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watermelonline

studying for the LSAT for the first time ever

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i'm planning to take the LSAT on August 29 for the first time.

i'll likely start studying after my finals (so around the end of april). this is the first time i'll be studying any logic or lsat related stuff, ever- any tips on how to start or how to study? (i can't afford a tutor/classes so i'll be studying mostly on my own)

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I studied on my own and did well; tutoring/classes definitely aren't necessary for everyone. Not all LSAT prep books are created equal, so I'd get a couple from a few different publishers (I really liked my McGraw-Hill one!) and see what works for you. Practice really does make perfect; after learning all of the question types and strategies for each, I wrote a practice LSAT once or twice a week, and spent the rest of my time reviewing question types with which I was struggling.

I believe that there's been some mention elsewhere in this forum regarding newly free LSAT prep resources, so you could take advantage of those too.

Best of luck with studying, and feel free to ask more questions!

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14 hours ago, sdh92 said:

I studied on my own and did well; tutoring/classes definitely aren't necessary for everyone. Not all LSAT prep books are created equal, so I'd get a couple from a few different publishers (I really liked my McGraw-Hill one!) and see what works for you. Practice really does make perfect; after learning all of the question types and strategies for each, I wrote a practice LSAT once or twice a week, and spent the rest of my time reviewing question types with which I was struggling.

I believe that there's been some mention elsewhere in this forum regarding newly free LSAT prep resources, so you could take advantage of those too.

Best of luck with studying, and feel free to ask more questions!

 

I feel that OP should follow sdh92's advice. But I want to add a few more things. I also did not take any LSAT tutoring or classes and was fine, but obviously, everyone is different and you should do what you feel is comfortable. Regardless what what method you choose though, commitment and consistency I feel are the most important yet overlooked things.

If you are serious about this, treat it like school/work. For example, wake up at 9 am every single day (minus rest days) and study for the same amount of time everyday if possible. Take breaks in between where appropriate, but treat it like a job. Does not have to be long. You can study for 2 hours a day if you want but make sure you are actually paying attention and using that time rather than looking at your phone every minute. 

At first you can practice by reading prep books and doing questions from older LSAT exams. When you feel confident in doing those questions then you can do a practice exam. When you finish, make sure that you do a blind review.  Again, a big part of this is commitment, since many have the urge to just look at the answers and go: "ohh yea I get it."

As for resources, you can check on the Khan Academy's free LSAT class for starters, and you can get almost all past exams for free through websites such as Libgen.

Good luck!

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On 3/25/2020 at 2:04 AM, watermelonline said:

i'm planning to take the LSAT on August 29 for the first time.

i'll likely start studying after my finals (so around the end of april). this is the first time i'll be studying any logic or lsat related stuff, ever- any tips on how to start or how to study? (i can't afford a tutor/classes so i'll be studying mostly on my own)

I did fine and I studied by myself because I had no money for a tutor or any sort of classes. I think the past few comments covered a good chunk of information and very good advice. For me I would say that my biggest regret is the AirB&B I booked. The neighbors were partying the whole night (yes I called police but they kept on restarting the party) and I wrote the LSAT with NO sleep. My score turned out to be >~7 points less than my practice exams but it is still a good mark to get me into many ontario schools but it's a regret for sure and I had no money to retake the LSAT which sucks. 

So my advice for you is to make sure that you don't burn out, maintain an optimal stress level and make sure that you are relaxed towards the end of your studying schedule. Really take care of your health (physical, mental, emotaionl)!! I know it is easier said than done. If you have to travel for the LSAT make sure you book a place that is quiet and safe and make sure that on the test day you can give it 100%! 

Good luck!

 

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Further to YeetLaw's post, I managed to score high 160s using the free study material from Khan Academy so I would recommend going that route. I studied 1 hour a day using their program last summer (I worked full-time and studied during my lunch break). My tip would be to not neglect the areas you believe yourself to be strong in. For instance, if you think you're really good at reading comprehension right off the bat, make sure to really develop your skills in that area because it ease a lot of stress knowing that you have at least 1 section down pat. That helped for me anyways! 

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Oft-repeated but good advice: take a practice LSAT once before you really start studying as a baseline. That way you know how much you need to improve to get to your target score.

Doing lots of full timed practice tests is the best thing, but if you don't have time for those doing timed sections is great too. I worked full-time when I was studying so my routine was doing timed sections in the evenings on weekdays and two timed tests each day of the weekend. Do whatever fits your schedule best.

Download a proctor app to use during your practice tests. I used the 7sage app, which I liked because (if I remember correctly) it had ambient noise to further simulate the kind of environment you'll take the test in.

Most importantly, don't burn out. Have one day a week that you don't study. It might feel like wasted time, but it'll actually allow you to recharge and focus better when you are studying.

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