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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ppzz said:

Am i the only one start to question myself instead of work hard on lsat, it seems work experience or master have bigger influence. On the accept thread, i found some people with similar cgpa, much lower lsat get accepted or both lower with work experience or master degree. So I am start to regret as gap a year to study lsat, it is better just to work or get an master degree. 

Let me rephrase, Am I the only one who starts to question oneself instead of work hard on LSAT, it seems work experience or master has accounted for a larger proportion of the admission decision. On the accept thread, I found some people with a similar GPA, much lower LSAT or statistic both lower but with work experience or master's degree get accepted. So I am starting to regret my decision as gap one year to study LSAT, it seems to get work experience or get a master's degree increase chances more than high LSAT. 

Edited by ppzz

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1 hour ago, ppzz said:

Let me rephrase, Am I the only one who starts to question oneself instead of work hard on LSAT, it seems work experience or master has accounted for a larger proportion of the admission decision. On the accept thread, I found some people with a similar GPA, much lower LSAT or statistic both lower but with work experience or master's degree get accepted. So I am starting to regret my decision as gap one year to study LSAT, it seems to get work experience or get a master's degree increase chances more than high LSAT. 

I appreciate your post, however, unless your concerns specifically pertain to the waitlist, I don't think this is the thread to be having this type of discussion.

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oh sorry, cause I have been put on wait-listed on May 11th. I am concern about the promotion opportunity after go through the accepted thread. Post this just try to found out the reason why I get on wait-listed rather than accepted offer. 

17 minutes ago, junooakley said:

I appreciate your post, however, unless your concerns specifically pertain to the waitlist, I don't think this is the thread to be having this type of discussion.

 

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4 hours ago, ppzz said:

Let me rephrase, Am I the only one who starts to question oneself instead of work hard on LSAT, it seems work experience or master has accounted for a larger proportion of the admission decision. On the accept thread, I found some people with a similar GPA, much lower LSAT or statistic both lower but with work experience or master's degree get accepted. So I am starting to regret my decision as gap one year to study LSAT, it seems to get work experience or get a master's degree increase chances more than high LSAT. 

As others mentioned, perhaps it’s your English writing ability. Additionally, as you note, lsat and cGPA are not the only factors contributing to being admitted. Look over your essays, could they be stronger? How are your ecs/work experience/volunteering? Did your references provide you with strong letters? Once you reach a threshold of having a relatively strong lsat and GPA you know that’s not what’s holding you back , it’s the other factors that likely determine whether or not you’re admitted. 

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2 hours ago, ppzz said:

oh sorry, cause I have been put on wait-listed on May 11th. I am concern about the promotion opportunity after go through the accepted thread. Post this just try to found out the reason why I get on wait-listed rather than accepted offer. 

 

No one here can tell you why you were waitlisted. Everyone's application is unique. Would a master's degree and work experience help? Probably. But so would a higher GPA and LSAT, along with a well-written personal statement and compelling autobiographical sketch. Trying to pinpoint specific reasons as to why you were waitlisted is impossible.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Pls said:

As others mentioned, perhaps it’s your English writing ability. Additionally, as you note, lsat and cGPA are not the only factors contributing to being admitted. Look over your essays, could they be stronger? How are your ecs/work experience/volunteering? Did your references provide you with strong letters? Once you reach a threshold of having a relatively strong lsat and GPA you know that’s not what’s holding you back , it’s the other factors that likely determine whether or not you’re admitted. 

Thanks for this. That is what I am thinking about, cause generally, every school has a different preference. I adjust my application profile toward each school. I found out Osgoode is more concerned about the experience rather than academic achievement,So if I do another year, I might shift the focus of my application profile or maybe update an internship or work experience with them recently instead of keep listing academic record. 

Edited by ppzz

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, ppzz said:

Let me rephrase, Am I the only one who starts to question oneself instead of work hard on LSAT, it seems work experience or master has accounted for a larger proportion of the admission decision. On the accept thread, I found some people with a similar GPA, much lower LSAT or statistic both lower but with work experience or master's degree get accepted. So I am starting to regret my decision as gap one year to study LSAT, it seems to get work experience or get a master's degree increase chances more than high LSAT. 

As per Osgoode's stated admissions process, when your stats are under the presume admit threshold, they review your application holistically. Holistic review means they consider your GPA and LSAT, as well as your work experience or graduate degrees or other accomplishments. As part of that, they review your letters of reference, the outline of your work experience and extracurriculars, and your personal statement(s). I don't know what background you have, nor do I know how well your personal statements were written, what they included, or how the admissions committee perceived them (whether they perceived you positively, e.g. articulate, or negatively, e.g. arrogant, etc). As a rule of thumb, I'd probably agree that meaningful work experience that develops you as a person or as a professional and that gives you something to write about is more valuable than studying an entire year for the LSAT (which is a long time), and the added value of a higher LSAT score diminishes the higher you go. In my case, I stopped studying for the LSAT at one point because the unique experience I could get working was a better use of my time than a mind-blowing score (at least for the purposes of Canadian admissions).

