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hopefulbutscared

Should I bother applying for Law School?

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Hi everyone, 

So, my grades throughout first year and this semester (I'm a second year student now, going into second semester) have not been great. Right now, I am a political science student but I decided to switch my program to Labour Studies/Relations because if I don't get into law school, I really want something else that I can be fulfilled with (either full switch or switch to a combined PS/LS). My plan from there is to do a Masters in Management or HR Management and start a career in employment relations. My plan for law school (if you can see where I'm going with this) is to focus on labour law, if I were to ever get in.

My confidence is really low at this point and my mental health is just all over the place. Considering I'm switching programs, taking 3 first year courses next semester to do so, and most likely have to do a fifth year or extra semester of university, it looks like all those factors would put me at a disadvantage compared to someone who did 4 years with excellent grades and great references/curriculars. On another note, I know as a university student I should be focused on myself, but its hard as a political science student to see so many people who want to go to law school and actually have a better chance than you to do so. 

So, since this forum is filled with people who have been to law school, are law school students, or got accepted over the last year, do you think it's even worth it, in 2022 or 23, for me to go through the application process? Is there any way of redeeming myself? I really want a career in this, but of course, law school is not easy to get into (neither is a Masters but arguably, it is easier compared to law+ med). Has anyone actually ever seen someone in my position get accepted to a law school (a friend, family member etc). And if anyone on here has been through something similar, feel free to PM me. 

Edited by hopefulbutscared
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Some schools only look at your best two years or your last two years. It doesn’t seem like you’ve done a whole lot of research or have even read through this forum.

Get better grades, see what you get on the LSAT, and evaluate your chances in the future. 

Also - relax. Do your best going forward and be as responsible as possible, but relax. 

Edited by BringBackCrunchBerries
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5 minutes ago, BringBackCrunchBerries said:

Some schools only look at your best two years or your last two years. It doesn’t seem like you’ve done a whole lot of research or have even read through this forum.

Get better grades, see what you get on the LSAT, and evaluate your chances in the future. 

Also - relax. Do your best going forward and be as responsible as possible, but relax. 

Yes, I know about best two and such, but does it matter a whole lot if your extra curriculars are not the greatest either? So far, I don't really have any, and I haven't really made any real connections here to have a professor or someone worth a reference. How would I go about that? 

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8 minutes ago, hopefulbutscared said:

Yes, I know about best two and such, but does it matter a whole lot if your extra curriculars are not the greatest either? So far, I don't really have any, and I haven't really made any real connections here to have a professor or someone worth a reference. How would I go about that? 

ECs are basically irrelevant at most schools. They might help if they're exceptional, but 95% of the time they're not. 

References are not hard to get. Go to office hours, talk a lot in class, and get a good grade. That's all there is to it. Your reference letter doesn't need to blow anyone away. You just have to have them.

I'd recommend doing a trial LSAT run (under the precise conditions of the test, there are lots of resources available that will tell you how to do that). If you get a 160+, that's a good sign. If you get a lot lower, you'll at least know you have your work cut out for you.

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2 hours ago, hopefulbutscared said:

Yes, I know about best two and such, but does it matter a whole lot if your extra curriculars are not the greatest either? So far, I don't really have any, and I haven't really made any real connections here to have a professor or someone worth a reference. How would I go about that? 

I have basically 0 EC’s and didn’t get any references and I got into my top 3 schools this cycle. I also have taken 5 years for my BA. 

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1 hour ago, PlatoandSocrates said:

I have basically 0 EC’s and didn’t get any references and I got into my top 3 schools this cycle. I also have taken 5 years for my BA. 

Did you ever take summer school as well? That's something I'm looking into so I can fulfill the credits faster since I decided to transfer. I know different law schools have different policies on that as well.

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I switched programs in term two of second year after a very rough start to undergrad. I took summer courses on two seperate occasions, I had next to no EC's and also dealt with a lot of mental hangups in line with the "I'm not good enough" position you seem to be suffering from.

Got into my first and second choice schools already. (UBC and UWO)

There are lots of schools where the things you've listed won't damage your chances in any significant way as long as you turn things around. And keep in mind that a lot of your peers talk themselves and their chances of getting in up, so don't be intimidated by words coming from someone that could easily be lying to themselves and by extension you. You seem to know what you need to correct to have a good shot, so I'd say you're in a pretty good position even if it doesn't feel that way. 

Feel free to pm me!

