Jump to content
Skooled

Mental Breakdown

Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, OnlyResident said:

If you're actually having a mental breakdown you need to seek help. Otherwise, just calm down. UofT or Oz aren't the end all be all. They reject people with perfect grades and high LSATs every year. Your grades are only a third of your application. All Canadian law schools are reputable and you're coming off kind of naive talking about "top law schools". Why only uoft and oz? If you can't see that an 83% isn't good enough for atleast Oz, it just shows that you haven't done your research. Uoft is a different story but you still have time to raise your average to be at their median. 

Oh, really? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So one of the biggest reality checks I ever got was when I went from high school to undergrad. I was a brilliant student and I identified as a brilliant student and in my peer group I was the “smart one” and my exhausted single parent never had to worry about me because I was always just so good at being good. 

And in my first year I absolutely shit the bed. Like several C and C- grades, papers coming back with red ink all over them, and my sense of worth and identity went *poof*. It was tough. Really tough. If I wasn’t the smart one, then who the fuck was I? My future plans went from being Something Really Impressive to being, you know, maybe the barista that everyone really likes who always has their first novel on the go down at the corner coffee shop. At 18 I was ready to mail it in and give up and just accept that I wasn’t going to make anything of myself ever and my life was over.

This is a very common experience. It’s part of the transition between being a Young Adult to being just a regular adult. You learn you aren’t the greatest, you learn you aren’t that special, you learn that natural talent really cannot beat hard work and good habits. You figure it out.

I figured it out, began studying smarter, worked harder, planned the next five years out, and managed to stay in University. I went from C’s to A’s. I got into law school. It was fine. But it was hard.

I say all this so that it won’t sound patronizing when I point out that some of this is probably just the agonizing and awful process of growing up. We don’t talk a lot about these private struggles, especially among us overachievers, because they come across as weird and almost self indulgent. But it’s real. 

So chin up, and keep going. It’s going to be fine. Give yourself a break, plan what you can, work at what you can, and let the rest go. As the woman said, your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, QuincyWagstaff said:

My advice is that you should write a strictly timed LSAT.

You’ve asked what to focus on to increase your chances of getting accepted to these schools as much as possible. A very high LSAT will improve your chances more than anything else could. 
 

You’re concerned that you’re simply not intelligent enough for law school. Well, after you write the LSAT, I can guarantee you’ll have a much more realistic idea of how intelligent (or, unintelligent) you are.
 

You’ve also asked what others have done to gain acceptance to law school. I achieved a  very high LSAT score. That was essentially the end of the story; I was able to get accepted anywhere I wanted, from Columbia through Toronto. 
 

I believe you also asked some other things, but I can’t be bothered to go back and try a second time to decipher that block of text you posted. 

Thanks for the feedback. Do you recommend any books or other resources to best prepare me for the LSAT? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hegdis said:

So one of the biggest reality checks I ever got was when I went from high school to undergrad. I was a brilliant student and I identified as a brilliant student and in my peer group I was the “smart one” and my exhausted single parent never had to worry about me because I was always just so good at being good. 

And in my first year I absolutely shit the bed. Like several C and C- grades, papers coming back with red ink all over them, and my sense of worth and identity went *poof*. It was tough. Really tough. If I wasn’t the smart one, then who the fuck was I? My future plans went from being Something Really Impressive to being, you know, maybe the barista that everyone really likes who always has their first novel on the go down at the corner coffee shop. At 18 I was ready to mail it in and give up and just accept that I wasn’t going to make anything of myself ever and my life was over.

This is a very common experience. It’s part of the transition between being a Young Adult to being just a regular adult. You learn you aren’t the greatest, you learn you aren’t that special, you learn that natural talent really cannot beat hard work and good habits. You figure it out.

I figured it out, began studying smarter, worked harder, planned the next five years out, and managed to stay in University. I went from C’s to A’s. I got into law school. It was fine. But it was hard.

