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noredeisgnr

Fate of my volunteering career

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9 minutes ago, Disputes said:

What is a water boy. And what would you classify as "working in depth on PI cases" without being a lawyer or paralegal 

I suppose 'depth' was not the best word to use here, as it seems to be giving off a particular idea that is not what I intended to represent. 

What I mean by 'depth';

Is to be working on a PI case from beginning to end, in which I may understand the inner workings well enough so that I can act in a proactive fashion and provide input that may aid in efficiency and best-possible outcome of the case, all the whilst taking into account the constraints of my legality as a volunteer. 

To contrast this, I at the moment undertake the mentioned tasks within the original post at the discretion of my superior (a lawyer). 

'In depth' refers to being able to undertake the tasks mentioned above and all those similarly administrative that I have not yet learned to complete, but at my own discretion via nature of being well versed enough to no longer require awaiting my superiors instructions.

 

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My 2 cents (think about how much what that will get you!):

1. You need good grades and LSAT scores to get into law school (already mentioned in chat)

2. No amount of volunteering will get you into law school if you are not in the ballpark (already mentioned)

3. Volunteering helps with borderline applications (go back and read #1 and #2) 

4. Volunteering with a law firm is no more beneficial than volunteering with an NGO (and could be worse), despite "experience in law"

5. The only real benefit of your job (yes, it is a job) is exposing you to elements of PI to a small degree so that you can see if you like it. Do you like it?

Don't go spending all of this in one place

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OP, what is your GPA? Seeing as how you are currently in 3rd year of undergrad, you must be completing your undergraduate degree soon. We may provide more prudent and beneficial advice on this front. 

Have you done an LSAT diagnostic and started studying for the test?

Your volunteering position sounds like a job to me. I know people out of high school currently employed at law firms doing exactly the kind of work you are doing. You are placing far too much importance on it. You can do better. You sound like a  go-getter and are motivated to do better, so focus your energy elsewhere. 

Edit: I think people are being a bit too harsh on an undergraduate student here. There is no need for a pile on. This person came here for help and advice, so let's try to be constructive and guide them in the right direction.

Edited by Deadpool
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6 minutes ago, noredeisgnr said:

'In depth' refers to being able to undertake the tasks mentioned above and all those similarly administrative that I have not yet learned to complete, but at my own discretion via nature of being well versed enough to no longer require awaiting my superiors instructions.

So, once you've completed law school, passed the bar exams, finished articling, have been called in your jurisdiction, and have a few years of experience under your belt, then.

Edited by BertyBewp
It's Monday. Experience v expertise.
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6 minutes ago, noredeisgnr said:

What I mean by 'depth';

Is to be working on a PI case from beginning to end, in which I may understand the inner workings well enough so that I can act in a proactive fashion and provide input that may aid in efficiency and best-possible outcome of the case, all the whilst taking into account the constraints of my legality as a volunteer. 

 

 

6 minutes ago, noredeisgnr said:

'In depth' refers to being able to undertake the tasks mentioned above and all those similarly administrative that I have not yet learned to complete, but at my own discretion via nature of being well versed enough to no longer require awaiting my superiors instructions.

 

Lmfao ok. So what I get from this is that you want to work on a PI case from beginning to end, and that you want to be able to  understand it so well that you provide advice in respect of its outcome (so legal advice, right) and to complete administrative tasks at your own discretion without getting the go-ahead from your supervisor.

All without going to law school and finishing articling,  am I correct? 

 

 

Edited by Disputes
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1 minute ago, Disputes said:

 

Lmfao ok. So what I get from this is that you want to work on a PI case from beginning to end, and that you want to be able to  understand it so well that you provide advice in respect of its outcome (so legal advice, right) and to complete administrative tasks at your own discretion without getting the go-ahead from your supervisor.

All without going to law school and finishing articling,  am I correct? 

 

 

Not legal advice, administrative.  

I can not make it any more clearer that I am not interested in the legal aspects other from an educational perspective.

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2 minutes ago, Deadpool said:

OP, what is your GPA? Seeing as how you are currently in 3rd year of undergrad, you must be completing your undergraduate degree soon. We may provide more prudent and beneficial advice on this front. 

Have you done an LSAT diagnostic and started studying for the test?

Your volunteering position sounds like a job to me. I know people out of high school currently employed at law firms doing exactly the kind of work you are doing. You are placing far too much importance on it. You can do better. You sound like a  go-getter and are motivated to do better, so focus your energy elsewhere. 

This has been the overwhelming consensus of replies. 

I was under a false impression prior to making this thread. The replies have prompted me to re-evaluate my current perceptions and choices. 

This comment has pretty well summarized it, I will be requesting this thread to be closed.

 

Thank you everyone for your input. I took something away from this post, something I did not know; precisely what I was looking for. 

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6 minutes ago, noredeisgnr said:

Not legal advice, administrative.  

I can not make it any more clearer that I am not interested in the legal aspects other from an educational perspective.

What is "administrative advice"? Also, performing administrative tasks does not really seem in line with your description above of providing proactive input based on a deep knowledge of PI law. And if you really mean simply administrative tasks, how can you really expect to perform such tasks without getting instructions from your supervisor? 

Administrative tasks are delegated by the people with the deep knowledge of PI law. Why would someone with such a deep knowledge of it want to perform such tasks?

Edited by Disputes
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8 minutes ago, noredeisgnr said:

This has been the overwhelming consensus of replies. 

I was under a false impression prior to making this thread. The replies have prompted me to re-evaluate my current perceptions and choices. 

This comment has pretty well summarized it, I will be requesting this thread to be closed.

 

Thank you everyone for your input. I took something away from this post, something I did not know; precisely what I was looking for. 

On top of everything else that has been mentioned, if you want to have an "in" at the firm once you start law school and are seeking a summer student position, it may be worth keeping. I know someone who volunteered (maybe got paid minumum wage?) with a Bay Street firm from first year undergrad and went in later as a summer student. However, you mentioned that you are not interested in PI or this particular firm in the long run, so it may not be of much help to you. 

I applaud you for trying to gain experience and seeing if law is the right fit for you. Don't worry about some of the negativity you received here. Just stay focused on your goals and something will come out of it. Law schools in addition to GPA and LSAT score look for personal achievements that are unique and can speak to you as an individual. Working at a law firm is not important to law schools because it does not tell them much about who you are. They want to know you, and what you can bring to their class that others cannot. So find a way to sell yourself there. Good luck. 

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12 minutes ago, Disputes said:

What is "administrative advice"? Also, performing administrative tasks does not really seem in line with your description above of providing proactive input based on a deep knowledge of PI law. And if you really mean simply administrative tasks, how can you really expect to perform such tasks without getting instructions from your supervisor? 

Administrative tasks are delegated by the people with the deep knowledge of PI law. Why would someone with such a deep knowledge of it want to perform such tasks?

 

You are right, and I have conflated the two, administrative and legal into something more simpler than it actually is. 

I find myself questioning some of my prior presumptions. I will heed your criticism.

 

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