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potentiallawstudent1

Lsat studying where do I start?

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I just finished my second year in undergrad and I plan to take the lsat sometime next summer or in the beginning of 4th year. I like to be proactive and start studying for tests far in advance as i usually perform much better with lots of preparation. I was just wondering what is the best way to start studying since I have good amount of time before I plan on taking the lsat and what resources/ tips are useful at the beginning on the lsat studying process.   

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It really depends on how you learn best. I took an LSAT course because I do best in a classroom environment and I was working full-time at the time, so I liked having a schedule to force me to stay on top of my studying and I had some extra money that I could spend on a course. That worked for me, I got into law school. Other people have self-studied to great success. I waited for my course to start before I did any studying because I didn't want to take myself down some wrong path by trying to work on my own and misunderstanding something. I was probably just worrying too much though and there wasn't a big risk of that really happening.

The very first thing I would do is decide what general method you're going to use - in person courses aren't available now (I'm sure), but you could do an online course, online tutoring, or self-study. Look into the options, think about what's worked best for you in the past.

Also come up with some sort of schedule. Besides my course, I did two or three timed sections every weeknight and one or two full timed test each day of the weekend. I'd normally take one night off each week to avoid burning out. Some other schedule might work better for you, so think of what makes the most sense and stick with it. (I also studied much less than a year, so you might not need to work every single day).

I'd also recommend cold writing a diagnostic. I think it's useful to have a basic sense of what comes instinctively to you when it comes to the LSAT. It's also nice at the end to see how much you've improved. Your diagnostic score is not likely to be particularly good, but the LSAT is a learnable test and I've never heard of someone not improving on their first score.

Finally I'd also say a year is way more time than I'd spend studying for the LSAT (I studied about 3-4 months), but you know yourself as a test taker best. Just make sure not to burn yourself out - some people talk about there being diminishing returns when you study the LSAT for too long.

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