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kurrika

Policy - Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations [Victoria BC]

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https://bcpublicservice.hua.hrsmart.com/hr/ats/Posting/view/68793

 

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Combine your client service, stakeholder engagement and strategic planning skills in this challenging role

The Ministry of Finance plays a key role in establishing, implementing and reviewing government’s economic, fiscal and taxation policies. The Policy and Legislation Division provides policy analysis and advice to the Minister of Finance, Cabinet, the Deputy Minister of Finance, and other senior government officials. The Division is responsible for tax policy, financial and corporate sector policy, real estate policy, and intergovernmental fiscal relations. The Division directs the implementation of related government decisions through development and preparation of legislation.

Intergovernmental Fiscal Relations (IFR) provides analysis and advice to the Minister of Finance and Premier in regards to federal-provincial fiscal relations, including federal-provincial fiscal arrangements (such as the Canada Health Transfer, the Canada Social Transfer, and Equalization) and priority areas of joint federal/provincial social policy (such as income security and pension income adequacy). IFR also provides analysis and advice to the Minister of Finance and Premier in regards to local government finance, including provincial funding to local governments for operating and capital projects. IFR's analysis and advice supports ongoing consultations and negotiations in respect of federal-provincial fiscal arrangements, as well as ongoing review and redesign of local government finance.  

 

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*waggles eyebrows*  Fiscal Relations, say no more, say no more....

 

Not quite as good as Canada's department of Ashley Madison Global Affairs

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how is life in bc compared to ontario? ive never been to victoria. what is life like there? how is the public transit? can i go hiking every weekend? can i live comfortably without a car? 

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23 hours ago, levin said:

how is life in bc compared to ontario? ive never been to victoria. what is life like there? how is the public transit? can i go hiking every weekend? can i live comfortably without a car? 

Ontario is a dustbag province compared to BC.

 

Public transit in Victoria is excellent. The office this job is located in is easily accessible from every major transit route and dedicated unwashed traffic rule breaking hippy bike lane.  Life in Victoria is excellent (other than the housing prices).  You can go hiking every weekend.  You can live very comfortably without a car (you may not be able to afford a car with the housing prices).

 

 

Edited by kurrika

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If you are looking for a city with half the population and four times the median age of Kingston, Victoria is the place for you!

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BC is pretty good. Had I got in to UBC or UVic I probably would have just stayed because of inertia.

But I'm so happy I broke away and am back in Toronto. Nothing out west compares.

Edited by easttowest

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On 4/15/2020 at 11:45 AM, levin said:

how is life in bc compared to ontario? ive never been to victoria. what is life like there? how is the public transit? can i go hiking every weekend? can i live comfortably without a car? 

If you like being able to get everywhere by bike or bus, easy access to wilderness, and the occasional wearing of tank tops outdoors in January, Victoria's unbeatable. The consequence of this is that you can stick a zero on the end of your cost of living expectations.

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Vancouver Island is amazing. I'd never want to live there, but it's absolutely a must visit spot.

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36 minutes ago, easttowest said:

BC is pretty good. Had I got in to UBC or UVic I probably would have just stayed because of inertia.

But I'm so happy I broke away and am back in Toronto. Nothing out west compares.

In which senses do you say Toronto has BC beat? I'm genuinely curious to hear from someone who's lived in both places.

I've only asked one person like you before, and they said the nightlife and people willing to go out at night is just incomparable. 

Anything else in particular in mind?

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40 minutes ago, kurrika said:

Ontario is a dustbag province compared to BC.

 

Public transit in Victoria is excellent. The office this job is located in is easily accessible from every major transit route and dedicated unwashed traffic rule breaking hippy bike lane.  Life in Victoria is excellent (other than the housing prices).  You can go hiking every weekend.  You can live very comfortably without a car (you may not be able to afford a car with the housing prices).

 

 

Last year when I was travelling out west for the first time (Alberta, not B.C., but specifically to the Rockies so I think this story is relevant) my wife and I struck up a conversation with another passenger on our flight.  He was from Calgary heading back from his first time visiting Toronto.  We asked him about what to expect about Calgary/Banff/Lake Louise/Jasper (we did all that in like 7 days), and he gushed about all the normal stuff you would think (the beauty, the outdoor activities, etc).  He really talked it up.  We then asked him what he thought of Toronto since it was his first time, and he marveled at the number of highways there are in the GTA.  That was his only comment.  If I remember correctly I think he mentioned going to Niagara Falls, but only in the context of the highways you can take to get there.  

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9 minutes ago, pzabbythesecond said:

In which senses do you say Toronto has BC beat? I'm genuinely curious to hear from someone who's lived in both places.

I've only asked one person like you before, and they said the nightlife and people willing to go out at night is just incomparable. 

Anything else in particular in mind?

Culture and energy. They aren't kidding when they say it's more laid-back out west. It is, and I'm far too tightly wound to really lean into it.

Don't get me wrong, Vancouver is a beautiful city. You can't beat the summers unless the fires were bad and smoke wipes out all of August. If you're an outdoors nut, it's basically perfect; you're a short trip to anything you could want to do in the mountains or on the ocean. 

I enjoy the outdoors but don't seek it out, so I need my city to do more for me. Toronto's theatre, ballet, art, museum, opera, sports... likely you could pick a culture thing and Vancouver can't compare. I don't know about bar scene because I was part of Vancouver's so know it intimately and it's quite good and I haven't had a chance to figure Toronto's out yet... but I'd imagine it's true for that too.

If I want to get outdoors, I can do that on my annual two-week trip to Vancouver in August.

 

And I'll stop derailing the thread now.

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23 minutes ago, easttowest said:

Culture and energy. They aren't kidding when they say it's more laid-back out west. It is, and I'm far too tightly wound to really lean into it.

I agree with this. I was sent to work in Vancouver for a few months in a previous job, and there was very little to do other than hiking, biking, beaching, etc. But that was 15+ years ago now, so I'd love to go back and see how things have changed. Toronto is certainly a completely different city.

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4 minutes ago, Jaggers said:

I agree with this. I was sent to work in Vancouver for a few months in a previous job, and there was very little to do other than hiking, biking, beaching, etc. But that was 15+ years ago now, so I'd love to go back and see how things have changed. Toronto is certainly a completely different city.

 

I don't do any cultural stuff, I don't go to sports games, I'm not into the bar scene, I never went clubbing etc... - I assume Toronto has Vancouver beat, and Victoria doubly beat.   So if that is important to you....

Edited by kurrika

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Am reading about cherry blossoms while watching it snow out the window in Toronto.

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Cherry blossom season is beautiful. I used to live in Kits and I would love walking down to the beach along roads lined with blooming cherry blossoms. I'm very happy I got to spend five years in Van. 

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