Jump to content
throwaway1001

Summer position during COVID19

Recommended Posts

Is there a reason that none of you seem to be addressing this question to the firm that hired you? 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

Is there a reason that none of you seem to be addressing this question to the firm that hired you? 

I imagine most of us have been in touch with our employers, but have received some variant of "details TBC". It's helpful to compare information about what other firms have communicated or decided, without having to pester our own employers with incessant questions.

I'm really sorry for occupying so much moderator time amidst a global crisis (sincerely). But I think many students are concerned that this issue could mean the difference between earning $20k + this summer and earning nothing.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

Is there a reason that none of you seem to be addressing this question to the firm that hired you? 

Many firms and organizations haven't even responded to inquiries, let alone decided what's going to happen. Patience is best, but the anxiety is rough being stuck inside I imagine.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, FortifiedEight said:

I heard that McMillan cancelled their program, but when I followed up with an articling student at McMillan, they said they hadn't heard that was the case. Can anyone confirm?

I've received clarification that this is NOT the case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Many firms and organizations haven't even responded to inquiries, let alone decided what's going to happen. Patience is best, but the anxiety is rough being stuck inside I imagine.

Trust me, I'm aware that decisions haven't been made. I'm a lawyer, remember? ;)  We have been communicating with our students to keep them informed of where we are in the process of making this type of decision. 

Although it's natural to ask here, I just wondered why anyone thinks that they're going to find answers here that they can't get from their own future employers.

  • Like 1
  • Confused 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, erinl2 said:

Although it's natural to ask here, I just wondered why anyone thinks that they're going to find answers here that they can't get from their own future employers.

Firms tend to move in lock step, or at least take very similar positions in these sorts of situations. Apparently, most of the student directors are talking every day and comparing strategies, so if one person gets info, even if it's from a different firm, it's helpful. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, CoffeeandLaw said:

Firms tend to move in lock step, or at least take very similar positions in these sorts of situations. Apparently, most of the student directors are talking every day and comparing strategies, so if one person gets info, even if it's from a different firm, it's helpful. 

That's somewhat of an overstatement as there are all types of employers across the country and not all are going to be moving in lockstep, even if a small percentage of employers will.  

Best to be in touch with your employer directly. I get that students are anxious. Hang in there. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s obviously a crazy time, so not surprising that decisions aren’t made on the student front. Things keep changing day to day on the client front, so not like students are getting the short end here. 

I’d expect start dates to be delayed, as you can’t bring in new employees who have never done this and expect them to work remotely. And you can’t extend the term as there isn’t extra resources for a prolonged overlap with articling students (not only financial, but tech and space issues).

Hang in there. Hopefully June start dates are workable, and a condensed summer can still be helpful, but let’s keep everything in perspective here. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 3/30/2020 at 4:01 PM, Dgfragus said:

For those that have been delayed, any chances that you will be paid for the 4 weeks that have been missed?

Can confirm that this is happening for my colleague (another 1L)

Edited by throwaway1001

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, throwaway1001 said:

Can confirm that this is happening for my colleague (another 1L)

What size firm is this at?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should we contact the firm to ask what they plan to do if we have not heard from them yet? I don't want to come across as indifferent, but also don't want to seem impatient. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, honeycrispapple said:

Should we contact the firm to ask what they plan to do if we have not heard from them yet? I don't want to come across as indifferent, but also don't want to seem impatient. 

Have you heard nothing at all, or have you heard that they will keep you updated?

If the former, you should reach out. If the latter, they told you they would keep you updated so they likely will.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, easttowest said:

Have you heard nothing at all, or have you heard that they will keep you updated?

If the former, you should reach out. If the latter, they told you they would keep you updated so they likely will.

 

Nothing at all so far. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, honeycrispapple said:

 

Nothing at all so far. 

How big is the firm? If it's a big firm, they are definitely discussing this. I would be patient. (haven't heard from my firm as well). But if it's a small firm, I'd check in because I'm sure they have a ton of competing demands and may have not gotten to it yet.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, georgecostanzajr said:

How big is the firm? If it's a big firm, they are definitely discussing this. I would be patient. (haven't heard from my firm as well). But if it's a small firm, I'd check in because I'm sure they have a ton of competing demands and may have not gotten to it yet.

