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ChasingMountains

Ryerson vs TRU

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I'm from Ontario, and I have been accepted to Ryerson and TRU. It's always been my dream to go out West by the mountains for school (will return to ON to practice), but considering my interests are in human rights, I feel that being in Toronto would allow me to network better. Also, not having to article is such a steal. Throw the pros and cons at me! Brutally honest opinions are appreciated lol.

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I don't know anything about either school so I can't help with the comparison, plus it's hard to say anything about Ryerson with much certainty, but everyone will (rightfully) tell you to go to school where you want to practice. If you want to practice in Ontario, go to Ryerson.

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29 minutes ago, ChasingMountains said:

I'm from Ontario, and I have been accepted to Ryerson and TRU. It's always been my dream to go out West by the mountains for school (will return to ON to practice), but considering my interests are in human rights, I feel that being in Toronto would allow me to network better. Also, not having to article is such a steal. Throw the pros and cons at me! Brutally honest opinions are appreciated lol.

You already seem to be inclined to accept Ryerson's offer; you should go to Ryerson if you want to practice in Ontario.

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58 minutes ago, ChasingMountains said:

I'm from Ontario, and I have been accepted to Ryerson and TRU. It's always been my dream to go out West by the mountains for school (will return to ON to practice), but considering my interests are in human rights, I feel that being in Toronto would allow me to network better. Also, not having to article is such a steal. Throw the pros and cons at me! Brutally honest opinions are appreciated lol.

If it is your dream to go out West by the mountains for school, it is not a terrible idea to attend TRU. Kamloops is in a valley, and mountains are unavoidable. 

Yes, if you want to practice in Ontario, it will be easier if you attend law school there, but it is not impossible to study in BC and get an articling position in Ontario.

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My $0.02. I wouldn't count on "not articling" until you're sure how your prospective employers would look at that. I work with someone from Lakehead, and I think the school offers the same deal, but I don't know if my colleague skipped articling altogether. I know they clerked before being hired though.

I also think you'll also need to figure out what you mean by "human rights" law, because in my experience  this isn't an area of practice as much as it is the type of cases you work within a practice area. And you may not have the luxury of picking your own cases to start with.  Also, a focus on "human rights" limits your prospective employers so tailoring your experience to what they look for will be important.

That said, I'll echo what's been said. The general rule is to go to school where you want to practice, unless the farther school offers a clear advantage. I don't think in your circumstances TRU does, so I would say go to Ryerson. 

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13 minutes ago, TheAEGIS said:

My $0.02. I wouldn't count on "not articling" until you're sure how your prospective employers would look at that.

Bingo. There is almost no chance any respectable employer is going to treat a fresh Ryerson grad as a first year associate and hire them accordingly. Most likely they will be treated like articling students in terms of their strating pay and program, regardless of the formal requirements. But if they don't it will be even worse for Ryerson grads, because no employer in their right mind is going to hire a Ryerson grad straight out of school for a first year associate position over someone who graduated from another school and already articled (in addition to having volunteer and clinical experience that is thus far unavailable at Ryerson and is easily equivalent to Ryerson's external placement program that somehow got them the articling exemption).

I will give Ryerson credit though; obviously this has been a great marketing tool, as illustrated by all the comments like the OP's on this site.

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Go to Ryerson if you want to work and live in Ontario.  You can vacation and visit the mountain when you are working.

Not articling isnt a good thing and as others have said dont count on it.  Also, human rights law is pretty broad and as one poster you might have to narrow that down to follow that path in any real form.

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