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arixn

Canadian Bachelor to UK law?

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I'm currently a High School senior in Ontario planning to attend McGill this fall for my BA. I partially grew up in Europe and have dual citizenship in an EU country through my immigrant parents (I was born in Canada). All my life I've wanted to live in the UK and it feels more like home each time I visit. I have heard everywhere that you go to law school in the country you want to practice (ie. live in). The United States is off the table and I have no interest in paying exorbitant international fees when I currently live in a border city and am in the states every other weekend. I know that even if you didn't take A-levels in the UK you can do your BS in Canada take the BMAT or UKCAT instead of the MCAT which is standard in the US and Canada. Is there a similar loophole for the law/the LSATs? I don't want to apply and move to the UK straight out of High School and do their three-year program plus a BPTC. Essentially, what I'm asking is there any way I can practice law the UK (London law firm) if I do my B.A at McGill? 

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1 hour ago, arixn said:

I'm currently a High School senior in Ontario planning to attend McGill this fall for my BA. I partially grew up in Europe and have dual citizenship in an EU country through my immigrant parents (I was born in Canada). All my life I've wanted to live in the UK and it feels more like home each time I visit. I have heard everywhere that you go to law school in the country you want to practice (ie. live in). The United States is off the table and I have no interest in paying exorbitant international fees when I currently live in a border city and am in the states every other weekend. I know that even if you didn't take A-levels in the UK you can do your BS in Canada take the BMAT or UKCAT instead of the MCAT which is standard in the US and Canada. Is there a similar loophole for the law/the LSATs? I don't want to apply and move to the UK straight out of High School and do their three-year program plus a BPTC. Essentially, what I'm asking is there any way I can practice law the UK (London law firm) if I do my B.A at McGill? 

For starters, note that as of a couple days ago being a citizen of an EU country will no longer apparently help you move to the UK.  I'll leave immigration consequences aside other than to note that immigration far from automatic.

It's difficult to say because of course an LL.B. in the UK is an undergraduate degree, while a Canadian JD is usually a second degree.  That means that the UK produces an awful lot of LL.B. graduates, many of whom struggle to find a training contract.  That means there's no real need for UK law firms to go looking overseas for lawyers.

Your best bets are to either: study at a Canadian law school, get absolute top marks and then apply in London, or to study law in the UK and take your chances.

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3 hours ago, arixn said:

I'm currently a High School senior in Ontario planning to attend McGill this fall for my BA. I partially grew up in Europe and have dual citizenship in an EU country through my immigrant parents (I was born in Canada). All my life I've wanted to live in the UK and it feels more like home each time I visit. I have heard everywhere that you go to law school in the country you want to practice (ie. live in). The United States is off the table and I have no interest in paying exorbitant international fees when I currently live in a border city and am in the states every other weekend. I know that even if you didn't take A-levels in the UK you can do your BS in Canada take the BMAT or UKCAT instead of the MCAT which is standard in the US and Canada. Is there a similar loophole for the law/the LSATs? I don't want to apply and move to the UK straight out of High School and do their three-year program plus a BPTC. Essentially, what I'm asking is there any way I can practice law the UK (London law firm) if I do my B.A at McGill? 

I have a number of former classmates who appear to be practising in London after articling/practising in Canada, first. So, it is certainly possible to go to a Canadian law school and end up in England. 

However, I agree you should look into immigration issues at the outset, as you don't appear to have any status in the UK. 

 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but is OP asking if they can practice law in the UK without even going to law school, with just a BA from McGill and some sort of conversion exam afterward? 

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Your question is kindof all over the place, OP.

For starters, unless the citizenship you hold is Irish, EU citizenship will not be useful going forward to living and working in Britain, and you'll need to look at the immigration requirements.

It's not clear why you're referring to medical school requirements, but UK universities don't require the LSAT to study law, no. They have their own LNAT for undergraduate admissions.

