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Articling during COVID-19 shutdown

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1 hour ago, easttowest said:

I’ll reply by PM. I’ve heard from two places now but all grapevine. I’d imagine similar announcements will follow at other shops.

But then if people don't start articles until September, how will they get their 10 months articles done in time for June convocation (assuming 2021 timetable doesn't change)?

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39 minutes ago, hmyo said:

But then if people don't start articles until September, how will they get their 10 months articles done in time for June convocation (assuming 2021 timetable doesn't change)?

Logic would dictate that they wont make it in time for the June 2021 call, unless the articles are abridged. 

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37 minutes ago, Kfirnik said:

Logic would dictate that they wont make it in time for the June 2021 call, unless the articles are abridged. 

There’s no way large firms force their articling students to miss being called. They’ve either been in touch with the LSO who’s considering allowing another administrative call to the bar or they have something else up their sleeve.

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On 4/13/2020 at 9:01 PM, InsertPseudonymHere said:

I'm sorry but I truly do not understand how someone can call the Ontario bar exam a joke. It's far from a joke. Yes, it's not as hard as certain states, but that does not make it a joke.

It's draining to sit there and read through all those pages for the ~1.5 months you get to study (if you write both in June). It's hard to get a solid grasp on every single concept in those materials in that timeframe. Is it very doable? Yes. Is it a joke? No. 

I would never tell someone about to study for the bar that it's a joke. It's very doable, but requires a lot of work and dedication. It's a grind more than anything. 

The main problem with this approach is sitting down and reading all of those pages for 1.5mths. The bar exam is not a test about how well you retain information - it's about how quickly you can find the information. Because of circumstances I'm not going to get into I only had 2 weeks to study for the bar. That was enough time to put together a good index with my study group (although in retrospect I probably should have just bought it) and do a crap load of practice tests to get used to using my index. 

Don't waste time reading - use the time to practice and you'll be fine. 

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12 hours ago, Kfirnik said:

Logic would dictate that they wont make it in time for the June 2021 call, unless the articles are abridged. 

Logic would dictate the LSO and firms are working together as is evidenced by the accommodation of the start of articles to the later bar exam. The call will probably also be pushed back.

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Just received a call from the LSO. My request for abridgement was extended from 6 weeks to 9 weeks! They advised me that for the time being, they won’t go past 9 weeks.
 

The good news is that the extra 3 weeks covers me completely and I am now finished Articling!

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3 minutes ago, ottawhat said:

Just received a call from the LSO. My request for abridgement was extended from 6 weeks to 9 weeks! They advised me that for the time being, they won’t go past 9 weeks.
 

The good news is that the extra 3 weeks covers me completely and I am now finished Articling!

It's encouraging to see reasonable decisions being made.

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On 4/13/2020 at 9:01 PM, InsertPseudonymHere said:

I'm sorry but I truly do not understand how someone can call the Ontario bar exam a joke. It's far from a joke. Yes, it's not as hard as certain states, but that does not make it a joke.

It's draining to sit there and read through all those pages for the ~1.5 months you get to study (if you write both in June). It's hard to get a solid grasp on every single concept in those materials in that timeframe. Is it very doable? Yes. Is it a joke? No. 

I would never tell someone about to study for the bar that it's a joke. It's very doable, but requires a lot of work and dedication. It's a grind more than anything. 

The Ontario Bar is a joke. Almost everyone passes it, something like 90%. You don't need to study for 1.5 months. A week or two for each is fine. You just need to create an index to know where to look rather than learning the concepts. You'll do fine. 

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This debate is incredibly pointless. For some, the bar will be a joke. For others, it will require months of studying to scrape by. Just like how some people can blindly write the LSAT and get a 170, while others can study for months and still not break 150. The bar doesn't worry me too much because I thrive in MC exams, but it's pretty easy to see how somebody else could struggle.

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15 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

This debate is incredibly pointless. For some, the bar will be a joke. For others, it will require months of studying to scrape by. Just like how some people can blindly write the LSAT and get a 170, while others can study for months and still not break 150. The bar doesn't worry me too much because I thrive in MC exams, but it's pretty easy to see how somebody else could struggle.

