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mhrads

Applying in third year, weight of summer courses

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Posted (edited)

Hi y'all, 

I am a 2nd year Carleton student who is dead set on going to law school.  My question is: will good law school such as UBC, McGill, or UAlberta view me as a less desirable applicant if I apply in third year, as opposed to fourth?  I will also taking 2 summer courses and was wondering if they are weighed the same as regular fall/winter term ones.

What are my chances of being accepted in my 3rd year based on these grades from each year? (3.75/3.84/3.78, 165 LSAT) 

 I understand a completed degree would be better if I decide law school is not for me, but I can not take an extra year of living in Ottawa.  I also have the option to switch my honours BA to a general BA if I am accepted.

 

Cheers

 

Edited by mhrads

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Hey! It seems that all schools recommend a 4 year degree, and while open to a 3rd year entry, it is rare to get accepted barring exceptionality. Think about it - that's an extra year of proving one's ability to handle the stress of school and succeeding, and typically in 'higher' level courses. While your stats definitely seem competitive for admission to a lot of schools, I'm not sure they'd be considered exceptional by those schools you mentioned as they're comparable to the stats of people entering with 4 years. If you really can't handle Ottawa, maybe look into a transfer rather than losing your honours? Just my opinion though. Good luck 🙂

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On 4/25/2020 at 9:20 PM, mhrads said:

Hi y'all, 

I am a 2nd year Carleton student who is dead set on going to law school.  My question is: will good law school such as UBC, McGill, or UAlberta view me as a less desirable applicant if I apply in third year, as opposed to fourth?  I will also taking 2 summer courses and was wondering if they are weighed the same as regular fall/winter term ones.

What are my chances of being accepted in my 3rd year based on these grades from each year? (3.75/3.84/3.78, 165 LSAT) 

 I understand a completed degree would be better if I decide law school is not for me, but I can not take an extra year of living in Ottawa.  I also have the option to switch my honours BA to a general BA if I am accepted.

 

Cheers

 

How would you have a third year of grades if your application is submitted before you’re done even half the year?

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Hey there,

I just applied this cycle in my third year of undergrad. I was actually at uOttawa, and wanted to move onto Law School like you. My cGPA for my first 2 years was a 3.82 and the LSAT I applied with was a 160. I got into both Queens and Western, and accepted Western. So I have no doubt with your LSAT score, you should be a shoe-in for multiple schools. Good luck on your application process!

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On 4/25/2020 at 7:20 PM, mhrads said:

Hi y'all, 

I am a 2nd year Carleton student who is dead set on going to law school.  My question is: will good law school such as UBC, McGill, or UAlberta view me as a less desirable applicant if I apply in third year, as opposed to fourth?  I will also taking 2 summer courses and was wondering if they are weighed the same as regular fall/winter term ones.

What are my chances of being accepted in my 3rd year based on these grades from each year? (3.75/3.84/3.78, 165 LSAT) 

 I understand a completed degree would be better if I decide law school is not for me, but I can not take an extra year of living in Ottawa.  I also have the option to switch my honours BA to a general BA if I am accepted.

 

Cheers

 

My husband got in with just 3 years completed as well. With similar stats at both the two universities he applied too, Ucalgary and UofA. 

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Posted (edited)

 I applied and was accepted this year in my third year of undergrad (BBA)

I'm leaving undergrad with 96 credits with my first year J.D. credits being transferred over and used to complete my undergraduate degree. To do this I had to complete all core degree requirements by the end of my third year. I had to take a full course load last summer while studying for the LSAT, working and volunteering. I was accepted to both maritime schools with a 3.9 and 157 LSAT, I submitted four reference letters, two academic, one personal, and one professional. 

