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HuggyBear

Torys reception, worth going?

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I was at the welcome day on Saturday and liked what I saw/heard, just wondering if I'm going to be missing anything super important at the reception. Other than networking. I'd have to skip work tomorrow to attend, and I'm on the fence about calling in sick.

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I'm in the same boat, and I also didn't attend welcome day.

What were your first impressions of the facilities and the faculty based on your experiences from Welcome Day?

Any lingering concerns?

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3 hours ago, HomerSampson said:

I'm in the same boat, and I also didn't attend welcome day.

What were your first impressions of the facilities and the faculty based on your experiences from Welcome Day?

Any lingering concerns?

I went to welcome day and was pleasantly surprised. I loved how all the classes are in the law building. Very collegial atmosphere. Everyone was extremely friendly and welcoming. The building did seem a little outdated, but still nice. That being said, I did find the law clinics to be a little dungeony ex. no windows and sort of dark. Overall, I would be thrilled to be attending Western though. 

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I was very happy overall. Not crazy about the size of campus, coming from Guelph, but it seems as though my activities as a law student will be mostly confined to the law building which sort of negates that con. Frankly, the dean didn't seem all too thrilled to be manning a booth at the information fair. Would love to hear others' impressions of her. Other faculty seemed great.

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16 minutes ago, HuggyBear said:

I was very happy overall. Not crazy about the size of campus, coming from Guelph, but it seems as though my activities as a law student will be mostly confined to the law building which sort of negates that con. Frankly, the dean didn't seem all too thrilled to be manning a booth at the information fair. Would love to hear others' impressions of her. Other faculty seemed great.

That Dean sounded like a robot. 

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2 hours ago, intellectualpossum said:

I loved how all the classes are in the law building. 

I hope this question doesn't make me look like an idiot, but... wouldn't this be the case for all law schools in Canada? Perhaps I'm naive, but, I figured since every single law school has its own building, it would be reasonable to assume that this is where all the classes would be?

Or is the case, for some schools, that the law faculty's building is more of an administrative building, and classes would be all over?

-GM

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Hey! I actually go to Western and the Welcome Day and Tory's Reception were a big reason for why I chose to come to Western. 

The Tory's Reception isn't so much as networking as it is meeting current students and being able to talk to them about their experiences, why they chose Western and asking questions. I had a few doubts about Western and the students I spoke to at the reception ultimately shifted me to a strong yes. I honestly chose Western for the social environment over everything.

Would highly recommend attending if you can!! 

Edit: Totally just realized the event was today. But if you have any questions in case you missed the event, feel free to reach out :)

Edited by kunaRT
date mix

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9 hours ago, kunaRT said:

Would highly recommend attending if you can!! 

I ended up going, it was alright. A little less structured than this introvert would have liked. I will most likely be accepting my offer to Western, depending on how my visit to Dalhousie goes. 

I didn't get a chance to ask anyone, but how did you find you had to adapt your study/work habits going from undergrad to law?

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I did an undergrad in science and thought it would be a difficult transition. But honestly everyone came from very different undergrads. I know only some who did criminology or political science, all of whom still had to learn the content pretty much from base up like all of us either way. I think what I struggled most with was adapting to the type of writing the legal field wants which is super concise and straight to the point. I didn’t do a lot of papers or develop much of my writing skills during undergrad so the legal writing (LRWA) course was a but it an adaptation. 

The main thing anyone has to adapt to is the amount of reading and keeping up with the coursework. It’s really easy to fall behind, but depending on your time management and learning style very manageable. I might go as far as saying the everyday lifestyle is much chiller than undergrad because you’re not studying for tests all the time, just end of term exams. The only assignments you have are the LRWA assignments first term, but you’re free after. Weekends are your best friend. I honestly reserve those for getting my work prepped for the week, leaving you a lot more time to chill during the week or take on moots, info sessions, etc. You are your “time clock” so it’s how you want to set it up so you’re caught up and not dying at the end of the term studying for exams (cause you need like a month to prep for exams).

