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lh22

Advice for improving logic games

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I'm taking the LSAT-Flex this July, so I understand that there's not going to be a whole lot of room for improvement between then and now. However, since this is the section that seems to make or break my practice test scores, I'm wondering if anyone has any further advice for how to improve my AR (in the event I want to retake the LSAT). 

Logic games is the section I've improved most on since I started studying last October, but it is still my worst section. I'm currently getting an average of about 15 correct questions, and based on how I usually score in the other sections this limits me to about a 164 overall score. Yet every so often on a practice test, I'll randomly get, like... only 8-10 logic games correct and it's pretty disheartening. My other sections have continued to slowly and steadily improve, but I feel like I've hit a wall with AR. I've used the PowerScore Bible for it, which has definitely helped. Although I still usually run out of time before I can go back and finish the harder questions, and if I work faster to get every question done, I get more wrong, so nothing changes with either method of attacking them. 

Right now, I'm mostly focusing on doing timed logic games sections. I'm particularly worried for the Flex because normally I have other LR and/or RC sections to bolster my score, so I don't know how this is going to pan out if I happen to get a difficult set of logic games this time around. 

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I used 7Sage's method and got one question wrong when I wrote. I found 7sage to be much, much more useful than the Bible's method. Actually, out of all the study methods I tried, I found 7sage to be by far the best. Better than Kaplan, Barron's, Mike Kim, etc. Unfortunately, 7sage's logic games explanations are no longer available for free on youtube. But if you want to shell out some money, you might find it to be worth it to you. 

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2 hours ago, lh22 said:

I'm taking the LSAT-Flex this July, so I understand that there's not going to be a whole lot of room for improvement between then and now. However, since this is the section that seems to make or break my practice test scores, I'm wondering if anyone has any further advice for how to improve my AR (in the event I want to retake the LSAT). 

Logic games is the section I've improved most on since I started studying last October, but it is still my worst section. I'm currently getting an average of about 15 correct questions, and based on how I usually score in the other sections this limits me to about a 164 overall score. Yet every so often on a practice test, I'll randomly get, like... only 8-10 logic games correct and it's pretty disheartening. My other sections have continued to slowly and steadily improve, but I feel like I've hit a wall with AR. I've used the PowerScore Bible for it, which has definitely helped. Although I still usually run out of time before I can go back and finish the harder questions, and if I work faster to get every question done, I get more wrong, so nothing changes with either method of attacking them. 

Right now, I'm mostly focusing on doing timed logic games sections. I'm particularly worried for the Flex because normally I have other LR and/or RC sections to bolster my score, so I don't know how this is going to pan out if I happen to get a difficult set of logic games this time around. 

Improving on the Logic Games really comes down to three things: first, find a diagramming method that works for you, two drill games, and three, drill more games.

Since you’re using PowerScore, I would be unsurprised if it was the diagramming that was the culprit. If you’ve already drilled a good amount and are stuck facing the same score, usually it’s the diagramming method that needs to be tweaked (assuming you have the ability to do better, which based on your score sounds like you do).

The PowerScore Bibles are what I self studied with, and they are certainly the legacy books of choice to recommend. However, their diagramming methods are rather dated and today other options exist, which IMHO, are far superior. As Ricky mentioned, 7Sage is good as is Manhattan LSAT. The Manhattan guides are typically what I recommend for those self studying.

At the very least, those two options will give you a window into new diagramming methods. The good news is that they are close enough that you don’t need to relearn everything. And the better news is that the few seemingly simple ways that they diverge from PowerScore can give you the extra time you need to get the score you want.

To give you some personal reassurance: I was a -10 or so on LG using PowerScore but as soon as I learned a new method (not either of those above but they are very similar. I actually took a course in Toronto with a different company) my score went to near perfect in only a couple weeks. The capacity was there but the method held me back.

Hope that helps!

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, RickyBubbles01 said:

I used 7Sage's method and got one question wrong when I wrote. I found 7sage to be much, much more useful than the Bible's method. Actually, out of all the study methods I tried, I found 7sage to be by far the best. Better than Kaplan, Barron's, Mike Kim, etc. Unfortunately, 7sage's logic games explanations are no longer available for free on youtube. But if you want to shell out some money, you might find it to be worth it to you. 

Thank you! I can't afford the course at the moment (and I don't think I have the time to go through it before the July LSAT either), but this is definitely something I'll consider for the future if/when I need to retake, much appreciated.

Edited by lh22

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15 minutes ago, AllanRC said:

Improving on the Logic Games really comes down to three things: first, find a diagramming method that works for you, two drill games, and three, drill more games.

Since you’re using PowerScore, I would be unsurprised if it was the diagramming that was the culprit. If you’ve already drilled a good amount and are stuck facing the same score, usually it’s the diagramming method that needs to be tweaked (assuming you have the ability to do better, which based on your score sounds like you do).

The PowerScore Bibles are what I self studied with, and they are certainly the legacy books of choice to recommend. However, their diagramming methods are rather dated and today other options exist, which IMHO, are far superior. As Ricky mentioned, 7Sage is good as is Manhattan LSAT. The Manhattan guides are typically what I recommend for those self studying.

At the very least, those two options will give you a window into new diagramming methods. The good news is that they are close enough that you don’t need to relearn everything. And the better news is that the few seemingly simple ways that they diverge from PowerScore can give you the extra time you need to get the score you want.

To give you some personal reassurance: I was a -10 or so on LG using PowerScore but as soon as I learned a new method (not either of those above but they are very similar. I actually took a course in Toronto with a different company) my score went to near perfect in only a couple weeks. The capacity was there but the method held me back.

Hope that helps!

This does help, thank you! I can't afford 7sage right now, but I'll keep it in mind for the future. I'll also take a look at Manhattan. Much appreciated.

