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navyblue11

LSAT Flex

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So I just got an email that the LSATs are now being administered as LSAT-Flex. Basically, you do the same LSAT but from home and proctors watch you through the camera and mic. Both a human and a computer will review the footage afterwards to ensure the integrity of the test-taker. There will (apparently) be no breaks between sections unless they are part of your accommodations, and this option will be administered for those who were registered for the now-cancelled April LSAT and possibly beyond, depending on COVID-19 developments. 

Personally, I'm not sure what to think. I think there are pros and cons to this, in that you can take it in a lower-stress environment (your own home), but there's more likely to be distractions there. And of course, I'm definitely not a fan of the no-breaks development. Of course, there are more arguments to both sides. I was just wondering what everyone thinks about this - do you think this could signal something good or bad for the applicants of this year? 

 

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No breaks between sections is pretty insane. Even 6-hour take home exams I get up to take a shit and have a coffee. You probably can't do either for 35 x 6

Edited by Trew
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29 minutes ago, Trew said:

No breaks between sections is pretty insane. Even 6-hour take home exams I get up to take a shit and have a coffee. You probably can't do either for 35 x 6

I've heard that they're only giving out three sections (one of each category) instead of five with the Flex, so hopefully that'll help. But I'm the same in that I need breaks every now and then to clear my head, even if it means going to the washroom in an in-person exam. 

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But will the people who take it at home still get the annoying kind message from the President of LSAC before the test? Or the free pen/stylus for that matter?!

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I can only speculate that LSAT-flex will be just as difficult (possibly more) as the regular LSAT, notwithstanding the fact that it is only three sections.

Obviously the test-makers will have to restructure it in such a way to test your mental acuity and reasoning skills in three sections rather than five (ie. More higher difficulty questions in each section than usual). 

Edited by Zongo

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I think I am going to sign up for fun and see what happens. I was scoring high 160's but test anxiety got to me. only got a 157. I already got accepted in a few schools, but not the best, if I end up getting 160+, I might have to take a gap year and apply next year 

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19 minutes ago, jatthopefullawyer said:

this is unfair. I would have loved to do 3 sections instead of 5. you also get to do it at home, which helps with stress. so unfair. that is life I guess 

I wouldn't say it's unfair because everyone is dealing with the same conditions 

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16 minutes ago, Zongo said:

I can only speculate that LSAT-flex will be just as difficult (possibly more) as the regular LSAT, notwithstanding the fact that it is only three sections.

Obviously the test-makers will have to restructure it in such a way to test your mental acuity and reasoning skills in three sections rather than five (ie. More higher difficulty questions in each section than usual). 

I don't think they'll do that, simply because then there's a lot more complexity for schools in comparing scores against each other. For instance, they'd have to track down who took the Flex and who didn't, and then would have to make a judgement call as to how they'd weigh that in their admissions process. If they choose to make the LSAT portion more lenient for the Flex people because of its increased difficulty level, then that's an unfair disadvantage for those who may have taken the regular test later in the cycle (assuming the COVID-19 crisis clears up by then), as applicants might be passed over simply because others with the same score took the Flex. On the other hand, if one took the Flex and scored lower, then that would be unfair because they're essentially going up against people who took an easier and more consistent test format. LSAC probably realizes that these exams have effects on people's lives and to change it just for their year or even just their test would make things problematic and needlessly complex. 

TL;DR, it would just make things more complicated to have to vary the difficulty for the Flex tests. 

 

I'd imagine that they'd just weight each question for more points than the regular one did, in that if you make a mistake you lose the same amount of points as you would if you took the full exam. 

Edited by navyblue11

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44 minutes ago, navyblue11 said:

I've heard that they're only giving out three sections (one of each category) instead of five with the Flex, so hopefully that'll help. But I'm the same in that I need breaks every now and then to clear my head, even if it means going to the washroom in an in-person exam. 

That's way more reasonable then, but it will hurt people whose strength is Logical Reasoning. I prefer the other format. They should just give you a break at home after 3 sections. Even at the exam center, it's not like they follow you to the washroom during the break. 

Edited by Trew

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15 minutes ago, jatthopefullawyer said:

I think I am going to sign up for fun and see what happens. I was scoring high 160's but test anxiety got to me. only got a 157. I already got accepted in a few schools, but not the best, if I end up getting 160+, I might have to take a gap year and apply next year 

One year of your life waiting around is not worth it. I went to Ottawa and transferred after first-year instead of your suggested route. I also had test day issues that dramatically decreased my practice scores. 

Edited by Trew

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Just now, Trew said:

One year of your life waiting around is not worth it. I went to Ottawa and transferred after first-year instead of your suggested route. I also had test day issues that dramatically decreased my practice scores. 

Where did you transfer to out of curiosity? 