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On 3/2/2020 at 8:32 PM, GrumpyMountie said:

I hope this question doesn't make me look like an idiot, but... wouldn't this be the case for all law schools in Canada? Perhaps I'm naive, but, I figured since every single law school has its own building, it would be reasonable to assume that this is where all the classes would be?

Or is the case, for some schools, that the law faculty's building is more of an administrative building, and classes would be all over?

-GM

All classes are in the law building at Western Law.

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On 3/2/2020 at 6:32 PM, GrumpyMountie said:

I hope this question doesn't make me look like an idiot, but... wouldn't this be the case for all law schools in Canada? Perhaps I'm naive, but, I figured since every single law school has its own building, it would be reasonable to assume that this is where all the classes would be?

Or is the case, for some schools, that the law faculty's building is more of an administrative building, and classes would be all over?

I've taught at several schools and know quite a bit about a few others and I'm not aware of a single Canadian law school where students don't have the majority of their classes in the law building. I can think of at least one where some classes may be held elsewhere, with the majority still being in the law building.

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People tell me that coming from a Psych background will be helpful with writing in law school, but just how similar are literature reviews and research reports to the writing we will be doing? If anything I feel like lab reports in the sciences would be more similar, to the extent that you are trying to be concise. 

3 hours ago, kunaRT said:

The main thing anyone has to adapt to is the amount of reading..

This is really my main concern, as someone who got by in undergrad not doing many of the readings. I got better in my last year at staying on top of readings, but lectures in undergrad seemed to echo the content which I'm gathering won't necessarily be the case at law school.

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10 minutes ago, HuggyBear said:

People tell me that coming from a Psych background will be helpful with writing in law school, but just how similar are literature reviews and research reports to the writing we will be doing? If anything I feel like lab reports in the sciences would be more similar, to the extent that you are trying to be concise. 

This is really my main concern, as someone who got by in undergrad not doing many of the readings. I got better in my last year at staying on top of readings, but lectures in undergrad seemed to echo the content which I'm gathering won't necessarily be the case at law school.

 People are wrong. Educational background is neutral.

 

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14 minutes ago, HuggyBear said:

This is really my main concern, as someone who got by in undergrad not doing many of the readings. I got better in my last year at staying on top of readings, but lectures in undergrad seemed to echo the content which I'm gathering won't necessarily be the case at law school.

I am sharing the same concerns. most of my lectures had the same info as readings, so there was not a point of doing them. law school is going to be a different ball game 

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Most of the lectures are direct reflections of the readings! But how useful the readings are really depends on the professor and the class. It's hard to say how much you will rely on. Some profs go so in depth you don't really need to read the textbook for anything more than clarification (I didn't even open one of the textbooks I bought even once all semester). But overall, its helpful to do the readings because some professors will just pull out the main points and principles of the cases you talk about, etc. so it's nice to have the background context of how and were those came from. The readings are just more in-depth and give you the full picture whereas the prof will help decipher the sometimes difficult/confusing decisions of judges to guide you. Like I said, it really depends on the court and the style of profs teaching --- probably similar to undergrad in the sense. Personally, I did most of the readings for 3.5/5 courses (so most). Participation is also part of your mark, in first year at least, so it's helpful to know the content ahead of class. 

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On 3/2/2020 at 8:17 PM, OnlyResident said:

That Dean sounded like a robot. 

Just FYI, the Dean is actually wicked smart, an excellent professor, and a lovely person.

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1 hour ago, beyondsection17 said:

Just FYI, the Dean is actually wicked smart, an excellent professor, and a lovely person.

Might have been an off day for her. She was more lively at the reception, for sure.

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1 hour ago, HuggyBear said:

Might have been an off day for her. She was more lively at the reception, for sure.

I think you get a better sense of her one on one, or in smaller groups. She's awesome, really cares about the school and students, and is very nice.

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