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Rosetah1

Moncton's reputation outside NB

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Has anyone on here graduated from Moncton's Ecole de droit and found employment out of province? If so, could you please share your experience? Was the school's career development office of much help?

 

 

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There are a couple of Moncton grads in my jurisdiction. They had local connections (from here). One says they were still asked about it (why NB when Ottawa offers a French common law program) with some employers, and others didn't care. No one bothers them now that they have been working.

Employers know that Moncton has lower entrance stats and does not require the LSAT. Depending on where you are applying, they may not have even heard of it (does Western Canada know that Moncton has a law school?). YMMV. In the end, it's a Canadian law school, teaches you Canadian law and I know of highly competent lawyers that have graduated from there.

The Career development office is likely trying to help place students where their mandate is - serving altantic canada's French population and especially within New Brunswick (and I guess with the Halifax recruit?). I am not too sure if they are helping students with the Toronto recruit if that is what you wanted to do. FWIW, one of my colleagues who graduated from Moncton ended up in Toronto for a spell but all through his own networking.

Do some searches via LinkedIn and see where Moncton grads end up. Try to see if there are any in the area that you hope to eventually enter.

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Posted (edited)

Excellent feedback. Going by past threads on here it appears that they also have a very strict marking system compared to some better known schools which may make them a less attractive option. Having said that their tuition is very low (8k) v UNB's (12k) or even Ottawa's (20k). Which jurisdiction are you in?

Edited by Rosetah1

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