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French program

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Hey, I am just wondering if anyone is considering doing the French program, or if current students who are taking it are enjoying it? I haven't used my French in three years (since high school), and I believe it would take me at least twice the amount of time to study for a French course than it would for an English course... Anyone have any thoughts on the program?

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Were you in an French immersion program in High School or prior? 

The e-mail was kind of confusing because at points it says that you either have to have a good grasp of the language now or should have had it at some time in the past, and at other points it says, it is ok if your French is garbo, we will teach you patiently.  

I took French as a second language up until High School. It is safe to say, even at my peak, I could only match the proficiency of a 9 year old native speaker. Even that is giving me too much credit, lol.  

If I was ever being considered for a Judgeship or a high ranking federal legal job (as they mention), I'd start considering on learning legal French then.

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Yes I was French immersion! So I am completely fluent and can hold conversations fine, but legal French is a whole other issue. I find it hard to read and write French quickly, so I feel like I would struggle with the exams. But it does make me feel better that there is at least someone else who is considering it that isn't perfectly bilingual.

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On 7/9/2020 at 1:36 AM, robobrain said:

Were you in an French immersion program in High School or prior? 

The e-mail was kind of confusing because at points it says that you either have to have a good grasp of the language now or should have had it at some time in the past, and at other points it says, it is ok if your French is garbo, we will teach you patiently.  

I took French as a second language up until High School. It is safe to say, even at my peak, I could only match the proficiency of a 9 year old native speaker. Even that is giving me too much credit, lol.  

If I was ever being considered for a Judgeship or a high ranking federal legal job (as they mention), I'd start considering on learning legal French then.

I'm hoping to take the program and I'd be in a similar boat to you, language-skills wise. Heckman introduced me to a 2L who is in the program and I'm just waiting on a reply to a bunch of questions I asked. They wouldn't advertise tutoring so strongly if everyone had to be completely fluent to enter the program. I have my language assessment at USB next week, we will see how it goes! I doubt if being "perfectly bilingual" as Manitoban writes is necessary, and clearly he/she will have a head start on at least a couple of us, not sure what he/she is concerned about. Legal anything is a whole other issue. 

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That was the point of this thread to figure out what other people's French levels are at, it makes me feel more comfortable that people are at or around my level. Because I know there are some people from Quebec in our year so that is a bit intimidating if they are taking the program😅

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I am also considering joining the french program, I did an exchange to Quebec in my last year of undergrad and took a course at USB but other than that I havent really practiced french all that much. 

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I'm wanting to take it as well. I was in French Immersion I think until grade 10 or 11, but haven't had an opportunity to speak the language for about 15 years. I felt better about it after doing the assessment with USB. A lot of us are in the same boat or have similar misgivings (comprehension, extreme effort, etc). I have to think that in an immersive environment we'll all get back to "cruising altitude" fairly quickly. The pass/fail aspect is comforting as well.

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Join the french courses! Makes you eminently more employable after your law degree is done and the courses themselves are not a crazy amount more difficult than the regular. The main thing is that assignments will be due in french in many instances. The other thing to keep in mind is that it is likely that some material will still be taught in English or at least clarified in case something isn't obvious. 

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