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3 minutes ago, Astro said:

Where did you transfer to out of curiosity? 

Queen's and I also got into Western, but I could have gone to UofT or Osgoode imo, based on my first-year grades and their transfer requirements. I applied to both and didn't wait for their response after getting into my first choice. 

Edited by Trew
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12 hours ago, navyblue11 said:

So I just got an email that the LSATs are now being administered as LSAT-Flex. Basically, you do the same LSAT but from home and proctors watch you through the camera and mic. Both a human and a computer will review the footage afterwards to ensure the integrity of the test-taker. There will (apparently) be no breaks between sections unless they are part of your accommodations, and this option will be administered for those who were registered for the now-cancelled April LSAT and possibly beyond, depending on COVID-19 developments. 

Personally, I'm not sure what to think. I think there are pros and cons to this, in that you can take it in a lower-stress environment (your own home), but there's more likely to be distractions there. And of course, I'm definitely not a fan of the no-breaks development. Of course, there are more arguments to both sides. I was just wondering what everyone thinks about this - do you think this could signal something good or bad for the applicants of this year? 

 

I was initially planning to write the April LSAT and I’m glad I didn’t make that choice because I think with only three sections, it would be more difficult to get a good score. Also, what about the writing section? Or has that changed since the test went digital?

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11 hours ago, jatthopefullawyer said:

this is unfair. I would have loved to do 3 sections instead of 5. you also get to do it at home, which helps with stress. so unfair. that is life I guess 

I don't think it is unfair. It is unfair to have to plan an application to law school and finish your current degree in the midst of a global pandemic. It is unfair that some people's lives will be devastated financially by COVID and that some people will lose families and friends to this virus. It is not unfair that the LSAT is proctored online given the circumstances.

 

It is not the same conditions as a normal day at home; people are at home with all their roommates/family/pets/children and unable to ask them to leave for a couple of hours. If you ask me, that's a recipe for disruption. The format is changed, each question is higher stake. People who have practiced this test dozens of times will have to adapt for the online LSAT.  These are not ideal circumstances, for most.

 

Best of luck to everyone writing under these circumstances, I hope you get the scores you want ❤️ 

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As someone who is going to be taking the LSAT Flex as their first and (hopefully) only test, it makes me more nervous for sure. Logical reasoning is my best section and I rely on it weighing more than the others. Reading comp is hit or miss for me, I’ve gone -6 before but my last practice test I went -13. The no breaks rule I don’t mind because in the regular LSAT they give you a break after 3 sections, as far as I know. Hence, it is actually the same amount of test taking time with no break.
 

I’m surprised because I figured there was a reason why LR had two sections, making it weigh significantly more than the others. How dramatically will it affect my score if I rely on strong LR sections and am inconsistent on RC? Games I usually get 3 of them perfect, don’t have the speed to do all 4 yet. 
 

 

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1 hour ago, Toby1994 said:

As someone who is going to be taking the LSAT Flex as their first and (hopefully) only test, it makes me more nervous for sure. Logical reasoning is my best section and I rely on it weighing more than the others. Reading comp is hit or miss for me, I’ve gone -6 before but my last practice test I went -13. The no breaks rule I don’t mind because in the regular LSAT they give you a break after 3 sections, as far as I know. Hence, it is actually the same amount of test taking time with no break.
 

I’m surprised because I figured there was a reason why LR had two sections, making it weigh significantly more than the others. How dramatically will it affect my score if I rely on strong LR sections and am inconsistent on RC? Games I usually get 3 of them perfect, don’t have the speed to do all 4 yet. 
 

 

Take solace in the fact that everyone writing is dealing with the same circumstances, gotta adapt and be ready to do well in RC and LG. This will not be the first time in your legal career that you will be expected to execute in less than ideal circumstances.

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What is their reason for not mimicking the original format of the test? I don't see a problem with having the same sections with breaks in between. 

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14 minutes ago, Ontario said:

What is their reason for not mimicking the original format of the test? I don't see a problem with having the same sections with breaks in between. 

Not sure, I guess just too hard for the proctors to coordinate breaks when they're not in the room with you; for example, how would it work? Would you just awkwardly sit at the table doing nothing while they stare back at you through the camera? Or would you turn the camera and mic off and just turn it back on again for the next part of the test? If it were the latter, I don't think they can be sure that you aren't somehow cheating behind the scenes (not sure how you'd do that, though, but people are creative). 

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22 hours ago, Trew said:

Take solace in the fact that everyone writing is dealing with the same circumstances, gotta adapt and be ready to do well in RC and LG. This will not be the first time in your legal career that you will be expected to execute in less than ideal circumstances.

Is there any talk of weighing the LR section more than the other sections to remain closer to the usual LSAT?

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