I say all this so that it won’t sound patronizing when I point out that some of this is probably just the agonizing and awful process of growing up. We don’t talk a lot about these private struggles, especially among us overachievers, because they come across as weird and almost self indulgent. But it’s real. 

So chin up, and keep going. It’s going to be fine. Give yourself a break, plan what you can, work at what you can, and let the rest go. As the woman said, your choices are half chance. So are everybody else’s.

Wow. Thank you. Much appreciated 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Tagger said:

If you're actually having a mental breakdown, I encourage you to see a therapist or similarly qualified professional who can help you work through those issues. 

If you're freaking out because you received a 75 on one paper, chin up. No one can provide any guarantees until you take the LSAT, but you can get into UofT and Osgoode with an 83%. 

I shouldn’t have used mental breakdown as it is just a freak out for now. But thanks for the feedback. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, andi28 said:

I agree with Tagger and OnlyResident; if you’re truly having a mental breakdown, you should seek help. Taking care of your mental health is as important as taking care of your physical health.

You also need to remember that UofT and Oz are not the only two good schools. And even if you want to ultimately practice in Toronto, there are a lot of other schools that participate in the Toronto recruit/place students in Toronto.
 

Your GPA is also very good and if you keep it up and get a good LSAT score, you’ll have a lot of schools to choose from. And if you’re dead set on UofT, the personal statement is given 1/3 of the weight, they take B3 and reward upward trends. You’re only in second year. That means you probably only have a year’s worth of grades. First, focus on doing well on your December exams. Then try to keep it up for the next 2.5 years. Your 83% might not even matter in the end. 

I got 60s, 70s a few times in undergrad and even had a 3.1 GPA one semester. And it wasn’t the end the world. I brought my marks up, got a solid LSAT and got an offer from every school I applied to. I’m not saying that this happens to everybody but just know that one bad semester, or even one bad year is not a big deal. 
And your grades are great!

 

Thank you for sharing and for the encouragement !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

10 hours ago, LawSchoolJock said:

If being 'school smart' is the only thing you have in your life than you have bigger problems imho.

I want to echo what LawSchoolJock and others have said. The most concerning thing to me about your post is that you say the only stable thing in your life is being good at school. I think one of the things you should be working on while in undergrad is also your sense of worth, and finding happiness and stability outside of school. If you can afford therapy, that could be a good place to start.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, OnlyResident said:

They reject people with perfect grades and high LSATs every year. 

Just to clarify for anxious applicants, I have never seen this happen in the (too) many years I've been participating here. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, erinl2 said:

Just to clarify for anxious applicants, I have never seen this happen in the (too) many years I've been participating here. 

Difficult to ascertain what they mean by perfect grades and high LSATs, but some applicants have reported being rejected with 3.9+ Best 3 and mid-high 160s in the past - at least in the U of T Rejected threads from previous cycles. However, these appear to be anomalies and not the norm. I know a few of these people ended up coming to Osgoode.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Skooled said:

Hello everyone. I really really need some advice. I need to get into UofT’s or Osgoode’s law school. It has been a dream of mine since I was in elementary. I was a smart student throughout secondary and got into all my undergrad choices (Western, Mcgill, McMaster). I ended up having to stay local, so I’m currently at Windsor. I thought I would excel since Windsor is considered “easy”. However, I’m in second year and my average is around 83%? I’m trying to increase it substantially this year but it’s been a struggle. I know an 85 won’t cut it if I want to be competitive. I have personal factors that play in that suppress my motivation. I just got a paper back and got a 75. Horrible. It just hit me what if I’m not smart enough to get into Canada’s top law schools or any law schools for that matter. Since I am in second year, I am hoping I still have time to become better? So my question is, what should I prioritize in order to have my chances of getting into Osgoode or UofT as high as possible? I can’t imagine not being able to have a choice in what law school I want to attend in Canada. I want to excel, I have to, it’s all I got. Being “school smart” is the only thing that’s been stable in my life and all of a sudden I’m dumb? I’m so frustrated but I’ll be even more frustrated if my marks do not change for the better. What did you do that got you in to Osgoode, UofT or other “top” Canadian law schools? What should I be doing atm and for the next two years to make it almost certain that I will have a good chance of being accepted? I appreciate your time reading this. Any experiences, thoughts, opinions, and facts on getting into top law schools in Canada would be appreciated. I want to fulfill my dream.