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One way to test whether your diagramming is out of wack is to take some LG sections completely untimed. You should be able to get a LG section pretty much 100% correct without time constraint. If you're still getting around 15 correct, then it's likely you're not diagramming effectively. Remember, your diagram should visually represent all of the rules in a fool-proof way; you should never be referring back to the written rules on questions, because it's all on your diagram. 

 

Once you've got that sorted (and you do need to get it sorted), then you can focus on timed drilling. As at @AllanRCsaid, LG is about drilling, drilling, and more drilling. I get the feeling that a lot of the posters here who struggle with the section simply are not drilling enough games. There's also a right way and a wrong way to drill. The wrong way is to drill a game section, get 15 or so correct, review your answers immediately, and then never encounter that game again. LG is all about practice, and if you haven't completed an individual game with 100% accuracy under timed conditions, then you haven't mastered that game. What I'd recommend is make 3-4 copies of 20 or so of the most recent game sections, so 80 total games. First, you do the game under timed conditions stopping right at the 35 minute mark. Second, without correcting your answers, you revisit the game immediately with no time constraint. Maybe you couldn't figure out some questions or ran out of time on the last game--deal with those aspects here. Wait at least 24 hours (you can do more games in this period) before correcting the section and watching the associated 7sage video. Forget about the game for 3-4 days. Next comes the fun part. If you got even a single question wrong on any individual game, you MUST retake that game under timed conditions until you get it perfect, hence the 3-4 clean copies of each game. This method will feel tedious, and it is, but it also works. 

 

TLDR: to be a master game-taker, you need to do a lot of games, and do the same games again until you get them right. The LSAT and LG especially is a test that rewards hard work. Good luck!

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On 7/4/2020 at 5:41 AM, pierremenard said:

One way to test whether your diagramming is out of wack is to take some LG sections completely untimed. You should be able to get a LG section pretty much 100% correct without time constraint. If you're still getting around 15 correct, then it's likely you're not diagramming effectively. Remember, your diagram should visually represent all of the rules in a fool-proof way; you should never be referring back to the written rules on questions, because it's all on your diagram. 

 

Once you've got that sorted (and you do need to get it sorted), then you can focus on timed drilling. As at @AllanRCsaid, LG is about drilling, drilling, and more drilling. I get the feeling that a lot of the posters here who struggle with the section simply are not drilling enough games. There's also a right way and a wrong way to drill. The wrong way is to drill a game section, get 15 or so correct, review your answers immediately, and then never encounter that game again. LG is all about practice, and if you haven't completed an individual game with 100% accuracy under timed conditions, then you haven't mastered that game. What I'd recommend is make 3-4 copies of 20 or so of the most recent game sections, so 80 total games. First, you do the game under timed conditions stopping right at the 35 minute mark. Second, without correcting your answers, you revisit the game immediately with no time constraint. Maybe you couldn't figure out some questions or ran out of time on the last game--deal with those aspects here. Wait at least 24 hours (you can do more games in this period) before correcting the section and watching the associated 7sage video. Forget about the game for 3-4 days. Next comes the fun part. If you got even a single question wrong on any individual game, you MUST retake that game under timed conditions until you get it perfect, hence the 3-4 clean copies of each game. This method will feel tedious, and it is, but it also works. 

 

TLDR: to be a master game-taker, you need to do a lot of games, and do the same games again until you get them right. The LSAT and LG especially is a test that rewards hard work. Good luck!

Thank you! As you and other posters have mentioned, I think there is a problem with some of my diagramming as I've been paying more attention to it the last several days during practice. When I do review, I do the questions I got wrong again without time and without re-checking what the correct answer is. But this method still leaves me in the -6 range for that section, and seems to affect my performance in subsequent games very little. With some conscious effort I realized for certain setups/rules I don't make a compete diagram and I'm holding the rule(s) in my head because I genuinely have no idea how to represent it on paper, and it makes inferences take longer. 

At the very least, this week I can try to pin some of those down in hopes of even a couple point increase for the upcoming test. At 300 bucks a pop and 8-ish months of studying, I'm not keen to have to take it again if I don't have to.

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I wrote the LSAT December 2016 and scored a 158, with no prep session before it. I have since not gone back to the LSAT in any significant way till now, and provided that I don't get in this year, I am planning on writing for November. My main area of weakness is the games, where I can barely get through 1 complete game. In terms of the PowerScore Bible vs the Trainer, which one would you folks recommend for boosting my games score from essentially none correct?

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25 minutes ago, jvand93 said:

I wrote the LSAT December 2016 and scored a 158, with no prep session before it. I have since not gone back to the LSAT in any significant way till now, and provided that I don't get in this year, I am planning on writing for November. My main area of weakness is the games, where I can barely get through 1 complete game. In terms of the PowerScore Bible vs the Trainer, which one would you folks recommend for boosting my games score from essentially none correct?

It's been a while since I wrote the LSAT but IIRC, I found the Trainer to be marginally better than the Bible. I found 7sage to be much, much better than both of them though.

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3 hours ago, jvand93 said:

I wrote the LSAT December 2016 and scored a 158, with no prep session before it. I have since not gone back to the LSAT in any significant way till now, and provided that I don't get in this year, I am planning on writing for November. My main area of weakness is the games, where I can barely get through 1 complete game. In terms of the PowerScore Bible vs the Trainer, which one would you folks recommend for boosting my games score from essentially none correct?

Well, I'm the OP, so as you can see I'm still struggling with Logic Games lol, but my very first test (no prep) I got... 5 questions correct I think? Just practice alone, without any sort of instruction, improved my games, and as mentioned I then used the PowerScore Bible, which helped a little bit. But a lot of people here are recommending 7sage, so that's probably your (our) best option!

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