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Jared99

What Can I do with a UK LLB in Canada when being a lawyer is not possible.

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I don't think the NCA's position is that distance education doesn't count, just that distance learning in the absence of in-person learning doesn't count.

The policy is laid out as the following:

Quote

The National Requirement specifies that two-thirds (or two out of three years) of an Applicant’s law degree must have been obtained through in-person instruction in an Approved Law School or Qualifying Law Degree program. The Executive Director will take all evidence submitted into consideration to determine whether the in-person requirement has been satisfied.

An Applicant who holds a law degree that does not meet this requirement (i.e., distance education) must successfully complete two (2) years in a law program acceptable to the NCA, in addition to any other requirements identified by the Executive Director. However, the two-year requirement may be reduced if an Applicant has received some in-person instruction in an Approved Law School or Qualifying Law Degree program.

Depending on how long the COVID situation goes on, there may be a legitimate concern but I imagine that there would be consideration given to the circumstances.

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The NCA is guarding against degree mills. There are some legit online universities but they are massively outnumbered. 

If distance learning at a reputable university that would offer offline courses if there weren’t a pandemic becomes an exception to these rules, that would still be entirely consistent with the public interest. 

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You can apply for a job as a Court Clerk for either your provincial or Federal government. I do not know what the requirements are in other provinces, but to get a job as a Court Clerk in BC you only need a high school diploma (other jobs of this type may ask for other qualifications, but the one I applied to didn't). I'm sure your foreign degree would not hinder you in this regard, but don't quote me on it (I don't see why it would considering it isn't a legal assistant or lawyer occupation).

While your credentials have paved a difficult road for you to take, I would not lose hope. There are people with foreign degrees who have made it work for them. Perhaps consider getting a Canadian college-level certificate to pair with it for some added leverage.

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26 minutes ago, RelaxingTimes said:

While your credentials have paved a difficult road for you to take, I would not lose hope. There are people with foreign degrees who have made it work for them. Perhaps consider getting a Canadian college-level certificate to pair with it for some added leverage.

For what? To qualify for a legal assistant job? If it's not a paralegal program, I don't see the benefit.

Edited by Trew
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24 minutes ago, Trew said:

For what? To qualify for a legal assistant job? If it's not a paralegal program, I don't see the benefit.

It depends on what OP is looking for. I'm under the assumption that he is uninterested in pursuing a Canadian undergraduate/graduate-level education at this point, so a certificate in his choice of study may be a viable option, provided that additional education of some sort is even on the table. Otherwise, I wish OP the best of luck and hope something eventually comes along.

Edited by RelaxingTimes

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6 hours ago, Jared99 said:

So JD courses that are being taught online because of COVID-19 shouldn't count. Just to be fair. 

Canadian JDs don't need to go through the NCA process so...

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21 hours ago, Jared99 said:

So JD courses that are being taught online because of COVID-19 shouldn't count. Just to be fair. 

Ah, the F-word. I hate that word. It's a meaningless word. Fair doesn't exist in the abstract. If it did, children wouldn't get cancer. Fair exists only in specific contexts, and then it is the product of specific values, tests, and criteria. Invoking "fairness" without specifying what you think those values, tests, and criteria should be is just an attempt to avoid confronting what you are really saying, and to assume that the values you are bringing to your idea of what "fair" should look like are inherently universal values, when they are anything but.

So, here's what I think you are saying. You are saying that every law degree from any school that chooses to offer something and call it a law degree should be treated equally. And you are saying that every student who attends any such school, however shady, ill-reputable, or half-assed, should be treated like every other student who attended any other law school. And that's your idea of what fair should look like. And that idea proceeds, I suppose, from the idea that the NCA and the various Law Societies exist to give everyone a chance if they want a chance to practice law. And all of those assumptions and beliefs are simply wrong.

Schools are not all equal. Law Societies (and the NCA process) doesn't exist to give you a chance to practice law if you want one. They exist to make sure you do not practice law unless you're competent to do so. And if you imagine it's somehow "unfair" that you get to the end of this process and found you cannot be licensed as a lawyer, I'd like you to consider this. This isn't new information. You had access to this information prior to starting whatever degree you've completed, and it isn't like you aren't an adult when you started. So do I think that the public should be protected from people wanting to practice law who can't even figure out what's required in order to practice law? Fuck yes. How in the world do you imagine you are competent to solve other people's legal problems when you can't even be bothered understanding what's going on in your own life?