First of all, I get how you feel and I think a lot of people have these moments of doubt- but you need to believe in yourself, know you have time to perfect your application and be proud of what you've accomplished so far! I find that the best thing that helps me stay focused and feel better is writing a list of how I will get to my goal. Your average is really good right now but you have second and third year to improve it. Putting aside time to focus on the LSAT and scoring high on that is the best way to increase your chances of getting into UofT. But, also don't forget your soft factors! I've heard of people with high stats getting rejected from these schools because they didn't really try for their PS. So around third or fourth year begin thinking about what you want to write about - and make sure to get it edited by a prof or your school's writing centre. Also focus on your mental well-being; because out of everything I've said its the most important! Grades or LSAT scores - at the end of the day, don't define your intelligence or your value as a human being. ☺️

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, erinl2 said:

Just to clarify for anxious applicants, I have never seen this happen in the (too) many years I've been participating here. 

You'd have to assume that person would post on this forum lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Skooled said:

Being “school smart” is the only thing that’s been stable in my life and all of a sudden I’m dumb? 

I feel like this is going to echo Hegdis' post, but I'll still post it anyways...

All throughout grade school and high school I was labelled as smart or gifted.  I went to the special gifted program in a different school.  I skipped a year.  I got straight As without studying, and when the gifted program was over my parents enrolled me in a more rigorous private school.

First year university was still pretty easy, as it largely went over material from high school.  But once I hit second year I hit a wall.  I did not have good study habits and did not have a good work ethic - it always just came naturally to me.  But now I was pulling in some Cs, and even a D in one course.  It was a shock and blow to my self-esteem.  I had always intended to go to law school, but now doubted that I would be able to.

The transition from high school to university is a hard one, even if you have been successful in school before.  You do have to learn new study habits, you have to internalize more discipline on yourself.  You still have lots of time to improve your overall marks and build up those habits.

I didn't have any sudden epiphany, but after second year I studied more often, was more rigorous in my readings.  I was locked into my program, but where I had electives I started taking subjects I was interested in, even if not related to my program.  My marks did  bounce back, although never to the straight As I was once used to.

So what do you need to do?  Focus on your studies.  Recognize that an 83% average is still pretty good (higher than I got in second year).  Don't worry about what marks other people get - just focus on doing the best job you can do.

And don't worry about whether you get into a "top" law school or not.  If you're from Windsor there's nothing wrong with going to law school at Windsor, even if it isn't considered a "top" school by some.  It's law degree is just as good as any other Canadian law school's.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Hegdis said:

 

This is a very common experience. It’s part of the transition between being a Young Adult to being just a regular adult. You learn you aren’t the greatest, you learn you aren’t that special, you learn that natural talent really cannot beat hard work and good habits. You figure it out.

 

i think you are special....

 

...smart too.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're too early into your degree to be worrying so much ❤️ Take some deep breaths and just keep working away at it. Most people do not have a flawless transcript and you should try not to measure your self worth based on your grades. They are separate from who you are as a person. Also, pretty much all Canadian law schools are "top tier" so keep that in mind.  Undergrad is a stressful time but try to slow down and enjoy what you are studying instead of being hyper-focused on the grades. Generally, the high marks come with enjoying what you are studying. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/5/2019 at 10:04 AM, accesstojustice said:

