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JFRA24

How do I convince admissions to accept a February LSAT?

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January is the cutoff. They're going to say no.

How do I change the "no" to a "yes"?

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All you can do is ask but I doubt that they will say yes.

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Is that all I can do? 

Are there specific people who are better than others to ask?

Are there better ways of asking than email?

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The February LSAT is on the 22nd which means scores won’t be released until mid-March. The last round of offers at uoft is early March. Id say 0% chance 

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How does the last round of offers work? Is it filling in the spots of people who said no in round 2?

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16 minutes ago, JFRA24 said:

How does the last round of offers work? Is it filling in the spots of people who said no in round 2?

The people who were admired in rounds 1 and 2 have until April 1st to decide. So I don’t think it’s related. I’m guessing they have a certain amount of offers they send out each year based on their historic yield. Maybe 350 offers for 200 spots to make something up as an example. 

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So, realistically, they might still have unfilled spots after all three official admission rounds.

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Based on the Facebook group, there have been at least 250 people admitted in the first two rounds for a class which will ultimately be 205-210 people. Do with that information what you will. I have no idea how the third round will work

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First of all doubtful they would accept it, but also why should you be the exception to their rule of February cutoff? Unless you have a really compelling argument, it seems very unfair to other applicants in your situation. They’re pretty clear about this, why do you merit special consideration? 

Even if they were to consider it, U of T has a pretty high yield rate, meaning most applicants who receive an offer from the school will accept. I don’t think too many acceptances will be made after February, but people may have past data that proves otherwise? 

Edited by albertabean

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3 hours ago, JFRA24 said:

So, realistically, they might still have unfilled spots after all three official admission rounds.

That's the purpose of the waitlist. During the third round (mid March) every applicant will get a decision: admit, reject, or waitlist. If too few people have accepted their offers before classes start, including cases where someone accepts and then withdraws for whatever reason, admissions can pull from the waitlist at any point up to the first week of classes to fill that seat.

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10 hours ago, JFRA24 said:

So, realistically, they might still have unfilled spots after all three official admission rounds.

U of T like many other schools has given out more offers than number of spots they have.. e.g  School A have 220 spots and they have given out say 300 offers  and these offers will expire on April 1. There will be additional offers when more than 80 applicants rejected their offer... 

This is my understanding of the process. Correct me if I am wrong. I don't think School will withhold offers until a later date.     

U of T like many other schools have a strict cut-off for LSAT score. Why would U of T make any exceptions for you?  

My application was rejected by U of T around Feb during my first cycle. I think rejections will be coming out soon.

Did you apply to other schools?

Edited by Luckycharm
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On 2/1/2020 at 10:03 PM, JFRA24 said:

January is the cutoff. They're going to say no.

How do I change the "no" to a "yes"?

I can say from experience that it is not a "0% chance" that UofT (or other schools) accept a late application, even with the LSAT pending in February. If you can give a reason, exceptions might be made. 

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1 hour ago, Onepost2020 said:

I can say from experience that it is not a "0% chance" that UofT (or other schools) accept a late application, even with the LSAT pending in February. If you can give a reason, exceptions might be made. 

I assume the candidate would have to be truly exceptional for this sort of exception to made though. A 159 LSAT with a "very low" cGPA is probably not going to meet their standards to make such an exception,  but that's just my intuition.  

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@JFRA24 I don't think this has been properly emphasized by others responding in any of your threads, but it's extremely unlikely you'll be accepted into the UofT JD program under any circumstances unless you both take significant additional undergraduate coursework and get excellent grades, and you rewrite the LSAT and get an exceptional score (and even that might not be enough).

You've referred to your undergraduate GPA as "dog shit." You have a 159 LSAT. Those aren't quite the only two factors that matter in admissions, but they are close to it.

You are banking on graduate studies and work experience to compensate. Those are softs at best, and won't do anything for you barring being truly exceptional (like, close to Nobel Prize winner-level).

You are hoping being a mature student will make a massive difference. It will make a marginal one.

Despite being nowhere close to competitive for entry into the JD program under any circumstances, you have asked how to convince them to accept a late LSAT and want them to rearrange their program for you. This indicates you really have not been properly understanding your situation. It's good that you seem to have very recently started to grasp that it is unlikely you will be admitted and you aren't dead set on a JD in any event.

Anyways, the thing I really wanted to tell you, just so you really understand your situation, is that I was rejected from UofT as a mature applicant with meaningful work experience but a poor CGPA myself, with a 99th percentile LSAT score. I even graduated from my bachelor's degree program with distinction and had medical documentation and an access claim for poor undergraduate performance at an earlier, separate attempt at undergrad studies. A friend of mine was also rejected under similar circumstances with a 98th percentile score but a poor cGPA. With how you have characterized your undergraduate GPA, I don't think you would get into UofT law with any LSAT score--they really don't like poor undergraduate grades regardless of all other factors. The upside of that is that it really doesn't matter if they don't accept your February score--it won't make any difference.

Not to dump on you way late after you've come to a bit of a revelation the other day--I would have responded to your threads earlier but I was restricted from posting until now. Do your self a favour: completely forget about the JD and focus on your PhD, since you don't want to delay any longer and the PhD is what you actually care about anyways.

Edited by CleanHands
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I appreciate the thoughtful response, CleanHands.

I'm still committed to rewriting this month (because I've already dropped the $200 fee and that ain't nothin' for me), but I'm sure not enthusiastic about it, because you're right, the JD ship has sailed.

If I nail it, I'll try and see what I can swing, but sure I won't be asking here about it again. I mentioned it elsewhere, but I have talked to program directors about potentially shifting things around, and they haven't said no. They haven't said, but they haven't said no.

Best of luck to the rest of you. 

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I know of a couple students at UofT who did JD/MA joint programs out of order (started their MA first). The Faculty didn't like it, but they didn't stop them. But they were accepted to both their JD and MA programs independently and both exceptional students. 

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