If you want to call things "fair" or "unfair" based on whether or not you get what you want, then go ahead. But the world doesn't owe you an equal share of what you want just because you want it. Legal practice exists to help real clients. And until you realize this process isn't designed to help you become a lawyer, it's designed to stop you from becoming a lawyer (and, in all probability, fucking up others peoples lives in the process) unless and until you qualify properly, none of this is going to make sense to you.

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21 hours ago, msk2012 said:

I don't think the NCA's position is that distance education doesn't count, just that distance learning in the absence of in-person learning doesn't count.

The policy is laid out as the following:

Depending on how long the COVID situation goes on, there may be a legitimate concern but I imagine that there would be consideration given to the circumstances.

Hey guys sorry to intrude but I have a question regarding this. 

 

I might start a 2 year LLB program in the fall in the UK, this program is traditionally taught in person however due to COVID the first semester might be partly or completely online. Does anyone know the NCA stance on this? 

Will i still be able to be accredited? I was thinking of doing an LLM in Canada to fulfill the requirements.

I emailed the NCA but I haven't received reply yet.

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39 minutes ago, RJar said:

Hey guys sorry to intrude but I have a question regarding this. 

 

I might start a 2 year LLB program in the fall in the UK, this program is traditionally taught in person however due to COVID the first semester might be partly or completely online. Does anyone know the NCA stance on this? 

Will i still be able to be accredited? I was thinking of doing an LLM in Canada to fulfill the requirements.

I emailed the NCA but I haven't received reply yet.

No idea. Best to wait and see what the NCA says.

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On 5/21/2020 at 8:58 PM, BlockedQuebecois said:

No. Hence why I said distance degrees are not eligible for the NCA exams. 

I don’t think this is true. I am quoted to do 7 NCA exams in Canada once I finish my LL.B from the UK. One of the requirements is a 2:2 average at the minimum as well. Some UK students are doing the 3 year LL.B program and they have to do 5 exams instead of 7. 

I made sure I did all this research before going abroad. The NCAs and CLFAs gave me this consistent info. Here, I am getting different info. 

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22 minutes ago, CrimNation said:

I don’t think this is true. I am quoted to do 7 NCA exams in Canada once I finish my LL.B from the UK. One of the requirements is a 2:2 average at the minimum as well. Some UK students are doing the 3 year LL.B program and they have to do 5 exams instead of 7. 

I made sure I did all this research before going abroad. The NCAs and CLFAs gave me this consistent info. Here, I am getting different info. 

https://nca.legal/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/PolicyManual2020.pdf

Quote

7. Mode of Study

7.1 In-class Learning Requirement

The National Requirement specifies that two-thirds (or two out of three years) of an Applicant’s law degree must have been obtained through in-person instruction in an Approved Law School or Qualifying Law Degree program. The Executive Director will take all evidence submitted into consideration to determine whether the in-person requirement has been satisfied.

An Applicant who holds a law degree that does not meet this requirement (i.e., distance education) must successfully complete two (2) years in a law program acceptable to the NCA, in addition to any other requirements identified by the Executive Director. However, the two year requirement may be reduced if an Applicant has received some in-person instruction in an Approved Law School or Qualifying Law Degree program.

The NCA will not accept courses taken in Contracts, Torts and Property if they were completed through distance education. If an Applicant is not able to complete all assigned NCA subjects through in-person instruction, they may be satisfied through the NCA exams.

7.1.1 Exception

Completion of Additional Legal Studies in an Approved Law School or Qualifying Law Degree program will count towards the in-class requirement. The Executive Director will also review any Core Subjects successfully completed in the common law as part of those studies. If the Core Subjects were not completed in class, they will be assigned along with any Additional Legal Subjects (if applicable).

 

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At the risk of station the obvious, distance degrees/distance education are not the same as studying abroad.

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