That said, everyone has a different path, and some get there faster and others slower. We all have different strengths and weaknesses, privileges and handicaps, and starting positions in life. Don't feel like you failed because you weren't admitted yet and don't blame the admissions committee that your application didn't stand above the competition. Some people need two admissions cycles to make it, some three, and for some it can take much, much longer. Law schools will still exist next year or in five years. You can improve your application by getting solid professional experience, rewriting your personal statement(s), pursuing graduate studies, finding better references to write your reference letters (e.g. from your future graduate studies or work experience), etc. You have the opportunity at the end of the summer to request feedback on your application from Osgoode which may help you reflect on what worked and what didn't. In 30 years, after a long and prosperous career, whether you started law school in 2020, 2021, or 2025 will really not matter. As long as you spend your time productively, learning, investing into yourself, and forging strong relationships with friends/family/a partner, the time is not wasted. In many ways, it may be a blessing to let you take on something else until the COVID-19 situation improves or to introduce you to an opportunity you would have otherwise missed.

Good luck OP.    

Edited by Turtles
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2 minutes ago, Turtles said:

As per Osgoode's stated admissions process, when your stats are under the presume admit threshold, they review your application holistically. Holistic review means they consider your GPA and LSAT, as well as your work experience or graduate degrees or other accomplishments. As part of that, they review your letters of reference, the outline of your work experience and extracurriculars, and your personal statement(s). I don't know what background you have, nor do I know how well your personal statements were written, what they included, or how the admissions committee perceived them (whether they perceived you positively, e.g. articulate, or negatively, e.g. arrogant, etc). As a rule of thumb, I'd probably agree that meaningful work experience that develops you as a person or professional and that gives you something to write about is more valuable than studying an entire year for the LSAT (which is a long time), and the added value of a higher LSAT score diminishes the higher you go. In my case, I stopped studying for the LSAT at one point because the unique experience I could get working was a better use of my time than a mind-blowing score (at least for the purposes of Canadian admissions).

That said, everyone has a different path, and some get there faster and others slower. We all have different strengths and weaknesses, privileges and handicaps, and starting positions in life. Don't feel like you failed because you weren't admitted yet and don't blame the admissions committee that your application didn't stand above the competition. Some people need two admissions cycles to make it, some three, and for some it can take much, much longer. Law schools will still exist next year or in five years. You can improve your application by getting solid professional experience, rewriting your personal statement(s), pursuing graduate studies, finding better references to write your reference letters (e.g. from your future graduate studies or work experience), etc. You have the opportunity at the end of the summer to request feedback on your application from Osgoode which may help you reflect on what worked and what didn't. In 30 years, after a long and prosperous career, whether you started law school in 2020, 2021, or 2025 will really not matter. As long as you spend your time productively, learning, investing into yourself, and forging strong relationships with friends/family/a partner, the time is not wasted. In many ways, it may be a blessing to let you take on something else until the COVID-19 situation improves or to introduce you to an opportunity you would have otherwise missed.

Good luck OP.    

Thanks, that's a relief. I am just trying to found our way to improve my chances next time. You are right my opportunity cost of LSAT is too high. 

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Posted (edited)

I am sorry to start this argument, I hope I could end it here. As go through accepted thread, I think one has been promoted, cause I found the same people post on accepted and wait-listed. Maybe there are more but just based on the form, it seems like one so far. 

Edited by ppzz

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People, these threads are for posting waitlist details, just like the Accepted and Rejected threads. Several posts have been deleted. If you want to have a discussion about other aspects of being on a waitlist, please start a new thread.  And please keep it free of the personal attacks. Thanks.

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Waitlisted June 9th

OLSAS cGPA: 2.64

B2: 3.44

LSAT: 167

Filled out Part B.

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Just now, leafyleak said:

Anyone else staying on the waitlist past tomorrow ? 

As of now I have no offers. The one positive in this is being able to stay on Osgoode's waitlist!

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20 minutes ago, leafyleak said:

Anyone else staying on the waitlist past tomorrow ? 

You are going to turn down Western and Queen's to stay on the Osgoode waitlist? 

Don't. There are people who are still on the Osgoode waitlist from years ago. You may never hear back. Western and Queen's are great schools to attend. 

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38 minutes ago, leafyleak said:

Anyone else staying on the waitlist past tomorrow ? 

Which school did you accept provisionally, Queen's or Western?  That is the offer that will go firm. I agree with Deadpool that it would be foolish to give up an opportunity to attend either of those schools and gamble on getting off the Osgoode waitlist, which is unlikely.

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I applied as an international student from the states, I’ve accepted a school in nyc  and will attend osgoode if accepted. I did my undergrad at McGill, - but Queens as an International student is 60,000 Canadian, and western is 45,000. Osgoode is much more reasonable as an international applicant at 35k. 

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3 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

Which school did you accept provisionally, Queen's or Western?  That is the offer that will go firm. I agree with Deadpool that it would be foolish to give up an opportunity to attend either of those schools and gamble on getting off the Osgoode waitlist, which is unlikely.

I initially provisionally accepted Queens but withdrew my acceptance before the deposit deadline. Will be attending Law school in New York as of now, but staying on the Osgoode waitlist. 

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25 minutes ago, leafyleak said:

I initially provisionally accepted Queens but withdrew my acceptance before the deposit deadline. Will be attending Law school in New York as of now, but staying on the Osgoode waitlist. 

Fordham?

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