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pleaseadmitme97

Help please!! 3.38/3.85/ LSAT?

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Hi guys i was wondering if someone can give me some advice! So my cgpa is a 3.38, my L2 is approx 3.85, and my current LSAT score is a 149. So I know I need to work on  my LSAT score, I already signed up for the HarvardReady course with Yoni and I will be taking the October LSAT! I'm aware I need to score at least a 160+ to be considered competitive. However, should I try to improve my CGPA as well? Or should I simply focus on my LSAT? My transcript shows a steady improvement, and my L2 & B2 reflect that (both 3.85). In terms of my PS, I do believe it is quite strong, and my LOR are from professors who can speak to my academic abilities. I have a decent amount of extra curricular activities from my undergrad, and decent work experience not in the legal field but work experience nonetheless. Given all that, can someone give me solid advice please. Should I be looking for more extra curricular activities or can I just stick to my current full time job ? (I work in a daycare), and should I be talking about my current job in my PS at all?

 

Any advice would be appreciated! Thank you!

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forget about EC.

Make sure you score high on LSAT

What is your B2, B3 and L2. Which schools are you planning to apply?

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An extra semester of even straight As will do little to change your GPA, averages are fairly robust to changes like that. Plus if you don't get a higher LSAT it really won't matter.

Focus in getting a steller, your GPA is in an acceptable range for some lawschools, your LSAT is not. That's were you need to spend your energy.

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44 minutes ago, Luckycharm said:

forget about EC.

Make sure you score high on LSAT

What is your B2, B3 and L2. Which schools are you planning to apply?

My B2 & L2 are both 3.85. My B3 according to the OLSAS conversion is a 3.73. My top choices are ; Queens, uOttawa, Western, UNB & I’m looking into university of Alberta! But I will be applying broadly ( everywhere in Ontario except Osgoode & UFT for obvious reasons ) 

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Queens B2 , Western L2 and U of T B3. With a 165, you have a pretty good chance for Queens and Western. Ottawa is cGPA school.

 

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You need a strong LSAT. That will make or break you. Invest heavily in it.

I got into Queen's / Western / UofA / UVIC / Ryerson / Manitoba / Osgoode with a 3.30 / 3.84 / 165 albeit with strong ECs / work experience. And I started studying for the LSAT in July and wrote in September, so it's not like it's too late for you to prep for October :)   

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You should seek to improve your cgpa. You should also seek to improve your lsat. Without a stronger LSAT your application will struggle. These are obviously understood by you so I won’t labour the point. 
 

As for extra-circulars. You do not need legal related ones to stand out. In fact, having non-legal related ones may make you stand out more. I don’t get why people focus on legal related experiences so much. So many experiences are reflective of skills necessary for law. Sure working as a clerk may be great, but so too is volunteering with people with disabilities, working for a non-profit in recruitment and so much more. You’re not expected to go to law school with legal skills and knowledge. You’re expected to go with the ability to learn and balance competing tasks. What is most important with extra-curricular activities therefor in my opinion is how you explain the way it makes you a good applicant. This can be achieved through you explaining the role your work in day care impacts your desire to go to law school and how it demonstrates you’ll succeed. Focus on advocating for yourself and explaining how your work, extra circular activities and other matters make you a good candidate. 
 

Good luck! 

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26 minutes ago, Turtles said:

You need a strong LSAT. That will make or break you. Invest heavily in it.

I got into Queen's / Western / UofA / UVIC / Ryerson / Manitoba / Osgoode with a 3.30 / 3.84 / 165 albeit with strong ECs / work experience. And I started studying for the LSAT in July and wrote in September, so it's not like it's too late for you to prep for October :)   

That is amazing! And it really gives me hope for my application! Thank you so much! 

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Posted (edited)

I got into Queen's and Western with a 3.39 CGPA (even with a downward trend!, probably closer to 3.0 in the last year) and a 161/165 in 2017. Didn't apply to uOttawa so I can't speak for them. 

Like everyone else says, focus on the LSAT. And remember that you could always retake the LSAT later on (I think universities generally accept the February sitting results). If you can crack 160, you have a decent shot.

