in with similar stats. So I will be applying to all ontario schools (whom accept 3rd yrs), as well as UBC, and UofA/UofC Law schools in 3rd yr.! I will not be responding to any more comments of anyone here, and im sorry if anything i said triggered arts majors (just stated what all my upper yr friends in STEM have told me) So good luck to the rest of you guys applying to law schools.... hope yall do well whether you are applying as a 4th, or 5th yr, or as a 3rd yr like me! Best of luck
    • cGPA 3.85, L2 is the same. Lsat 160 nov 2020. Top choices UofC/ U of A. I don’t have any ECs because I work 4 jobs. Should I rewrite?
    • You guys, the My Degree Was Harder Than Yours topic has been beaten to death.  Here. Undergraduate Programs: mine is harder than yours: The Great Debate - General Discussion - Lawstudents.ca
    • you can't compare an elective to a required course. That's another flaw.  Your sample size is also unrepresentative. It includes anecdotal evidence from friends of yours, and things you've heard from other student. You also may have skills conducive to succeeding in STEM courses and don't practice music or art, so yes they'll all seem easier.   These are all flaws that were present in your argument, that you would find in a typical logical reasoning question on the LSAT. Good luck with it!   
    • You need a higher LSAT. SNAILS is right (and isn't being rude or callous as far as I can see). If you want to get into law school, you need to bear down on that. A score in the 140s won't get you in anywhere in Canada. Take a look at our LSAT forum. Lots of good advice and suggestions there.

×
×
  • Create New...