I'd say on the bigger side with ~100+ lawyers. Is this considered medium sized? Big? I don't know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, honeycrispapple said:

I'd say on the bigger side with ~100+ lawyers. Is this considered medium sized? Big? I don't know. 

(Assuming this is an OCI-type firm that hired you in the fall) Have they sent you anything about the summer program? Start date, a questionnaire, forms they need you to fill out, etc? If so, just assume things are going ahead normally until you hear otherwise. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I'm still of the opinion that no news is good news. However I think it is worth following up proactively in situations where, say, you would like your employer to provide a firm update x weeks in advance of your start date so that you can plan out your housing situation, give your current landlord one month's notice if you still have a summer job to relocate for. In that case your email to your employer will contain a detailed explanation of details as to why the matter is particularly time-sensitive for you. Otherwise, I'm not sure asking will make a difference; I'm sure the firms know that we are all waiting and expecting to be updated ASAP on any decisions that will impact us, as soon as those decisions are firmed up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A large accounting firm let its 2L law students know that, basically, they should be prepared to be broken up with shortly. They have yet to write the Dear John note, though.

  • Sad 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • I have yet to go through the application process myself, so I am open to being wrong here. However, if I am not mistaken, yield protection is primarily an American tactic, no? I have been browsing various forums for a while and do not recall any instances of a Canadian applicant with grades and an LSAT score well above a school's median being rejected. I think the sensible (and most time-efficient) thing to do is to construct a general PS that nevertheless allows you to make note of specific things that make a school attractive to you (e.g. a particular clinic, journal or institute/centre for a specialized area of law)--what you might call a cookie cutter approach. At least that is what I have been doing, but maybe it won't work!  Since schools are simply looking for the best applicants, my guess is that they are less interested in the area you hope to work in and more so the quality of your application relative to everybody else's, in which case, you might as well just write about what it is you truly want to do irrespective of where you are applying. Whether they are completely indifferent is a different question, I think. Though, once more, I've never been on an admissions committee, so...
    • The information that helped me the most writing my personal statement is that it’s a 2-way street. You need to talk about yourself and maybe a specific event that made you develop an interest in law. However, schools want to attain a good “yield” which is the amount of offers accepted vs the amount of offers given. As part of the process, the admissions committee will read the statement and ask themselves, “how likely are they to accept an offer from us?”. This is not necessarily advice so you know what to write about, but it helped me because it made me stress less about writing a perfectly crafted letter that I hope they will like and made me focus on how I can fit in and bring value.
    • Schools do tend to have those kinds of reputations, though their reputation isn't necessarily what they're looking to see reflected in application materials. For instance, U of T has a reputation for being "corporate" but the school itself likes the idea that it is a pathway for people who want to further access to justice and lots of people emphasize their interest in the schools' legal clinic opportunities and reputable International Human Rights Program in their personal statements.  It really depends on the story you're trying to tell about yourself. In my view, "tailoring" your personal statement just means connecting your past experiences together in a narrative, expressing your plan for the future, and making the school look like the next logical step in your path. There are probably a lot of other ways to think about the personal statement, but this was how I thought about mine when I wrote it (admittedly over three years ago). If you're looking to target your personal statements to the law schools you're applying to, I would suggest thinking about concrete and practical things that each school has to offer, and how those things relate to your reasons for wanting to be a lawyer. For instance, if you know that one school has a legal clinic which does bird law and you're interested in bird law, then you'd want to point out that clinic as part of why you're applying to the school/ why the school fits into the overall narrative you're trying to put forward in your personal statement. You can do the same sort of thing with profs (i.e., if school A has Canada's top 3 scholars in bird law, you can emphasize your interest in bird law and whatever bird law-specific courses School A offers in that area). You can get information about this from schools' websites and by asking current students about what they think of their schools' programs in your areas of interest. Hope this helps! To clarify, all the above are considerations on top of whatever requirement the school sets out for the personal statements' contents and structure. Also, if you're from out of province or from the other side of the province, you should give some location-related indication of why you want to go to a particular school. If you have one.
    • They just mean that they’ve tailored their statements to the specific strengths, concentrations, and/or missions of the school. Some people will also discuss how they’d want to practice in the market where the school is located. Schools like uOttawa also have particular components that they look for when reading personal statements. This info is available on their Common Law website. Here’s the link:  https://commonlaw.uottawa.ca/en/students/admissions/how-to-apply/writing-your-personal-statement  Best of luck to you! 

×
×
  • Create New...