 

I highly recommend that nobody ever attempt to do this if you value your sanity. You may save a year of school, but you probably lose a few years of your life from the stress and sleep deprivation... lol 

 

Edited by Hshebs
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1 hour ago, Hshebs said:

I highly recommend that nobody ever attempt to do this if you value your sanity. You may save a year of school, but you probably lose a few years of your life from the stress and sleep deprivation... lol 

While it's probably not the path for everyone, I wouldn't go so far as to recommend that nobody apply in third year.  I worked throughout undergrad as well, didn't stress, didn't lose sleep, and still got accepted without a problem to one of the schools OP is aiming for (UBC).  As long as you plan far enough ahead and are 100% committed to going to law school, I don't see a problem in applying early.    

If OP is still reading this thread, UBC doesn't care if you don't finish undergrad.  Keep in mind that they don't look at L2/B2/B3 like other schools do and just look at cGPA.  If your 165 is an actual score, take a look at our accepted threads to see roughly what GPA you'll need.  

 

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, meandtheboys said:

As long as you plan far enough ahead and are 100% committed to going to law school, I don't see a problem in applying early.

I have just completed my first year of law school after entering out of third year. Of course, it is a perfectly good path for some, but it comes with a number of disadvantages if you are not a mature student. I would not recommend rushing into a rigorous professional program for the reasons OP has mentioned (not liking Ottawa). It seems as if a transfer to another school to complete their undergrad would better serve OP's purposes than upping the ante and jumping into a J.D./L.L.B. program. Make no mistake, I am confident OP will achieve admission to a "good" law school (read: a Canadian law school) if they keep their grades up in third year; I just think it is important to explore why OP wishes to attend and why OP cannot stand Ottawa. 

Even if OP is "dead set" on attending law school, they will be sacrificing a critical year of professional and academic development, and, as mentioned, may be at a disadvantage without an undergrad degree if they determine law school was not the right choice. This means OP may still be at a disadvantage when it comes to maturity, life experience, etc. 

OP, please give this a lot of thought, and understand that law school will require a greater level of effort than your undergrad before you make this decision. 

On 4/25/2020 at 9:20 PM, mhrads said:

I can not take an extra year of living in Ottawa.

I think it is also important to consider why you cannot fathom another year in Ottawa. Are you not challenged in your undergrad? Do you not have a support system (i.e. friends and family)? Do you associate Ottawa with the stress of school? Do you not like your peers? 

Consider whether the reason you cannot stand Ottawa will present itself again in the city or town your law school will be located. Doing well in a professional program will be much more difficult if this environmental stressor follows you out of Ottawa.

Another important question to ask is whether you have connections (i.e. social support) in the cities where you desire to attend law school (Edmonton, Vancouver, or Montreal). 

PM me if you want more insight into my situation; I would be happy to provide more detail and advice. Best of luck.

On 4/25/2020 at 9:20 PM, mhrads said:

I will also taking 2 summer courses and was wondering if they are weighed the same as regular fall/winter term ones.

McGill: from their website, it does not seem as though McGill has a preference for Fall/Winter/Summer courses. They provide instruction on their view of P/F or S/U grades for Winter and Summer 2020 courses in light of COVID-19; so it seems they consider both. It should be noted the McGill expresses a strong preference for applicants who have completed their undergraduate degree prior to entry (in my experience, this typically means an honours degree). Maybe someone here with more experience from McGill can give you more insight as to what is required of a successful candidate without a degree. 

Alberta: their admissions policy expresses a preference for courses completed during "full-time" study, which may result in less consideration being given to summer courses. 

UBC: their website does not denote "full-time" study, and, if @meandtheboys is right and UBC does just look at cGPA, then I would presume summer courses would just be factored into this.

Edited by KidAyy
Clarification

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@meandtheboysI meant to emphasize how difficult it may be not that it shouldn’t be done. I found it challenging because I had to complete degree requirements and requirements for a major in Finance in three years. It may be much more manageable if OP is in a less structured program. 
 

@KidAyy OP still may be able to obtain on undergraduate degree so long as they complete at least one year of Law school. Many schools allow students to transfer JD credits to complete an undergraduate degree. 

 

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Mcgill won't accept you with an incomplete degree - you need to be finishing your undergrad prior to the anticipated start date, unless you are accepted through the CEGEP category (which won't happen if you didn't go to CEGEP).

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