If you hold an undergraduate degree, you can potentially do the Graduate Diploma in Law at a UK university, which would be a one year fulltime or two year part time course that would get you in a position to apply for training contracts etc (subject to immigration requirements). Or if you get a law degree in Canada and become qualified, you could potentially write the Qualified Lawyer Transfer Scheme (again, subject to immigration requirements). Bearing in mind at all times that the UK turns out far more law grads than could ever work as lawyers and the vast majority of LLB holders never will, so their firms do not need to sponsor international newly, barely qualified solicitors or barristers.

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12 hours ago, Deadpool said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but is OP asking if they can practice law in the UK without even going to law school, with just a BA from McGill and some sort of conversion exam afterward? 

I was wondering where I should go to law school if I want to practice in London. 

ie) If I wanted to practise in the US I could do my undergrad at McGill and the go to an American law school no problem but from what I know there is no post grad "law school" in the Uk just a 3 year program and some exams, so idk how it's possible for me to practice there 😕

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11 hours ago, lookingaround said:

Your question is kindof all over the place, OP.

For starters, unless the citizenship you hold is Irish, EU citizenship will not be useful going forward to living and working in Britain, and you'll need to look at the immigration requirements.

It's not clear why you're referring to medical school requirements, but UK universities don't require the LSAT to study law, no. They have their own LNAT for undergraduate admissions.

If you hold an undergraduate degree, you can potentially do the Graduate Diploma in Law at a UK university, which would be a one year fulltime or two year part time course that would get you in a position to apply for training contracts etc (subject to immigration requirements). Or if you get a law degree in Canada and become qualified, you could potentially write the Qualified Lawyer Transfer Scheme (again, subject to immigration requirements). Bearing in mind at all times that the UK turns out far more law grads than could ever work as lawyers and the vast majority of LLB holders never will, so their firms do not need to sponsor international newly, barely qualified solicitors or barristers.

Sorry for the confusion, both my parents are M.Ds so I know how it's possible to apply to med schools abroad after getting a BA in Canada, but when it comes to law school processes I'm lost. So I'm guessing it's not as easy as just taking the LNAT after getting a BA here and immigrating, and even then wouldn't I be in school with a bunch of kids fresh out of A-levels? From what everyone is telling me the job market is a lot better in Canada vs the UK or US so there is no point in leaving for uni except if I go to an ivy league or oxbridge, even then it would be ridiculously expensive and I'm guessing because of my "international" status it would be moot trying to find work in a major law firm. 

Thanks for getting back to me 

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15 hours ago, Malicious Prosecutor said:

For starters, note that as of a couple days ago being a citizen of an EU country will no longer apparently help you move to the UK.  I'll leave immigration consequences aside other than to note that immigration far from automatic.

It's difficult to say because of course an LL.B. in the UK is an undergraduate degree, while a Canadian JD is usually a second degree.  That means that the UK produces an awful lot of LL.B. graduates, many of whom struggle to find a training contract.  That means there's no real need for UK law firms to go looking overseas for lawyers.

Your best bets are to either: study at a Canadian law school, get absolute top marks and then apply in London, or to study law in the UK and take your chances.

Thank you so much for responding to my questions in such a concise and direct manner, it really helped.

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14 hours ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

I have a number of former classmates who appear to be practising in London after articling/practising in Canada, first. So, it is certainly possible to go to a Canadian law school and end up in England. 

However, I agree you should look into immigration issues at the outset, as you don't appear to have any status in the UK. 

 

Thank you so much, it's good to know I'm not "stuck" here if I get my J.D in Canada.

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On 2/3/2020 at 12:22 PM, QuincyWagstaff said:

I have a number of former classmates who appear to be practising in London after articling/practising in Canada, first. So, it is certainly possible to go to a Canadian law school and end up in England. 

However, I agree you should look into immigration issues at the outset, as you don't appear to have any status in the UK. 

 

Could you possibly let me know which law school they attended, and if you know which students have a better chance of transferring to the uk/internationally; McGill graduates or UoT graduates?

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On 2/6/2020 at 8:41 AM, arixn said:

Could you possibly let me know which law school they attended, and if you know which students have a better chance of transferring to the uk/internationally; McGill graduates or UoT graduates?

You can find this information out on your own: look at Canadian law firms that have an office in London and go through the bios of the associates and partners at those firms. 

 

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