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On 7/30/2020 at 6:08 PM, lawstud1111 said:

That sounds so exciting I actually can't wait to get involved

yeah, i will caution though, as a previous poster did, that you might not get all or any of what you want/expect. the clinic spots (which again, from what i’ve heard through the grapevine, largely won’t be available to 1Ls this year?) were pretty limited and/or competitive. some things (e.g. some of the PBSC placements) just suck and you don’t figure it out until after you’ve committed. some people strike out and don’t get anything at all — absolutely not reflective of them as a law student, it’s just the luck of the draw. 

i think a lot of folks (read: me) got stressed about ECs in september because it’s the first few weeks and you’re just really eager to jump in and do cool law school things. so i want to emphasize that you reeeaaally shouldn’t feel bad or anxious if you get dealt a bad hand. it’s not important. you have a whole three years, with opportunities popping up at several points throughout those years. 

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7 hours ago, garlicbread said:

yeah, i will caution though, as a previous poster did, that you might not get all or any of what you want/expect. the clinic spots (which again, from what i’ve heard through the grapevine, largely won’t be available to 1Ls this year?) were pretty limited and/or competitive. some things (e.g. some of the PBSC placements) just suck and you don’t figure it out until after you’ve committed. some people strike out and don’t get anything at all — absolutely not reflective of them as a law student, it’s just the luck of the draw. 

i think a lot of folks (read: me) got stressed about ECs in september because it’s the first few weeks and you’re just really eager to jump in and do cool law school things. so i want to emphasize that you reeeaaally shouldn’t feel bad or anxious if you get dealt a bad hand. it’s not important. you have a whole three years, with opportunities popping up at several points throughout those years. 

Seconding this. Some of the placements sound SO COOL and then when you begin them you realize they’re less hands on than you hoped and some don’t have too much guidance. I did not like my clinic then had to spend 2 hours a week there anyway. I think it’s worth talking to upper years that have done clinics you’re applying for if they were available in past years. After orientation the admins of the 2023 group will open it up to upper years and you’ll be able to join the upper year groups as well so you could post to see if anyone has done it.

Even if you don’t find something you like or don’t get the ECs you like, a lot of things also pop up over the course of the year that people who are swamped with ECs already don’t have the capacity for. It’s gonna be okay.

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