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What types of Summer Jobs do 1Ls usually have?

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I am wondering what types of jobs 1L's typically have in the summer? is there any websites I can look at to get an idea of what is offered for Law Students?

I'd also be open to doing volunteer and not paid work! 

 

Thank you

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In BC 1L students do literally anything/everything.

A lot of 1Ls volunteer for LSLAP (Law Students' Legal Advice Program) which is a clinic run by UBC but open to volunteers from any Canadian law school. It gives students practical experience from drafting memos to attending small claims hearings with the supervising lawyers.

I worked for my city's tourism board. A lot of people worked as servers in restaurants. My SO went back to her retail job for the summer. Some people with connections did office work at law firms. Some people took the summer to travel.

You can do literally whatever you want during your 1L summer.

The one thing you shouldn't do in your 1L summer is nothing. Don't sit around at home playing video games all summer. Do something that you can talk about in an interview. Whether it's traveling, working retail, volunteering, etc. just occupy that time somehow.

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Posted (edited)

A small minority of students get a job at a law firm, whether through the formal recruit or through connections. Some small firms also sometimes let students shadow lawyers or work as assistants. A large portion of students get an RA position with a prof, or work at a clinic that is affiliated with/run by the university. Some get a fellowship to work with an organization (usually through the university).

Some get a non-legal job, working in retail, at the gym, etc. Some take the summer off to travel. Basically, anything! As long as you don’t sit around doing nothing!

I don’t know if you’re a 1L or if you’re asking for next year but if you’re currently a 1L, RA positions might still be available if you reach out to your profs. Typical non-legal jobs might be harder to find due to the current situation but you might still be able to find something if you look online (maybe even the student jobs posted by the government if you qualify). 

If you want to volunteer, any kind of volunteering is great! There’s also a new online service (Forgot the name) that matches law students with law firms for short term projects. You might want to look into it!

Edited by andi28

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I volunteered as a backpacker where I explored various sights around Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia and got plenty wasted. 11/10 would recommend.

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I bartended at a golf course. Practiced and played every morning, worked at night. Lovely.

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Posted (edited)

If Covid hadn't bungled my plans I was going to work in food service for the summer (it's what I did before law school). I've been told by multiple people that customer service skills are essential for law, so food service, cashier jobs etc are perfect if you don't want/can't get something law-related.

Until/unless I find other employment for this summer I'm just keeping busy at home with a bunch of random projects.

Edited by RGoodfellow

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1L law-related jobs are quite difficult to get. There are very few firm jobs and some miscellaneous law jobs. Government agencies sometimes hire 1L's too (I was supposed to work at one this summer but it got cancelled due to Covid). Research assistant jobs are also available. Your grades, research experience, relationship with the professor, and interest in the subject are important factors in getting an RA position.

I've heard it's also fine to get non-law jobs or volunteer. I would take the opportunity in the summer to do something different and learn a new skill/get new experiences that are transferable to a legal job.

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38 minutes ago, RGoodfellow said:

If Covid hadn't bungled my plans I was going to work in food service for the summer (it's what I did before law school). I've been told by multiple people that customer service skills are essential for law, so food service, cashier jobs etc are perfect if you don't want/can't get something law-related.

Until/unless I find other employment for this summer I'm just keeping busy at home with a bunch of random projects.

Yeah. In one of my big law interviews I was asked about an old undergrad job I had at a restaurant. They liked my answer about liking the feeling of serving customers well and focusing on details to provide the best experience, and how I've used those lessons in my legal jobs since too.

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29 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Yeah. In one of my big law interviews I was asked about an old undergrad job I had at a restaurant. They liked my answer about liking the feeling of serving customers well and focusing on details to provide the best experience, and how I've used those lessons in my legal jobs since too.

Also, more often than not, the applicant with service expertise, such as a waitress or bartender, can actually have a normal conversation with strangers (interviewers).

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2 minutes ago, FingersCr0ssed said:

Also, more often than not, the applicant with service expertise, such as a waitress or bartender, can actually have a normal conversation with strangers (interviewers).

Sure. But to judge people who never broke into the restaurant industry (which can be notoriously difficult to do if you're male without connections) as potentially not being as social would be a step too far.

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3 minutes ago, FingersCr0ssed said:

Also, more often than not, the applicant with service expertise, such as a waitress or bartender, can actually have a normal conversation with strangers (interviewers).

Yeah man, can't do it otherwise. In non-service jobs communication skills are non-existent, and they immediately give you your position.

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4 hours ago, RGoodfellow said:

If Covid hadn't bungled my plans I was going to work in food service for the summer (it's what I did before law school). I've been told by multiple people that customer service skills are essential for law, so food service, cashier jobs etc are perfect if you don't want/can't get something law-related.

Until/unless I find other employment for this summer I'm just keeping busy at home with a bunch of random projects.

Anecdotally, I had heard that numerous places, and my years of customer service experience both in food service and outside of it didn't help at all. I can't say for sure, but I think it may have hurt me in my search. 

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3 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Sure. But to judge people who never broke into the restaurant industry (which can be notoriously difficult to do if you're male without connections) as potentially not being as social would be a step too far.

 

3 hours ago, lolnope said:

Yeah man, can't do it otherwise. In non-service jobs communication skills are non-existent, and they immediately give you your position.

Where did I state the inverse holds true? I never said those who haven't worked in service don't have social skills. Presumably, OP is wondering what looks good on a resume as a 1L. A quick cognitive shortcut is service industry = possibility for social skills. Hiring committees have told me such point blank. Applications aren't analyzed based upon what's not there. Why would I comment on those who haven't worked in an industry when that won't be on an application because it wasn't a lived experience? Solid rebuttal against a non-existent argument.

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I have classmates doing all sorts of things. In terms of legal work, I know people working: on Bay St, at a small firm, Crown's Office or Courthouse, Research Assistantships, and various fellowships. Many others are doing what most students would do over the summer break. That is, working in whatever industry/field they can get hired in. There are a lot who are even just hanging out and working on themselves. There is absolutely no pressure to get a legal job in your summer after first-year.

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I worked at a federal law enforcement agency. The jobs that 1Ls get are so varied that it's not even worth really comparing. Just do what you want to do.

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Check out the PBSC pages of the school that is closest to you (doesn’t even have to be your school). Maybe you can do some volunteering with them, even if you’re not close, you can still possibly do remote work. 

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I split my time as an intern for a solo practitioner who did the external legal work for an investment bank, and with the in-house counsel for that investment bank. My key qualification was working 60-hours a week for free. If you are willing to do that, you should be able to find a law-related 1L job without much issue, if you actively look for one a few months in advance. 

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6 minutes ago, adVenture said:

I split my time as an intern for a solo practitioner who did the external legal work for an investment bank, and with the in-house counsel for that investment bank. My key qualification was working 60-hours a week for free. If you are willing to do that, you should be able to find a law-related 1L job without much issue, if you actively look for one a few months in advance. 

Man, that's abusive. That's the one type of employer (sole practitioner or not) that can afford to pay their student.

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17 minutes ago, adVenture said:

I split my time as an intern for a solo practitioner who did the external legal work for an investment bank, and with the in-house counsel for that investment bank. My key qualification was working 60-hours a week for free. If you are willing to do that, you should be able to find a law-related 1L job without much issue, if you actively look for one a few months in advance. 

I have to say that that is unusual for a couple of reasons. What investment bank is using a sole practitioner for external counsel? (And I ask that not expecting you to actually answer). And what investment bank would be okay with this arrangement of not paying you for this work? (Again, not needing an answer but yeah this is a very unusual (and wrong) situation).

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