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Iceteahi

Access Category: Concussion, ADD/ Asperger's?

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1 minute ago, Rashabon said:

I agree with CleanHands initial post. Unless your LSAT score suffers as a result of your diagnosed condition(s) in which case you might have the grounds for an access claim, I see no benefit in applying as an access candidate. If your stats remain perfectly acceptable in the regular stream, you should apply as a regular applicant. Access isn't a "this is where the atypical people go" stream - it's to provide access to those who, as a result of circumstances beyond their control, were unable to obtain competitive stats and need a more compassionate and nuanced view of their application package.

With respect to your personal statements, I think it is a matter of personal choice and how integral these are to your day-to-day life and whether you want to talk about them. That's a lot more subjective than the decision to apply regular or access.

Thank you! This has been all really helpful. I honestly did view it as "this is where the atypical people go." For most academic instances dealing with my documented disability, it isn't necessary to prove if it actually impairs you, but simply that you have a disability that could impair you. I see now that I'd likely only have to discuss my concussion to explain the B-grade and the part-time course load.

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16 minutes ago, Iceteahi said:

I took summer school courses to catch up

I recommend that you peruse the admissions criteria and forum discussions for each school you’re interested in. You will get a better idea of which schools will/not factor in part-time/summer classes and how it may affect your overall application file.

For example, UofA calculates your last 60 credits starting from the bottom of your transcript and working their way up, regardless of how you got them. USask takes your B2 full-time years of study. I don’t think you’d need to address the concussion for these schools.

On the other hand, schools with holistic processes could raise an eyebrow on the part-time and summer classes, so you might consider addressing it in those applications.

But more importantly, go nail that LSAT! Your amazing GPA paired with a solid LSAT will open many doors.

Good luck

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1 minute ago, Iceteahi said:

Thank you! This has been all really helpful. I honestly did view it as "this is where the atypical people go." For most academic instances dealing with my documented disability, it isn't necessary to prove if it actually impairs you, but simply that you have a disability that could impair you. I see now that I'd likely only have to discuss my concussion to explain the B-grade and the part-time course load.

A single B-grade and "part-time" coursework (3 courses was considered "full-time" at my academic institution and for tax purposes in my province when I was in undergrad, btw--might want to check that) don't require explanation.

I also think there may be some conflation of accommodations and an access application here--those are two distinct things. Accommodations are measures taken at the school to accommodate you in light of your disability once you are accepted, while an access claim is an explanation to admissions to ask for some leeway in your application to the program. You should seek accommodations, you should not apply access (unless your conditions adversely affect your LSAT performance). You would need to provide some evidence that your conditions adversely affected your performance if applying access, while this would not be a requirement to receive accommodations

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7 minutes ago, Iceteahi said:

Thank you! This has been all really helpful. I honestly did view it as "this is where the atypical people go." For most academic instances dealing with my documented disability, it isn't necessary to prove if it actually impairs you, but simply that you have a disability that could impair you. I see now that I'd likely only have to discuss my concussion to explain the B-grade and the part-time course load.

I'm no admissions expert, but I wouldn't really try and explain away a single B-grade. One B is not bad at all and will not make or break your application in any way. It's not worth highlighting it. Part-time course load though may be worth explaining, which can be done in a personal statement or supplemental part of the application, but again, I wouldn't stress it too much. It was temporary and you appear to have not suffered long-term effects and it didn't materially affect your grades.

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Fellow autistic/Aspie and AD(H)D woman here! I don't have an additional input on whether you should be applying in one category or another. Personally, though, I did apply as an access applicant where the option was available because my grades were without a doubt negatively affected by my disabilities (3.2 cGPA). I don't actually recall which schools required documentation, but for my personal statements, I went into detail about my symptoms and how they negatively impacted my university experience without ever disclosing my specific diagnoses. Instead of using the word "autism," for example, that might look like describing the regular, painful sensory overload I struggled with during lectures that prevented me from following along. This approach seems to have been adequate for them, since I've now been admitted to three schools I applied to.

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