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Law School vs MBA

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11 minutes ago, lawstudent20202020 said:

dropping a client as a lawyer is not done lightly, law society's have very specific rules on how and when it can be done, and even then if its a big client that is ending over a bad relationship, there's a good chance they turn around and take a run at you. You have obligations to client's that you cannot step away from, no matter how much of a annoyance they are. Plus if you are a junior lawyer, which is were we all start, and its a partner's client, you never get to make that decision and your feelings on the matter probably won't be taken into account.

I get being a junior that it's not your call to make and that sometimes emergencies happen and you're needed on short notice, but if this happens all the time with this 1 client you have there has be a line at some point doesn't there?

Also i'm curious what rules does the law society have against dropping clients? isn't the law a free a market and you can choose to serve whoever you wish (so long as your decision is not motivated by sexism/racism/xenophobia...etc)?

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3 minutes ago, How2LawSchoolCanada said:

I get being a junior that it's not your call to make and that sometimes emergencies happen and you're needed on short notice, but if this happens all the time with this 1 client you have there has be a line at some point doesn't there?

Also i'm curious what rules does the law society have against dropping clients? isn't the law a free a market and you can choose to serve whoever you wish (so long as your decision is not motivated by sexism/racism/xenophobia...etc)?

1. If they pay the bills, no.

2. You'll learn these when you become a lawyer.

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You guys, please listen to the actual lawyers answering from personal experience NOT the people who haven’t spent a single day as a lawyer pretending they know wtf they are talking about. 

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@How2LawSchoolCanada In no way am I trying to imply that you can't handle the demands of being a lawyer - but I think it's important to dismantle some of your assumptions so you can make an informed decision (and I hope other prospective law students on this forum can also benefit from the info). 

  1.  Lawyers have fiduciary obligations to their clients - this means we have a legal obligation to act in their best interest. If you're genuinely interested, you can give a quick skim on LSO re Rules of Professional Conduct. There are certain circumstances that lawyers can "fire" their clients - but it's not done lightly and definitely not because "you always ask me to give you deliverables under short notice" - clients need what they need when they need it - sometimes you can push back and sometimes you can't.   
  2. Lawyers can accept contingency fee arrangements  under certain circumstances too. The legal profession is also coming up with alternative fee arrangements rather than just sticking to the billable rate model. For some lawyers, money make is not guaranteed. Also, don't assume clients always pay for the work you did. Like any other business, firms have AR and have to write it off sometimes (doesn't affect my salary as an associate but does affect the firm's overall bottom line). 
  3. If you work at a Bay St. firm, you assume your firm is already charging a "Brinks truck worth of Benjamin's" to the client. From what I know, the Bay street firms' general process of selecting/accepting clients are (1) can they pay the bills, (2) are there any conflicts where the firm cannot act for them and periodically (3) if it's not certain they can do (1), is this what we consider a "strategic" client where the firm is willing to structure AFAs. 

On a side note, you seem to really dislike finance and the risks/uncertainties related to that field of work. You mentioned you're interested in logistics and marketing as well - perhaps getting an MBA as a tool to switch from finance to logistics or marketing would be a good option for you to consider as well. 

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18 hours ago, How2LawSchoolCanada said:

isn't the law a free a market and you can choose to serve whoever you wish (so long as your decision is not motivated by sexism/racism/xenophobia...etc)?

It's a regulated market. As mentioned above, you would be bound by the governing legislation and the law society's regulations/rules of professional conduct. Licensees can be disciplined by the law society for non-compliance with the rules. 

18 hours ago, How2LawSchoolCanada said:

Also i'm curious what rules does the law society have against dropping clients? 

Among others, the rules state that a lawyer shall not withdraw from representation of a client except for good cause and on reasonable notice to the client. There are specific provisions, but one you're retained, withdrawing for inconvenience and being needed on short notice are not likely to satisfy the good cause or reasonable notice requirements.* Your image of legal practice doesn't accord with my still limited experience. Managing client expectations and dealing with unreasonable demands are just part of private practice.

*Epeeist-style disclaimer: none of this should be construed as legal advice, etc, etc.

Edited by realpseudonym

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