First of all, I get how you feel and I think a lot of people have these moments of doubt- but you need to believe in yourself, know you have time to perfect your application and be proud of what you've accomplished so far! I find that the best thing that helps me stay focused and feel better is writing a list of how I will get to my goal. Your average is really good right now but you have second and third year to improve it. Putting aside time to focus on the LSAT and scoring high on that is the best way to increase your chances of getting into UofT. But, also don't forget your soft factors! I've heard of people with high stats getting rejected from these schools because they didn't really try for their PS. So around third or fourth year begin thinking about what you want to write about - and make sure to get it edited by a prof or your school's writing centre. Also focus on your mental well-being; because out of everything I've said its the most important! Grades or LSAT scores - at the end of the day, don't define your intelligence or your value as a human being. ☺️

Thanks so much. Feeling less freaked out after reading this + other posts on here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Allicat said:

You're too early into your degree to be worrying so much ❤️ Take some deep breaths and just keep working away at it. Most people do not have a flawless transcript and you should try not to measure your self worth based on your grades. They are separate from who you are as a person. Also, pretty much all Canadian law schools are "top tier" so keep that in mind.  Undergrad is a stressful time but try to slow down and enjoy what you are studying instead of being hyper-focused on the grades. Generally, the high marks come with enjoying what you are studying. 

Thank you! I'll try to remember these things.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/5/2019 at 3:40 PM, Malicious Prosecutor said:

I feel like this is going to echo Hegdis' post, but I'll still post it anyways...

All throughout grade school and high school I was labelled as smart or gifted.  I went to the special gifted program in a different school.  I skipped a year.  I got straight As without studying, and when the gifted program was over my parents enrolled me in a more rigorous private school.

First year university was still pretty easy, as it largely went over material from high school.  But once I hit second year I hit a wall.  I did not have good study habits and did not have a good work ethic - it always just came naturally to me.  But now I was pulling in some Cs, and even a D in one course.  It was a shock and blow to my self-esteem.  I had always intended to go to law school, but now doubted that I would be able to.

The transition from high school to university is a hard one, even if you have been successful in school before.  You do have to learn new study habits, you have to internalize more discipline on yourself.  You still have lots of time to improve your overall marks and build up those habits.

I didn't have any sudden epiphany, but after second year I studied more often, was more rigorous in my readings.  I was locked into my program, but where I had electives I started taking subjects I was interested in, even if not related to my program.  My marks did  bounce back, although never to the straight As I was once used to.

So what do you need to do?  Focus on your studies.  Recognize that an 83% average is still pretty good (higher than I got in second year).  Don't worry about what marks other people get - just focus on doing the best job you can do.

And don't worry about whether you get into a "top" law school or not.  If you're from Windsor there's nothing wrong with going to law school at Windsor, even if it isn't considered a "top" school by some.  It's law degree is just as good as any other Canadian law school's.

Thanks for understanding and for the advice, appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


  • Recent Posts

    • If they do, that's an anomaly.  Full course load is five per semester, that's the norm. Each university sets their own policy for full-time status and it varies. Queen's may be more accepting than other schools of four course semesters but, technically, that isn't the standard  definition at Canadian schools for undergrad of a full course load. 
    • I do believe that Queen's considers 4 courses per semester a full course load.
    • I don't see a lot of UofC Associates or Articling Students in Toronto at all, but there's certainly Windsor grads at every large firm. I also wouldn't place my hopes on getting into Big Law in Calgary and then lateraling over either - that's a lot of steps that have to go correctly. Getting Calgary BigLaw isn't a lay-up in and of itself. I would say go to Windsor and network, get good summaries and work your butt off in 1L and try to get grades in the top quarter of your class. 
    • Bit of an odd-duck here.    B2: 78% LSAT: 157 (one write) Sask Connection: Step-father is ex-law lecturer at UofS and Queen’s Bench and I served as president of the University of Regina Student’ Union for two elected terms.    Will these connection items help??
    • hey thanks! this is a good perspective. yeah I am open to biglaw in Vancouver, Calgary and Toronto, but ideally would like to end up in Toronto. I know about Windsor having low placement rates, so I guess my question is whether to risk the low placement rate but be in Ontario, or risk being out of province but have the Calgary market open to me. I don't really want to stay in Calgary longer than I have to.

×
×
  • Create New...