Ok, but @TheScientist101 ‘s point is valid: trying to commit the concepts to memory, as opposed to practising finding them and applying them, is objectively the wrong way to prepare for this sort of assessment. 

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4 minutes ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

Ok, but @TheScientist101 ‘s point is valid: trying to commit the concepts to memory, as opposed to practising finding them and applying them, is objectively the wrong way to prepare for this sort of assessment. 

Agreed. Even the things I knew, I looked up *just to make sure*, thus the point of knowing them in the first place was somewhat useless.

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31 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

This debate is incredibly pointless. For some, the bar will be a joke. For others, it will require months of studying to scrape by. Just like how some people can blindly write the LSAT and get a 170, while others can study for months and still not break 150. The bar doesn't worry me too much because I thrive in MC exams, but it's pretty easy to see how somebody else could struggle.

It's one thing to struggle because of inherent ability/personality/etc., but another to make the struggle even harder by increasing the difficulty for no reason.  

For example, people of varying degrees of fitness can train for a marathon and finish a marathon. Some will have to train harder than others. But if you train for the marathon by running backwards, then adding the backwards part is totally on you. It could work, but it's probably not the optimal training method. You'll also probably be better than other marathoners at running backwards, but the marathon is not testing you on that. 

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45 minutes ago, chaboywb said:

For some, the bar will be a joke. For others, it will require months of studying to scrape by.

And, as long as you pass, you'll never know whether you nailed every question or just barely made a passing grade! This makes it hard to give or take advice on how to prepare. 

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17 minutes ago, whereverjustice said:

And, as long as you pass, you'll never know whether you nailed every question or just barely made a passing grade! This makes it hard to give or take advice on how to prepare. 

I would pay good money to know what I got on the solicitors because I suspect it was right on the line . Some friends and I agreed that the passing rate must have been about 30% 😅

Edited by CoffeeandLaw

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On 4/13/2020 at 2:44 PM, chaboywb said:

When I was articling, I worked 100 hours on a slow week! And to get to the office, I'd have to walk down Bay Street through six feet of snow... uphill, both ways!

You had an office? LUXURY.

We use to just have a corridor, all 126 of us, no desks. Half the floor was missing, we were all huddled in one corner for fear of FALLING. 

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9 minutes ago, CoffeeandLaw said:

I would pay good money to know what I got on the solicitors because I suspect it was right on the line 😅

Read these materials in 2 very long days. 
 

I’ve never experience such boredom (or neck pain). 

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16 minutes ago, CoffeeandLaw said:

I would pay good money to know what I got on the solicitors because I suspect it was right on the line 😅

Do you know what they call the guy who finishes last in his class and gets 50.1% on his bar exams? 

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6 minutes ago, OWH said:

Do you know what they call the guy who finishes last in his class and gets 50.1% on his bar exams? 

Unemployable? 

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7 minutes ago, OWH said:

gets 50.1% on his bar exams? 

I know it's not the point of the question, but I don't think 50% is necessarily a pass on the Ontario bar exams. The LSO won't say what score is a pass.

Quote

At the same time that it sets a Licensing Examination, the Advisory Group also formally sets and approves the passing mark for that Licensing Examination. The passing mark is the same for each different version of the same Licensing Examination. The passing mark represents a single overall score for the Licensing Examination; candidates are not required to individually pass separate sections or areas of law on a Licensing Examination.

The passing mark represents the expected performance of a minimally-competent entry-level lawyer. To ensure consistency between each sitting of the Licensing Examinations, the Advisory Groups apply this same standard to the particular set of items on each Licensing Examination. The setting of a passing mark is based on the judgment of these informed subject matter experts and is determined through rigorous consultation and dialogue.

This approach to setting the passing mark helps to ensure that the same performance standard is applied consistently for each Licensing Examination, so that only those candidates who meet or exceed this standard will pass the Licensing Examination. Only an individual candidate’s performance compared to this standard determines whether that candidate passes the Licensing Examination; the candidate’s performance is not assessed in comparison to the performance of other candidates, by using a curve or otherwise. There is also no pre-determined rate for the proportion of candidates who will pass a Licensing Examination.

https://lso.ca/becoming-licensed/lawyer-licensing-process/licensing-examinations/guide-to-licensing-examinations

 

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