Jump to content
watermelonline

2nd year undergrad student already stressed for the LSAT and admissions

Recommended Posts

hey! i'm a second year undergrad student. i'm aiming to get into u of t law. i know it's very competitive, to say the least. i have no idea whatsoever in how to start studying for the LSAT. any tips for a beginner? 

also, what kind of extracurriculars or volunteering should i do? i have nothing special to write in my personal essays. 

i would appreciate any help at all,

thanks so much! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Worry about the LSAT after you finish your 3rd year of school. There's no point studying that early, especially since you'll need to do well in school in addition to the LSAT, and the latter can have an impact on the former.

Do extracurriculars or volunteering that you are passionate in. Admissions committees (and people hiring in the future) aren't stupid and can smell padded resumes a mile away. Being passionate about one thing is better than having 10 random extracurriculars like serving as secretary of meaningless undergrad clubs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Rashabon said:

Worry about the LSAT after you finish your 3rd year of school. There's no point studying that early, especially since you'll need to do well in school in addition to the LSAT, and the latter can have an impact on the former.

I don't think it's a bad idea to start early on the LSAT as long as it doesn't get in the way of school.  I just studied in the summer after first year and got it out of the way during the first week of 2nd year.  Contrary to school affecting LSAT, I think the necessary skills you need to do well on it can actually help you do even better at school - LR and RC for writing well-structured and logical essays, LG for applying rules better in language classes, etc.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While you definitely don't need to study and write it this year, I don't see much of a downside to doing so. Don't study too much during school if that'll impact your marks, but if you're able to start studying once your semester is over (end of April presumably), then you can set up your real test for September, July, or if your studying is going well, June. Anecdotally, I did the same thing (wrote the real thing in June between my second and third year) to give myself ample time to re-write if I had to, and I'm personally pretty happy I did that. 

To get started on studying, try out this test as a diagnostic without studying at all: https://www.lsac.org/sites/default/files/legacy/docs/default-source/jd-docs/sampleptjune.pdf. Be strict and time yourself as if it was the real thing - 35 minutes exactly per section. See how you do on it, see which sections are your weakest, and go from there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey!

I studied for the LSAT in the summer between 2nd and 3rd year. IMO it was a really ideal time to do it. I wrote the September LSAT which meant that I had all summer to study for it and tons of time to rewrite if I wasn't happy with my score. Compared to some of my peers that wrote between the summer before 4th year or early in the Fall of fourth year I was way less stressed because at that time I only had to focus on my applications, while many of them were feeling swamped with both applications and the LSAT, and knew they wouldn't have much time to retake the LSAT if it didn't go their way. 

To start, just write a timed diagnostic with no preparation- then you'll what ability level you are starting with and plan your studying based on that. Think about how you learn- are you someone that likes to be taught in person? maybe a tutor or in person course is right for you. Do you find watching videos helps you learn? You could try an online course. Are you a reader? Maybe just get the prep books and self study. There is no right or wrong way to study for the LSAT- you just want to study in a way that suits your learning style. 

 

As for getting involved and volunteering i wholeheartedly recommend it, as long as it isn't to the detriment of your grades. Volunteering and extracurriculars isn't going to get you into law school, but you are right that it will give you something to write about in your PS, and can be helpful for scholarships. In 3rd year sign up for a couple things and see what clicks with you. Its way better to dedicate yourself to one or two things that you are really passionate about then it is to be tangentially involved in a ton of stuff. In my time I joined a couple student societies, started one for my major, joined 2 volunteer groups where I took on exec roles and volunteered my time outside of school (of course not all at once). In my PS i had no where near the space to write about all the things that I had been involved in, so I focused on one or two things that I was the most passionate and involved in and created a way better personal statement than I would have if I were just trying to shoehorn in brags about having been involved in all kinds of stuff. Just dedicate yourself to causes that you genuinely care about and you will be all the better for it (plus its FUN and a great way to get your mind off of just school). I'd be happy to give you some recommendations of organizations that I enjoyed working with that might also be operating in your area :)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...