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Puneet

Transferring from Ontario to Bc right after LPP and Call to bar

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Hello Everyone, I have been trying to get articling in BC from over a year now but no luck yet... I am going to take LPP program during summer this year at Ryerson University, Toronto.

I want to know if it is possible to transfer license from Ontario to Bc right after call to bar in Ontario.

I have checked the rules on lsbc website but I am still confused if i need to do articling and PLTC even after getting license in ontario.

Please suggest if anybody did that recently.

Thank You......

 

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I just reviewed the LSBC site. It appears to unambiguously answer your question. 

 

Unsolicited advice: this sounds like a terrible idea. 

As you know, we don't have a program in lieu of articling in BC. As a practicing lawyer in BC, I have never encountered anyone who has done Ontario's LPP and is practicing in BC (that does not mean they are not out there, but there cannot be many). 

I don't know what your plans are after you return to BC, but I cannot imagine the BC legal job market being any more inviting to you when you return without ever having worked a legal job. Most BC legal employers were Called years or decades ago, and they have never even heard of the LPP. 

 

If you go this route, you really should consider spending a year or two working in Ontario before you transfer to BC, even if it isn't  strictly required.   

Edited by QuincyWagstaff
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1 hour ago, Puneet said:

Hello Everyone, I have been trying to get articling in BC from over a year now but no luck yet... I am going to take LPP program during summer this year at Ryerson University, Toronto.

I want to know if it is possible to transfer license from Ontario to Bc right after call to bar in Ontario.

I have checked the rules on lsbc website but I am still confused if i need to do articling and PLTC even after getting license in ontario.

Please suggest if anybody did that recently.

Thank You......

 

Not even articling for free? 

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Not at all... I have tried every way possible. Used references, cold emails, walk ins, phone calls. But nothing worked out... 

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I don't have any inside knowledge about this, but I also agree with Quincy in that even if you might technically be able to transfer from Ontario to BC immediately post-LPP, it's probably worth working for even a year as an associate in Ontario. IMO, even a year's worth of experience will probably make it vastly easier to find employment back in BC. 

Edited by spicyfoodftw

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I transferred my licence between Provinces and it is an onerous process. You don't actually "transfer" the licence, you have to apply to get called to the bar in BC. No, you do not need to do articling and PLTC in BC if you are already called to the Bar in Ontario. Depending on the time lapse you may have to take the exams, but I believe that time period is 3 years of not practicing so you will likely be ok. 

Applying to transfer will cost you an extra $1200 up front. It will probably take 6 weeks-2 months for them to process the transfer. You have to get someone in BC who is a lawyer to vouch for you (which may be difficult if you don't know any lawyers here). You need legal references in Ontario to vouch for you as well.  Then, once you are called you have to pay the regular bar fees that year. At this point, you will be called in 2 jurisdictions so will be paying bar fees in Ontario as well (so in sum, thousands of dollars). If you want to "transfer" your licence, then you have to apply to formally surrender your Ontario licence, which is more paperwork and time (though free).  

So, say you get called in Ontario, it will probably take a few months before you could start practicing in BC, and if you don't have an employer willing to wait this time and pay the fees, it will put you in a difficult situation I'm assuming. 

So, while yes, there is the National Mobility Agreement, it is an onerous and expensive process to move licences. Personally, I transferred to BC after years of working in Ontario, and had a job lined up when I transferred who were willing to pay for the fees and it was still a massive pain in the ass and my employer had to deal with a wait time before I could practice (and yes, this was with me constantly calling the law society and making the urgency known). 

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35 minutes ago, azure said:

I transferred my licence between Provinces and it is an onerous process. You don't actually "transfer" the licence, you have to apply to get called to the bar in BC. No, you do not need to do articling and PLTC in BC if you are already called to the Bar in Ontario. Depending on the time lapse you may have to take the exams, but I believe that time period is 3 years of not practicing so you will likely be ok. 

Applying to transfer will cost you an extra $1200 up front. It will probably take 6 weeks-2 months for them to process the transfer. You have to get someone in BC who is a lawyer to vouch for you (which may be difficult if you don't know any lawyers here). You need legal references in Ontario to vouch for you as well.  Then, once you are called you have to pay the regular bar fees that year. At this point, you will be called in 2 jurisdictions so will be paying bar fees in Ontario as well (so in sum, thousands of dollars). If you want to "transfer" your licence, then you have to apply to formally surrender your Ontario licence, which is more paperwork and time (though free).  

So, say you get called in Ontario, it will probably take a few months before you could start practicing in BC, and if you don't have an employer willing to wait this time and pay the fees, it will put you in a difficult situation I'm assuming. 

So, while yes, there is the National Mobility Agreement, it is an onerous and expensive process to move licences. Personally, I transferred to BC after years of working in Ontario, and had a job lined up when I transferred who were willing to pay for the fees and it was still a massive pain in the ass and my employer had to deal with a wait time before I could practice (and yes, this was with me constantly calling the law society and making the urgency known). 

My application from ON to BC went through within a month of submitting the notarized documents. It's quicker to move as a brand new Call because there's nothing in your practice to wind up, and all of the background checks are based on information from a couple of months post-Call, instead of many years of practice.

I agree with the rest of azure's points, and cannot stress enough that it is hella expensive to move. You have to be fully paid up to the law society in your home jurisdiction before you can transfer (which in ON includes insurance fees). I'm going to assume your LPP placement won't be covering these. Then there's the application fee, then you pay for the Call and law society fees in your new jurisdiction. Hopefully by this point you have a firm willing to cover the BC fees! Otherwise yeah you're probably out ~$5k to just move.

If I did it again, I would (a) have tried to article in BC rather than move, or (b) stayed in ON for a little while to have some more experience on my resume before moving. Forget the application process - the job search was the hardest part. It was tough as a new Call to break into a market where no one knew me and I didn't have a big firm background. I can't imagine it would be any easier if you take the LPP. As Quincy mentioned, most people in BC have never encountered an LPP-trained lawyer and are probably going to be hesitant to take the risk.

Feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

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56 minutes ago, BertyBewp said:

My application from ON to BC went through within a month of submitting the notarized documents. It's quicker to move as a brand new Call because there's nothing in your practice to wind up, and all of the background checks are based on information from a couple of months post-Call, instead of many years of practice.

I agree with the rest of azure's points, and cannot stress enough that it is hella expensive to move. You have to be fully paid up to the law society in your home jurisdiction before you can transfer (which in ON includes insurance fees). I'm going to assume your LPP placement won't be covering these. Then there's the application fee, then you pay for the Call and law society fees in your new jurisdiction. Hopefully by this point you have a firm willing to cover the BC fees! Otherwise yeah you're probably out ~$5k to just move.

If I did it again, I would (a) have tried to article in BC rather than move, or (b) stayed in ON for a little while to have some more experience on my resume before moving. Forget the application process - the job search was the hardest part. It was tough as a new Call to break into a market where no one knew me and I didn't have a big firm background. I can't imagine it would be any easier if you take the LPP. As Quincy mentioned, most people in BC have never encountered an LPP-trained lawyer and are probably going to be hesitant to take the risk.

Feel free to reach out if you have any questions.

Yeah, I think some of my timing issue was getting the letter of status from Ontario, which took them a while to issue and send to BC. You might not need an update letter if you are freshly called. 

I articled and worked in Ontario and moved back to BC for personal reasons, and I know other lawyers who have done the same. Anyways, LPP seems like a temporary fix that is just delaying finding a job in BC for another year. If you are in Ontario and making connections there, you might be able to find a job after you are called there, get some experience, then move back (or maybe you'll love Toronto and stay!) 

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