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lawlawhopeful123

Canterbury College - questions!

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Hi, 

I'm trying to find housing for the upcoming school year. I was wondering if Canterbury College is considered "on-campus" or "off-campus" housing? I've seen it being referred to as both, and am a bit confused. Also - if it is on-campus, is the meal plan mandatory? I've heard some not-so-great things about the UWindsor meal plan, and would like to stay away from it if possible.

Also - if anyone has lived in Canterbury College before, any insight on how the place is would be appreciated. Or if anyone has any insight on apartments near the university (doesn't have to be Canterbury), as I am looking for a bachelor or 1-bedroom, please do share! Thank you!

:)  

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Hey, 

I'm an incoming 1L and I'm booked to stay in the new Canterbury Brownstones this September. From what I heard the residence is affiliated with Windsor but intended for "mature students" (ie. not students in undergrad). It wasn't expected that I buy a meal plan (thank god because I heard that its gross as well). Some older students have told me the downside is the rooms are kinda small. 

On another note I wouldn't "sign" anything yet because we are still waiting to hear if first semester will be completely online or only partially online. So far the administration has said it will be *primarily* online. Whether it is online or not may very well determine if you move to Windsor or not. Would advise you wait a second before booking anything. 

Best, 

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It's "on campus" in the sense that it is literally across the street from the law building. It's "off-campus" because it's located in its own area outside of the rectangle of buildings that makes up the campus. There is no mandatory meal plan. The new building was very nice to live in, the older buildings not so much, based on what I have seen and heard - but they are slightly cheaper and still in a good location.

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