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sang2020

Are law students that horrible to each other?

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I've heard horror stories from law students regarding their peers. 

For example, a U of T law student told me that their fellow peers would sometimes rip pages of a library book that contains the answer to prevent others from studying and getting a question right. 

I've also heard of people ruining each other's computers etc.

 

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There’s more people who talk about people ripping pages out of books than there are people who rip pages out of books. I can’t verify whether anyone has actually ever ripped pages out of books but I will say that it’s probably law school legend. In any event, the legend of the book rippers are hearsay at best and as such unreliable. 
 

Law students are a mixed bag, with most of them being nice and helpful. Some are intense and don’t much care to help others but themselves. In my experience however, most are helpful, kind and good people! 

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2 minutes ago, sang2020 said:

For example, a U of T law student told me that their fellow peers would sometimes rip pages of a library book that contains the answer to prevent others from studying and getting a question right. 

This is an urban myth at every law school. It might have happened at some point, but it's evolved into something else entirely.

My experience in law school was one in which everyone was willing to share their notes with each other and help their peers understand the material. Most law schools have a database of exam notes that students voluntarily upload (for access by that school's students only).

What gets drilled into your head is that the legal community is small and you're bound to encounter your classmates out in the real world after graduation. You might work with them. You might work for them. You might be on opposite sides of a trial. Be kind to each other because everyone will remember if you're not.

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I found my classmates to be very supportive. There were a few incidents in which certain students engaged in ideologically motivated character assassination of other students but that never bled into the academic side of law school.

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4 minutes ago, msk2012 said:

I found my classmates to be very supportive. There were a few incidents in which certain students engaged in ideologically motivated character assassination of other students but that never bled into the academic side of law school.

"few incidents in which certain students engaged in ideologically motivated character assassination of other students"

What do you mean by this? please clarify... 

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Law students for the most part are very supportive of each other. We have to be, it's a demanding subject to learn and to have a career in. The old adage of "treat others like you wish to be treated yourself" rings particularly true, our lives are stressful enough as is without personal conflict and drama getting in the way. I just finished 1L and aside from one unfortunate incident of dishonesty I've been very happy with the people I've met, the friends I've made, and the support I've received. 

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44 minutes ago, sang2020 said:

"few incidents in which certain students engaged in ideologically motivated character assassination of other students"

What do you mean by this? please clarify... 

Will send a PM.

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In this electronic age what possible good would ripping out a physical library book page do? Let’s think about that.
 

Clearly an urban myth that people repeat without actually thinking critically. 

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At my school, all your "answers" would come from the textbooks you bought and the lectures you went to. No professor has ever expected us (and in fact, all have explicitly told us not) to get answers from library books that weren't the already assigned course textbook. Most other resources are available digitally anyways. 

Law students are generally very kind and supportive of one another, but there are always a few ultra competitive students that can rub you the wrong way (but in my experience, they are the minority). Pandemic actually revealed a lot about individual personalities and which students were self-serving compared to those who genuinely wanted to lend a helping hand to their peers.  

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2 hours ago, sang2020 said:

For example, a U of T law student told me that their fellow peers would sometimes rip pages of a library book that contains the answer to prevent others from studying and getting a question right. 

This story has been around since I went to law school over 10 years ago.

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1 hour ago, msk2012 said:

Will send a PM.

Also curious, especially since we went to the same school (I know, not at the same time, but still).

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, msk2012 said:

Will send a PM.

I'm also curious

Edited by Aschenbach

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Posted (edited)

I just finished 1L at Osgoode.

You’ll have a good deal of “kumbaya” classmates with a real “we’re all in this together” vibe. Many students were hesitant, or outright refused, to discuss grading/marks/exams with classmates. Many refused to even acknowledge the underlying competition related to securing a 1L summer firm position.
 

Fortunately, the veil was lifted rather abruptly this year with the pandemic (mandatory/optional pass/fail debate). All of the sudden grades and career opportunities became the forefront of discussion. Those who refused to acknowledge competition from September-March were forced to acknowledge it.

I did not experience or engage in any active sabotage efforts, as I was able to achieve competitive marks by reading all the cases and throwing together some good summaries in late November/early December.  I only know of one student who dropped out (in October) because the competition was too intense.

 

Edited by student0033

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3 minutes ago, sang2020 said:

I should prob note that this was from 2 LSAT teachers.

What was?

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Just now, Hegdis said:

What was?

The stories about ripping the book and ruining computers.

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Oh! Well.... hopefully this thread has reassured you somewhat. 

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I don't think this is something that is unique to law, if it ever did happen.

My academic supervisor told me that while she was completing her post-doc at UofT, she knew of someone that actively sabotaged another student's cell cultures by secretly dosing their media with alcohol or something.

Not saying its only UofT, but higher levels of education probably attract determined people that may resort to unfavourable ways to get ahead of their peers.

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14 hours ago, sang2020 said:

 For example, a U of T law student told me that their fellow peers would sometimes rip pages of a library book that contains the answer to prevent others from studying and getting a question right. 

They do something much worse: they unload their emotional baggage on you. 

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