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26 minutes ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

I may be wrong, but I don't think there are any non-verein international firms with full offices in Canada (or Toronto, at least). 

Not full offices, no. Not to my knowledge.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, pzabbythesecond said:

Not full offices, no. Not to my knowledge.

Skadden has an office in TO. Not a "full" office as you indicate. There are some others too. But I can't think of a full service NYC-based firm or Chicago-based firm that has 20+ lawyers in Toronto. Littler has an office in TO serving the firms institutional clients in Canada among others presumably. 

Edited by pineapple21

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6 hours ago, BlockedQuebecois said:

NRF, DLA Piper, and Back McKenzie are all structured as vereins, so it's far from clear that transfers between offices are common. Additionally, the verein structure means that international connections are less likely to be useful, since the verein structure generally requires the local firm to handle any matters in the local market. 

So if Rio Tinto uses DLA Piper as it's Australian counsel and needs help with legal problems surrounding its Saskatchewan potash operations, that work is likely to flow to DLA Piper regardless of any internal connection with a former Australian lawyer working in the Canadian DLA Piper office. In contrast, if Rio Tinto uses Clayton Utz as its Australian counsel, it's conceivable that Clayton Utz could recommend Rio Tinto use a former Clayton Utz partner who moved to Blakes as their counsel in Canada. 

The above is a vast oversimplification, but it demonstrates why the above path isn't likely to be the best idea. There are, of course, other benefits to practicing at one of those firms – name recognition being chief among them. But you'd likely get just as much milage out of working at one of the Big Six, or one of the "global elite" firms working in the region as well. 

Good points. I'm trying to hypothesize how a Canadian could go to Australia and optimize their experience and education. I'd imagine tax and corporate are the best avenues for one who wants to start a legal career in Aus. 

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5 hours ago, pineapple21 said:

Good points. I'm trying to hypothesize how a Canadian could go to Australia and optimize their experience and education. I'd imagine tax and corporate are the best avenues for one who wants to start a legal career in Aus. 

Tax, one of the more specialized areas, would make no sense. How would an expert in Australia’s tax law use that knowledge in Canada? 

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3 hours ago, easttowest said:

Tax, one of the more specialized areas, would make no sense. How would an expert in Australia’s tax law use that knowledge in Canada? 

That's a question for an international tax lawyer, not me. There's always a demand for lawyers with cross border tax law knowledge, among both companies and individuals.  

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18 hours ago, pineapple21 said:

That's a question for an international tax lawyer, not me. There's always a demand for lawyers with cross border tax law knowledge, among both companies and individuals.  

Maybe questions about the Canadian legal market should also be for Canadian lawyers or at least law students, not you. 

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4 hours ago, Mal said:

Maybe questions about the Canadian legal market should also be for Canadian lawyers or at least law students, not you. 

Yikes, what's your problem? I practice in a foreign country and see a lot of ways how I could leverage my education, connections and experience from abroad for a legal career in Canada, if that were the aim. I think these opportunities are far greater for tax and corporate than litigation or other practices, which is why I highlighted them. 

There's a demand for international tax structuring and planning services on the corporate and individual level. Do you not agree? A student who studies at Bond, leverages her connections and education to develop an international practice there, makes the necessary Canadian business and professional connections, and returns to Canada with a cross border or international tax practice will have optimized her time abroad, IMO. That's the point. It's an example. 

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6 hours ago, pineapple21 said:

Yikes, what's your problem? I practice in a foreign country and see a lot of ways how I could leverage my education, connections and experience from abroad for a legal career in Canada, if that were the aim. I think these opportunities are far greater for tax and corporate than litigation or other practices, which is why I highlighted them. 

There's a demand for international tax structuring and planning services on the corporate and individual level. Do you not agree? A student who studies at Bond, leverages her connections and education to develop an international practice there, makes the necessary Canadian business and professional connections, and returns to Canada with a cross border or international tax practice will have optimized her time abroad, IMO. That's the point. It's an example. 

This is the problem, you gave bad advice about something you don't really know anything about and then doubled down on it.

International tax planning is not particularly common in Canada and it would not be a good area to try to "leverage" to get into the Canadian market. You are better off getting transferable skills rather than knowledge that is almost exclusively the province of the most elite firms.

 

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14 minutes ago, Mal said:

This is the problem, you gave bad advice about something you don't really know anything about and then doubled down on it.

International tax planning is not particularly common in Canada and it would not be a good area to try to "leverage" to get into the Canadian market. You are better off getting transferable skills rather than knowledge that is almost exclusively the province of the most elite firms.

 

I disagree with you entirely. 

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Mal has experience and education specific to tax law and he is in Canada - @pineapple21, can you give us some idea of your context?
 

Not asking for any identifying specifics obviously, but these debates are better understood when the expertise of the parties are somewhat known. (I know you are in the states but don’t know any more than that.)

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Posted (edited)
47 minutes ago, Hegdis said:

Mal has experience and education specific to tax law and he is in Canada - @pineapple21, can you give us some idea of your context?
 

Not asking for any identifying specifics obviously, but these debates are better understood when the expertise of the parties are somewhat known. (I know you are in the states but don’t know any more than that.)

I'll pass. It's simply not true that "international tax planning is not particularly common in Canada" or that the work is "exclusively the province of the most elite firms." 

And, regardless of these statements, if my entire recommendation --- that Canadian graduates of foreign law schools build connections and gain experience to develop a multinational practice (if the goal is to end up back in Canada without wasting their foreign education and experience) ---- turns into a contest on the supply and demand of international tax services in Canada, that's not really a conversation I wish to engage in and only further derails this thread.

Edited by pineapple21
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5 minutes ago, pineapple21 said:

I'll pass. It's simply not true that "international tax planning is not particularly common in Canada" or that the work is "exclusively the province of the most elite firms."

I mean, if I ever had to do international tax planning I'd look somewhere like Thorsteinssons and not Mr. Chan Law Corporation operating out of a Richmond strip mall that hires foreign law grads.

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2 minutes ago, meandtheboys said:

I mean, if I ever had to do international tax planning I'd look somewhere like Thorsteinssons and not Mr. Chan Law Corporation operating out of a Richmond strip mall that hires foreign law grads.

So you're telling me I should haven't gone to this prestigious Richmond firm?

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I know nothing about international tax law but I imagine that there are respectable service providers that cater to clients that are of relatively modest means. I'm thinking of digital nomads or businesses that are small but make enough money to sustain a handful of people. I can think of a few people who do this in the US on behalf of my American investor-class clients.

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