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pzabbythesecond

How long is your commute, and how long is a "comfortable" walk?

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38 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

Yeah we were planning to go there for one of his first visits.

He’s old enough and enjoys them but he’s small so sometimes there’s too many big dogs. Last time we went to High Park he was the smallest dog and it also seemed like people were having a big dog convention. Dogs with paws the size of his head would try and come play.

Assuming it cools down I might try and go tonight.

The park at the Beaches has a small dog area, though it’s always empty whenever I walk by. That’s the only waterfront park with a small dog area I can think of, though. And obviously a bit further from you than Cherry Beach. 

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Coronation park has a doggie area. I think there’s one in the park right next to the Humber as well. 

Edited by Jaggers

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Management told us to take the afternoon off, so I went for a bike ride along the waterfront. Cherry Beach was packed. The DJ was even there!

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can this somehow be made into a "Toronto neighbourhoods" type thread. It would be very helpful for those of us who will be moving to the city but haven't yet lived there...

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2 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

Cherry Beach was packed tonight.

What was the average age? I’m sure that will determine the amount of hand-wringing...

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17 minutes ago, easttowest said:

What was the average age? I’m sure that will determine the amount of hand-wringing...

Seemed to be a mix of all ages to be honest. I wasn’t paying a ton of attention to the people and I kept my distance. Lots of space in the off leash dog area.

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It was mostly families with kids when I went through mid-afternoon, except around the DJ booth, which was mostly 20 somethings. Also a lot of kite surfers (or whatever you call it) of all ages. So I would say minimal hand-wringing.

Edited by Jaggers

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There was a claim above somewhere in this thread that downtown Toronto is the epicentre of Ontario's covid outbreak. That was not true - downtown Toronto is very safe! But here's a good article about where the outbreak actually affected many people.

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/06/28/torontos-covid-19-divide-the-citys-northwest-corner-has-been-failed-by-the-system.html

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19 minutes ago, Jaggers said:

There was a claim above somewhere in this thread that downtown Toronto is the epicentre of Ontario's covid outbreak. That was not true - downtown Toronto is very safe! But here's a good article about where the outbreak actually affected many people.

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/06/28/torontos-covid-19-divide-the-citys-northwest-corner-has-been-failed-by-the-system.html

The Star is paywalling their COVID coverage again? That’s unfortunate 

Edited by BlockedQuebecois
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