Edited by Hydarnes
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38 minutes ago, hopefulbutscared said:

Did you ever take summer school as well? That's something I'm looking into so I can fulfill the credits faster since I decided to transfer. I know different law schools have different policies on that as well.

Yes I took 5 summer classes over 2 different summers. I think every school I’ve gotten into (UBC, UVic, and UofA) do factor those in. 

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This is a premature question. You are 1.5 years into undergrad, have not given any information regarding your stats, have not taken the LSAT, and are asking if you should bother applying for law school?

No one here is a fortune teller. Come back with a 2 years GPA and LSAT score and people can better help assess your chances. 

On a side note, most of the people around you claiming that they will go to law, medicine, dentistry, etc. will not get in in Canada. Stop focusing on the people around you because everyone has their own individual hustle. They are focusing on their own lives and goals; you should do the same.

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I don't know exactly what you mean when you say that your grades haven't been "great" (i.e. are we talking about mostly B's or mostly C's?), so it's hard to tell the impact that they will have on your chances. But as others have said, there is still time to improve your grades and some schools only consider your last two years. 

Getting references (at least in my experience) became easier in later years, when there were generally smaller class sizes, seminar-type courses, and the opportunity to take more than one course with any given professor. 

Also, like others, I did not find that my extra-curriculars had too much of an impact on my applications. I worked throughout undergrad, but only had two or three extra-curriculars - I got in everywhere I applied, except UofT (it was a long-shot). Try to get involved in extra-curriculars that genuinely interest you or that have some value to you (other than padding your law school applications).

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Maybe you can take some comfort in knowing you're not alone.

I, like you, switched programs (engineering to psychology). I was a transfer student who ended up graduating with distinction from the University of Guelph, but my transcript from Alberta (where I did my first two years) is littered with Ws, Cs and a D in physics (f*** waves and optics, for what it's worth). The lesson here: It's not too late for you to turn things around. Yes, schools like Dalhousie will look at your L2/B2. There's that to be thankful for. But you're by no means out of the running at a lot of cGPA schools if you can make some positive changes. 

I, like you, had to deal with my mental health. The only advice I can offer on that front is that you have to decide whether or not school is the right place for you to be right now. I can't stress this enough. Your education is going to set the foundation for the rest of your life, and you need to be able to make it a priority. I realized I couldn't at the time, so I had to take 5 semesters away from my studies to get my mind right -- which means, for those of you counting, that I took 6.5 years to complete my undergrad. Who cares if you graduate a little later, that's no reason to feel anything but pride in your accomplishments.

For the record, I've been accepted at Dalhousie and UVic so far. A rocky start isn't the end of the world; don't sell yourself short.

Feel free to PM me, I'm obsessed with checking this site every few hours :S

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OP,  take a deep breath, take a step back. 

Look, you're still super young, assuming you went to university right out of high school and you finished high school on time etc. And even if you're not, it's not the end of the world if you don't jump right into law school from undergrad. And whoever is feeding you that line is full of it. 

Without knowing what your current GPA is, I offer the following advice if law school is your ultimate goal ...take courses you are good at! Take courses you enjoy! And for the love of gawd take courses you will do well in!

That's alone will be one of the biggest differences between people who will have a straight path to law school and people like me, who struggled majorly. Because I decided mid-undergrad that I needed a fail-safe if law didn't pan out and took some hardcore STEM courses on a way to a double major that might as well have been earned by two different people.

To this day there is a 10% difference between my grades for one major versus the other, and it made getting into law school a hell of a lot harder than it otherwise needed to be. 

So, don't worry about the things you can't control, just focus on doing as well as you possibly can in courses you enjoy. Sitting pretty with 80's on your transcript makes a lot of problems go away.

 

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On 12/16/2019 at 8:57 AM, Deadpool said:

This is a premature question. You are 1.5 years into undergrad, have not given any information regarding your stats, have not taken the LSAT, and are asking if you should bother applying for law school?

No one here is a fortune teller. Come back with a 2 years GPA and LSAT score and people can better help assess your chances. 

On a side note, most of the people around you claiming that they will go to law, medicine, dentistry, etc. will not get in in Canada. Stop focusing on the people around you because everyone has their own individual hustle. They are focusing on their own lives and goals; you should do the same.

I, for sure, will come back eventually and share my stats once I'm done next semester. As for the LSAT, I have tried numerous times to take the tests myself but can't really get past them. I'm not that experienced in logic or anything like that, so that probably shouldn't come as a surprise. My school holds free prep so I'll definitely figure out in my second half of undergrad, which in all honesty is coming by quick, how to improve

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