Also, I don't know if you've thought about it, but you could consider looking at LSAT tutors as opposed to prep courses. Tutors would likely focus their lessons on your areas needing improvement. Since LSAT questions often come in a few "categories", a tutor might help you identify ones with which you have more difficulty, which ultimately might help you get a few more questions right per section (which can drastically improve your score). Might be more pricey, though. That said, I paid a ton for an LSAT prep course years ago, and I didin't find it particularly helpful. Everyone is different!

Edited by SeniorLopez247
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1 hour ago, Luckycharm said:

Queens B2 , Western L2 and U of T B3. With a 165, you have a pretty good chance for Queens and Western. Ottawa is cGPA school.

 

They’d be a lock at Queens and Western with a 165 and that L2, their averages are 3.75/160 or something.

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Posted (edited)
24 minutes ago, SeniorLopez247 said:

I got into Queen's and Western with a 3.39 CGPA (even with a downward trend!, probably closer to 3.0 in the last year) and a 161/165 in 2017. Didn't apply to uOttawa so I can't speak for them. 

Like everyone else says, focus on the LSAT. And remember that you could always retake the LSAT later on (I think universities generally accept the February sitting results). If you can crack 160, you have a decent shot.

Also, I don't know if you've thought about it, but you could consider looking at LSAT tutors as opposed to prep courses. Tutors would likely focus their lessons on your areas needing improvement. Since LSAT questions often come in a few "categories", a tutor might help you identify ones with which you have more difficulty, which ultimately might help you get a few more questions right per section (which can drastically improve your score). Might be more pricey, though. That said, I paid a ton for an LSAT prep course years ago, and I didin't find it particularly helpful. Everyone is different!

I was planning on going for tutoring with HarvardReady, but someone advised to instead go for the course since I’ll get more hours for my money. Unfortunately, I already paid my fees for the course and can’t switch now. I have been self studying for a little over 6 months ( I took the January LSAT ).  I have heard a lot about Yoni from HarvardReady so I’m hoping this will do it for me. Sorry for the long reply! 

Edited by pleaseadmitme97

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2 hours ago, Luckycharm said:

Queens B2 , Western L2 and U of T B3. With a 165, you have a pretty good chance for Queens and Western. Ottawa is cGPA school.

 

@OP as long you get a 160+ you have a decent chance of admission with your stats. I think what @Luckycharm meant is that with L2 like yours a165 would make you a hard candidate to refuse. You should still try to do the very best you can on the LSAT, but don't feel as though if you fall short of a 165 that you have no shot at admission. 

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1 hour ago, pleaseadmitme97 said:

I was planning on going for tutoring with HarvardReady, but someone advised to instead go for the course since I’ll get more hours for my money. Unfortunately, I already paid my fees for the course and can’t switch now. I have been self studying for a little over 6 months ( I took the January LSAT ).  I have heard a lot about Yoni from HarvardReady so I’m hoping this will do it for me. Sorry for the long reply! 

Oh I’m not familiar with Harvard Ready. If you’ve heard goos things, then it might be a good program! I think I did Oxford seminars or something like that. The only way to know if it’s worth it is to do it!

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Posted (edited)
16 hours ago, Turtles said:

You need a strong LSAT. That will make or break you. Invest heavily in it.

I got into Queen's / Western / UofA / UVIC / Ryerson / Manitoba / Osgoode with a 3.30 / 3.84 / 165 albeit with strong ECs / work experience. And I started studying for the LSAT in July and wrote in September, so it's not like it's too late for you to prep for October :)   

That's great, congrats on your acceptances!! I currently finished my second year of uni and don't think I'll end my degree with the strongest cGPA (i.e. probably a 3.3 - 3.5 if I'm lucky & get good grades). So this gives me a lot of hope! If you don't mind me asking, what sort of ECs / work experience do you have? Are they law related like volunteering at a law firm or being part of a pre-law club? Or just general experience? Also (last question sorry), did you self-study or take a prep course for the LSAT?

Edited by aspiringlawyerr

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