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ricketycricket

Windsor vs. Queen's

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Would love any insight from current applicants, current students, and/or alumni on how they would evaluate and compare these two programs. As of now, I have been accepted to both and need to make a decision in the next few days with the provisional acceptance deadline next week. 

My ultimate goal is to work in sports/entertainment law, specifically to be a player agent. I understand this is incredibly niche, and regardless, I would likely need some "biglaw" summer experience. I know that Queen's has a slightly higher placement rate than Windsor for Toronto firms. I went to Queen's for undergrad, so I know the environment and what Kingston is like. I would prefer a change of scenery but I'm trying to avoid placing too much emphasis on location in my decision. Any guidance/insights/advice would be greatly appreciated!

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I vote Windsor, there is a big emphasis on sports law (and it is right next to detroit) and they have some heavy hitters in terms of professors who also work in sports law. 

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how are people even debating these two? western and queen's is a fair comparison to make for big law, not these two.  

Edited by jatthopefullawyer
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